The French Complain of Papal Idolatry

The French Roman Catholic daily La Croix Tuesday cricitised “half-truths” contained in Vatican pronouncements on Pope John Paul II’s illness since he was taken to hospital with breathing difficulty.

Meanwhile a leading French newspaper, Le Monde, also weighed in against the “sin of idolatry” surrounding the 84-year-old pope, saying it believed he was now incapable of leading the Catholic Church.

The two papers said the pope’s appearance Sunday at the window of Rome’s Gemelli hospital for the traditional Sunday Angelus blessing had raised fresh worries.

“Between transparency and opacity, it seems that the most disturbing choice has been made - that of half-truths,” said
the editor of La Croix, Bruno Frapppat.

“The past week in Rome does not seem to match the response required in respect for the sick, respect for the truth and for the faithful who are being addressed.”

The Vatican had set up a communication system to play down the illness, Frappat said.

“But the device backfired on its creators because even if the picture (of the pope at his window) might have been reassuring, the inaudible character of the final blessing ended up having the opposite effect.”

Le Monde’s religious commentator, Henri Tincq, said “most of the ends of the pontificates have been marked by this stype of idolatry … with John Paul II the limit has been reached.”

“If the scene was set at Gemelli, it did not achieve its goal,” he wrote.

“The fiction that this man, at his limits, is still capable of ruling cannot last any longer.”

Despite the pope’s determination, his power had gradually been transferred to a small number of secretaries and cardinals, Tincq wrote.

“Why not leave him his status of iconic symbol and the right to end his days in peace?” while setting up “collegiate structures” to govern the Church, the commentator suggested.

http://www.expatica.com/source/site_article.asp?subchannel_id=58&story_id=16719&name=French+press+slams+Vatican+spin+on+pope’s+illness

ggrrr . . . the French . . .

They need to recognise:mad: The French do not control the Church:banghead: Our Holy Father can not be exiled either!First the MSM now French:nope: Their so-called concerned is exposed by their cutting comments.BAH!

The french don´t control the church, because the church in France is falling, and more and more, if it was stronger, many muslims would convert, but with that church, there are to be many faith in the church and few have it, greetings

I find it fascinating that evertime the Pope sneezes there is intense media speculation on whether or not he is fit to run the church – on the part of the very people that think the Papacy is anachronistic, and have made a career out of dissenting from Church teaching. If they have severed themselves from Church why on earth would they be concerned about its leadership?

Guess it’s long past time to begin praying the DMC for France huh?

[quote=Lisa4Catholics]They need to recognise:mad: The French do not control the Church:banghead: Our Holy Father can not be exiled either!First the MSM now French:nope: Their so-called concerned is exposed by their cutting comments.BAH!
[/quote]

I think that it is precisely because they do not control the Church that the French media calls for a change in the Church.

Someone refresh my memory. Have the French said or done anything of world significance in recent history? Someone correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t France where secular humanism got its start? Thanks alot, France, for ignoring your glorious religious history, with such saints as Theresa of Lisieux, King Louis IX, Jean d’Arc, and hundreds of others.

The way I understand it, the illness the Pope has does not affect his mental awareness only his physical condition.

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]Someone refresh my memory. Have the French said or done anything of world significance in recent history? Someone correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t France where secular humanism got its start? Thanks alot, France, for ignoring your glorious religious history, with such saints as Theresa of Lisieux, King Louis IX, Jean d’Arc, and hundreds of others.
[/quote]

Don’t leave out one of my favorites, The Cure’ of Ars Saint John Viennny.

Does anyone outside of France care what they think? Scott was right, I can’t think of anything positive they have done for the world in the last 50 years.

[quote=Lance]Does anyone outside of France care what they think? Scott was right, I can’t think of anything positive they have done for the world in the last 50 years.
[/quote]

What kills me is that Germany invaded their country and took it over. Not once, but TWICE in the last century, stole their paintings and other works of art, levelled historical buildings, raped their women, killed their children. WE rescued their sorry butts twice, paying for their freedom with our blood. And now who is Frances bestest buddy, GERMANY. Ungrateful ^!@%#@. They can have their wine, cheese and whatever minorly useful trinkets come out of that country and rot for all I care.

