The hidden knowledge of Moses, to our Jewish members


#1

In the Stone edition of the Chumash, the notes quote Ramban

" The work of Creation is a deep mystery that can be comprehended only through the the tradition transmitted by God to Moses, and those who are privileged to be entrusted with this hidden knowledge are not permitted to reveal it".

Is there still a tradition of hidden knowledge passed on down through the ages...among Rabis? Or? I am interested in anything that you can reveal about it.


#2

[quote="Candescent, post:1, topic:299438"]
In the Stone edition of the Chumash, the notes quote Ramban

" The work of Creation is a deep mystery that can be comprehended only through the the tradition transmitted by God to Moses, and those who are privileged to be entrusted with this hidden knowledge are not permitted to reveal it".

Is there still a tradition of hidden knowledge passed on down through the ages...among Rabis? Or? I am interested in anything that you can reveal about it.

[/quote]

According to Maimonides' aka the Rambam's "Guide for the Perplexed," there are many elements of philosophy and mysticism in Judaism that are difficult for most people to comprehend. That is why this esoteric knowledge, as imparted in the Kabbalah, should not be passed on to others before they have the proper training in the Law, or Torah, since otherwise they are likely to misinterpret the knowledge and arrive at erroneous conclusions. Jewish mysticism itself should be used as a means of a more profound understanding of the Law only after one has acquired sufficient basic knowledge of Judaism, and should never be used as a substitute for the Law. Even then, Jewish mysticism is not meant for everyone's consumption, is not regarded as equivalent to the Torah or the Talmud in authority, and is not studied by all Orthodox Jews.


#3

meltzerboy,
Very interesting. I wasn’t aware of of this. Is this knowledge part of the oral TORAH?


#4

More likely it is part of Maimonides’ Mishneh Torah rather than the Talmud. Maimonides generally has his own brilliant interpretations of the Oral Law as well as the Written Law, sometimes at odds with those of other scholars. I know that Hasidic Jews, in particular, often use the Kabbala as a means of understanding the Torah (Written Law) but the former does not supersede either the Torah or the Talmud. It is difficult enough to become a Talmudic scholar, let alone one who can comprehend and apply the several layers of interpretation found in the Zohar portion of the mystical Kabbala. Needless to say, I am neither.


#5

[quote=meltzerboy;9810455. It is difficult enough to become a Talmudic scholar, let alone one who can comprehend and apply the several layers of interpretation found in the Zohar portion of the mystical Kabbala. Needless to say, I am neither.
[/QUOTE]

Thank you Meltzerboy, I had thought that Kabbala might be involved. The Rabi that I was studying with had mentioned how uncomfortable he was with the 'new age' fascination with what he said was a difficult subject meant only to be studied by those with a firm grasp of the rest of Judaism.

I do wonder if any of it was passed down to the mystic strains of Christianity.
[/quote]


#6

[quote="meltzerboy, post:4, topic:299438"]
More likely it is part of Maimonides' Mishneh Torah rather than the Talmud. Maimonides generally has his own brilliant interpretations of the Oral Law as well as the Written Law, sometimes at odds with those of other scholars. I know that Hasidic Jews, in particular, often use the Kabbala as a means of understanding the Torah (Written Law) but the former does not supersede either the Torah or the Talmud. It is difficult enough to become a Talmudic scholar, let alone one who can comprehend and apply the several layers of interpretation found in the Zohar portion of the mystical Kabbala. Needless to say, I am neither.

[/quote]

meltzerboy,
Thanks for the comments. Fascinating.

Anna


#7

[quote="Candescent, post:5, topic:299438"]
. . . .I do wonder if any of it was passed down to the mystic strains of Christianity.

[/quote]

Candescent,
I'd like to know that too.


#8

You have a Rabbi teaching you the Torah?!

I . am . SO . jealous. :blush:


#9

[quote="504Katrin, post:8, topic:299438"]
You have a Rabbi teaching you the Torah?!

I . am . SO . jealous. :blush:

[/quote]

If you have any Jewish community near you, there are probably all kinds of great classes available. Respectful Christians have been welcomed into any classes that I have taken.

Jews have thousands of years of wisdom,, thought, and debate on the scriptures. Just don't try to push any agenda, and don't use the words ' Old Testament ' -that is considered disrespectful.


#10

There is a Halachic (Jewish law) injunction against teaching the esoteric foundations of the Torah (which include מעשה בראשית [creation] except to a select few {see: Mishnah Chagigah 2.1}. Jewish law holds that even these secrets may be taught only in outline. The reasoning is that the Torah’s deepest truths can only be truly understood through a flash of Divinely inspired enlightenment when a student has reached a point where he is able to truly comprehend and to internalize their meaning.

Hope this helped.


#11

[quote="chosen_people, post:10, topic:299438"]
There is a Halachic (Jewish law) injunction against teaching the esoteric foundations of the Torah (which include מעשה בראשית [creation] except to a select few {see: Mishnah Chagigah 2.1}. Jewish law holds that even these secrets may be taught only in outline. The reasoning is that the Torah's deepest truths can only be truly understood through a flash of Divinely inspired enlightenment when a student has reached a point where he is able to truly comprehend and to internalize their meaning.

Hope this helped.

[/quote]

chosen people,

Interesting comments. I don't quite understand what you are saying about these secrets only being taught in outline. Who holds the fullness of these teachings, and how is this passed on?

Thanks,
Anna


#12

I dont even understand the Torah, how am I to think about any hidden knowledge :blush:
Actually I feel overwhelmed with the Jewish scriptures as they' seem so rich. I'm scared to even study the Torah on my own as I'm afraid I could understand things the wrong way. And so I'm jealous of Candescant. I know it's wrong to be jealous, and I feel guilty for it.

I also believe that I can never make it to even understand the meaning of the written words in the Torah, let alone any hidden knowledge behind those words. And this makes me very sad. I feel as if I needed another lifetime to understand all of the scriptures, and if I had one more lifetime I would prabably say that I needed yet another life to continue with my studies... and so on. Maybe this would even go on infinitely.

Not asking for your pity or anything, just trying to get this off my chest as I have this heavily on my heart every day.


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