The gospel

I was wondering that since Christ did not command His disciples to write the gospel, rather He commanded them to preach it, is the bible part of His permitting will rather than part of His ordaining will? Does it make a difference? If so, how?

I don’t think it matters. Because even without the Bible we would have the Church.

Jesus commanded the disciples to not only preach but Preach the good news. I think that makes a big difference.

In our Church we are taught it is better to not read the bible then to try to figure it out for ourself.

But it is GOOD to read it when it is read in the context which it is taught by God.

We really don’t know everything Jesus did or said. And since God would necessarily foreknow that the NT would be put to pen in any case, and venerated as His Word, it certainly seems that it was part of His overall “plan”, an aspect of His will.

I would suggest that the Gospels are the Cliff notes to go with the preaching. :wink:

He did not command them to preach. He commanded them to teach:

“Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:” (Matthew 28:19)

Since God is the true author of Sacred Scripture and seeing as he chose those whom he would inspire to write down his word, I think it is fairly obvious that it was his will from the beginning. It is not as if he just permitted it. He inspired it.

[quote=SteveVH] Quote:

Originally Posted by concretecamper

I was wondering that since Christ did not command His disciples to write the gospel, rather He commanded them to preach it, is the bible part of His permitting will rather than part of His ordaining will? Does it make a difference? If so, how?

He did not command them to preach. He commanded them to teach:

“Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:” (Matthew 28:19)

Since God is the true author of Sacred Scripture and seeing as he chose those whom he would inspire to write down his word, I think it is fairly obvious that it was his will from the beginning. It is not as if he just permitted it. He inspired it.
[/quote]

good point…He did say “teach”. I guess I was working from the fact that the written word would have been a silly way to proclaim the gospel for the first 1600 years. But he did say “teach” so that will force me to think more about what I was contemplating …thanks.

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You are very correct in saying that the written word would have been a silly way to proclaim the Gospel for the first 1600 years, and maybe even longer, as we were dealing with an illiterate population until very recently, relatively speaking. The Gospel, therefore was preached, not handed out in writing. The Church’s purpose in writing down the texts of New Testament was for use in its liturgies, not to be used as the sole source of teaching. Indeed, much of Sacred Tradition was not committed to writing. We are taught by the Church, the “pillar and foundation of truth”, the only authentic interpreter of the Scriptures and we receive the fullness of truth by incorporating both Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture in order to arrive at our beliefs.

So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes by the preaching of Christ.

Romans 10:17

So Philip ran to him, and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and asked, “Do you understand what you are reading?” 31 And he said, “How can I, unless some one guides me?” And he invited Philip to come up and sit with him.

Acts 8:30-31

There are four gospels,
Matthew
Mark
Luke and
John.
Not just one.

:amen:

A teaching authority!

Gospel means “good news.” There is only one gospel, but there are four accounts of that gospel.

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