France has an opinion? Oh my, do we have to listen to the French Catholic Church complain now? I thought they respected the Pope on at least his opinion on the war? Oh, that’s when he had the same opinion that they did. Now I get it, whatever is convenient for them. When the Pope did not agree to the wording of the constitution of the EU then they part their way.

“Why not leave him his status of iconic symbol and the right to end his days in peace?” while setting up “collegiate structures” to govern the Church, the commentator suggested.

This is what they want. No surprises.

[quote=Lance]Does anyone outside of France care what they think? Scott was right, I can’t think of anything positive they have done for the world in the last 50 years.
[/quote]

refintl.org/content/article/detail/1128/

It’s time to praise France.

In the last year, French troops have brought peace to conflicts in two areas of Africa, the Ivory Coast and part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. French forces operated with skill, courage and speed to stop civil wars that together killed thousands of people and drove hundreds of thousands from their homes.

Achieving peace in Africa is never easy or certain, but French forces brought enough stability to allow the resumption of humanitarian aid. What’s more, the peacekeepers created an opportunity for the beginning of political negotiations to settle the grievances behind the fighting.

In the Ivory Coast and in the northeast Congo, small French forces made a big difference, illustrating how skilled peacekeepers can save lives and stop destruction and displacement. Civil War broke out in the Ivory Coast just over a year ago. Paris quickly sent troops to protect French citizens there but then expanded the force to 4,000 to police a cease-fire. France also launched political discussions that produced a formal, though endangered, peace agreement. France moved quickly into the Ivory Coast to protect its interests in a former colony, but it sent troops to the DRC in response to UN requests for European troops to help curb a series of brutal massacres, some of which involved cannibalism, in the city of Bunia.

War has wracked the eastern Congo since 1998. The International Rescue Committee estimates that 3.3 million people have died from combat-related causes. Most were innocent victims who died from starvation, disease or exposure caused by the displacement and destruction of war, which has curtailed the availability of humanitarian services.

The peacekeeping mission to Bunia was limited. At the request of the UN, the European Union sent 1,850 troops, led by the French, in June. Their mandate was to protect the people of Bunia until Sept. 1. Yet even this limited deployment was enough to stop major fighting.

As the killing stopped in the city, the provision of food, shelter and medical care for thousands of displaced people picked up. Some people returned to their homes. But killing continued in surrounding towns, which were beyond the mandate of the European troops. The DRC government used the breathing space to accelerate negotiations toward a political settlement. Relief agencies began programs to demobilize child soldiers and create jobs. The UN assembled a force of 3,800 South Asian troops, led by Bangladesh, to replace the European forces and expand the secure area around Bunia.

The French achievements are notable because wars in Africa are easy to start and hard to stop. The French peacekeeping record is long and distinguished; French troops operate in Bosnia, Kosovo and Afghanistan, serving side-by-side with American troops in each place… France has demonstrated its commitment to stability around the world and a willingness to participate in complex peacekeeping operations.

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]Someone refresh my memory. Have the French said or done anything of world significance in recent history? .
[/quote]

franceonyourown.com/News_8_2_03.htm
**In **1980 France Telecom gave the French (it was free!) the Minitel, the precursor to the Internet – an estimated 8.5 million terminals were in French households in 2003. Beginning as on line yellow pages, it evolved into a shopping site, a banking tool, a place to buy tickets for sports and travel, an encyclopedia and a news source. Sound at all familiar?

In 1992, Robert Cailliau and Jean-François Groff, Swiss francophones, co-invented the World Wide Web with Britain’s Tim Berners-Lee. The French are also given credit for inventing ATM: Asynchronous Transfer Mode, or otherwise known as the high-speed internet.

enchantedlearning.com/inventors/france.shtml

AQUALUNG
The aqualung is a breathing apparatus that supplied oxygen to divers and allowed them to stay underwater for several hours. It was invented in 1943 by Jacques-Yves Cousteau (1910 -1997) and the French industrial gas control systems engineer Emile Gagnan. Among the innovations in their device was a mechanism that provided inhalation and exhaust valves at the same level. That summer, the new device was tested in the Mediterranean Sea down to 210 ft (68 m) by Cousteau, Philippe Tailliez, and Frédérik Dumas. This safe, easy-to-use, and reliable device was the first modern scuba system.

Simone Weil americamagazine.org/gettext.cfm?articleTypeID=1&textID=1744&issueID=335

[font=times new roman][font=times new roman]Simone Weil’s writings make uneasy reading. They contain brilliant insights into the human condition mingled with intense, convoluted musings about God, the world and life. Sometimes what she writes reveals a person who has been deeply wounded and who covers up her scars. Her writings speak, too, of her desire to reconcile the two realities of human suffering and divine love. In some respects her restless searching reflects the questing of many in our world today. Like her, we try to understand how God can be present in a world where people suffer so grievously. Like her, we try to discern how spirituality can enable and strengthen action for justice.[/font][/font]

[font=times new roman][font=times new roman]Simone Weil reminds us of the importance of attention, of learning to look again in a world where a culture of distraction often dissipates our awareness. She calls upon us not to flee suffering, whether our own or that of others. By being attentive to suffering, we can find the next step as we discover our common humanity with those who suffer. If in these circumstances we continue to be open to God, then the divine presence will fill our emptiness. By becoming Christ we can become Christ’s eucharistic bread for a hungry world.[/font][/font]

[font=times new roman][font=times new roman]In an age when the language of human development and spiritual enrichment is often found in the churches, Simone Weil sounds a discordant note[/font][/font]

Origins of the Internet

The first recorded description of the social interactions that could be enabled through networking was a series of memos written by J.C.R. Licklider of MIT in August 1962 discussing his “Galactic Network” concept. He envisioned a globally interconnected set of computers through which everyone could quickly access data and programs from any site. In spirit, the concept was very much like the Internet of today. Licklider was the first head of the computer research program at DARPA, 4 starting in October 1962. While at DARPA he convinced his successors at DARPA, Ivan Sutherland, Bob Taylor, and MIT researcher Lawrence G. Roberts, of the importance of this networking concept.

Leonard Kleinrock at MIT published the first paper on packet switching theory in July 1961 and the first book on the subject in 1964. Kleinrock convinced Roberts of the theoretical feasibility of communications using packets rather than circuits, which was a major step along the path towards computer networking. The other key step was to make the computers talk together. To explore this, in 1965 working with Thomas Merrill, Roberts connected the TX-2 computer in Mass. to the Q-32 in California with a low speed dial-up telephone line creating the first (however small) wide-area computer network ever built. The result of this experiment was the realization that the time-shared computers could work well together, running programs and retrieving data as necessary on the remote machine, but that the circuit switched telephone system was totally inadequate for the job. Kleinrock’s conviction of the need for packet switching was confirmed.

In late 1966 Roberts went to DARPA to develop the computer network concept and quickly put together his plan for the “ARPANET”, publishing it in 1967. At the conference where he presented the paper, there was also a paper on a packet network concept from the UK by Donald Davies and Roger Scantlebury of NPL. Scantlebury told Roberts about the NPL work as well as that of Paul Baran and others at RAND. The RAND group had written a paper on packet switching networks for secure voice in the military in 1964. It happened that the work at MIT (1961-1967), at RAND (1962-1965), and at NPL (1964-1967) had all proceeded in parallel without any of the researchers knowing about the other work. The word “packet” was adopted from the work at NPL and the proposed line speed to be used in the ARPANET design was upgraded from 2.4 kbps to 50 kbps. 5

Go here for the rest: isoc.org/internet/history/brief.shtml#Origins

I thought Al Gore invented the internet?

Half-truths, eh??

From France???

Me thinks Paris treated ARAFAT and his illness with more kidgloves than they do with the Vicar of Christ!!!

I’m not sure I would include Simone Weil as a positive contribution to the rest of the world.

I guess I don’t find the headlines all that shocking. Le Monde is a secular newspaper and represents the mainstream of French opinion which tends to be fairly hostile to the church. The other headline is more concerning, but I don’t know the ideological tendencies of La Croix. It could be a Catholic paper in the same way that the National Catholic Reporter is a “Catholic” newspaper in the US.

As for France itself, my opinion is this:
Good Food, Good Wine, Good Art, Politically Hopeless.

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