The Holy Father?


#1

Matthew 23:9 says, “Do not call anyone on earth your father; for One is your Father, He who is in heaven.”

I don’t understand how the Catholic religion can call there priests’ fathers and even more so there Pope the “Holy Father.” True he was a good man, but the key word is “man.”

I see a lot of people putting the Pope on the same level as Jesus, when the second commandment says, “Do not worship false idols” It seems to me most Catholics worshiped the Pope, when Jesus is the only one worthy of worshiping.

I was wondering what some of the basis was for these beliefs?


#2

[quote=ONLYONECHRIST]Matthew 23:9 says, “Do not call anyone on earth your father; for One is your Father, He who is in heaven.”

I don’t understand how the Catholic religion can call there priests’ fathers and even more so there Pope the “Holy Father.” True he was a good man, but the key word is “man.”

I see a lot of people putting the Pope on the same level as Jesus, when the second commandment says, “Do not worship false idols” It seems to me most Catholics worshiped the Pope, when Jesus is the only one worthy of worshiping.

I was wondering what some of the basis was for these beliefs?
[/quote]

No one worships the pope. Who said he wasn’t a man? We only worship Jesus here, so get that classic antiCatholic misconception out of your head first. As for the father thing, this should help you:

catholic.com/library/Call_No_Man_Father.asp

PS: worshipping idols is part of the first commandment


#3

Ahhh, I actually missed those Jack Chic anti-Catholics during this Interregnum. I missed them because they remind me of when I was a non-Catholic and my father who is a lapsed, anti-Catholic. You love them as people and laugh at the ignorance of their anti-Catholicism. It is refreshing I dare say.


#4

You know, I have yet to get this whole thing about not calling priests father because the Bible says call no man father. If we’re using that Bible verse, then you shouldn’t call your father “father” either. Does that makes sense? And how about all those times Paul talks about his fathers or him being someone’s father?


#5

You know, I have yet to get this whole thing about not calling priests father because the Bible says call no man father. If we’re using that Bible verse, then you shouldn’t call your father “father” either. Does that makes sense? And how about all those times Paul talks about his fathers or him being someone’s father?


#6

You know, I have yet to get this whole thing about not calling priests father because the Bible says call no man father. If we’re using that Bible verse, then you shouldn’t call your father “father” either. Does that makes sense? And how about all those times Paul talks about his fathers or him being someone’s father? Or how about all the OT examples of people calling all of their ancestors “fathers”?


#7

[quote=dcmac]Ahhh, I actually missed those Jack Chic anti-Catholics during this Interregnum. I missed them because they remind me of when I was a non-Catholic and my father who is a lapsed, anti-Catholic. You love them as people and laugh at the ignorance of their anti-Catholicism. It is refreshing I dare say.

[/quote]

I think a memo must have went out when the pope died because these guys have been out in full force. All the media attention must be driving them nuts.


#8

TKDNICK, don’t get so offense, this forum is to discuss topics about different religions. I am trying to get a better understanding on why Catholics do some of the things they do. Instead of getting defensive why didn’t you just answer the question.


#9

Do you hate your own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even your own life? If not you cannot be Christ’s disciple. Lk 14:26

Or, another thought, perhaps some parts of the bible don’t mean what you think they mean. Perhaps you are not able to interpret the bible inerrantly. If that’s the case, where will you turn to find the truth?


#10

[quote=ONLYONECHRIST]TKDNICK, don’t get so offense, this forum is to discuss topics about different religions. I am trying to get a better understanding on why Catholics do some of the things they do. Instead of getting defensive why didn’t you just answer the question.
[/quote]

Wasn’t trying to be defensive, or offend you, or anything else like that…just pointing out that I don’t understand where this question comes from. There are several places in the Bible where people are called father. Paul calls himself Timothy’s (or maybe Titus’) father in the faith. Acts makes reference to fathers. The OT has several references to fathers. One of the big ones being “the God of our fathers”.


#11

[quote=ONLYONECHRIST]I see a lot of people putting the Pope on the same level as Jesus,
[/quote]

If you think we treat the Pope with respect, you should see how the Church expects us to treat Jesus!

Many people call Jesus the King of kings, but then treat Him far more casually than they’d ever treat an earthly king or president.

The pomp and circumstance that you watch in how we treat the Pope is really only a small fraction of what we do for Jesus. Yet Catholics are often criticized for our formal worship style. The “smells and bells”, genuflections, standing and kneeling during our Mass is part of the repect we show our Lord Jesus. Our Mass imitates the heavenly worship of God shown in the book of Revelation.

You may think we treat the Pope on the same level of Jesus if you are unfamiliar with our worship of God. We know that God is our True Father and the Source of our Life. I invite you to use the occasion of the Pope’s death and funeral to hear our prayers and experience the awe and reverence the we reserve for God alone.


#12

Thats what I was looking for. Thanks you.


#13

[quote=CatholicAnswers]“call no man father” does not apply to one’s biological father. It also doesn’t exclude calling one’s ancestors “father,” as is shown in Acts 7:2, where Stephen refers to “our father Abraham,” or in Romans 9:10, where Paul speaks of “our father Isaac.”

A careful examination of the context of Matthew 23 shows that Jesus didn’t intend for his words here to be understood literally. The whole passage reads, “But you are not to be called ‘rabbi,’ for you have one teacher, and you are all brethren. And call no man your father on earth, for you have one Father, who is in heaven. Neither be called ‘masters,’ for you have one master, the Christ” (Matt. 23:8–10).

Fundamentalists themselves slip up on this point by calling all sorts of people “doctor,” for example, medical doctors, as well as professors and scientists who have Ph.D. degrees (i.e., doctorates). What they fail to realize is that “doctor” is simply the Latin word for “teacher.” Even “Mister” and “Mistress” (“Mrs.”) are forms of the word “master,” also mentioned by Jesus.

He was using hyperbole to show the scribes and Pharisees how sinful and proud they were for not looking humbly to God as the source of all authority and fatherhood and teaching, and instead setting themselves up as the ultimate authorities, father figures, and teachers.

[/quote]

source: catholic.com/library/Call_No_Man_Father.asp


#14

Here’s a section from the link that was provided with regards to what Jesus meant when He told people to call no man father:

Jesus criticized Jewish leaders who love “the place of honor at feasts and the best seats in the synagogues, and salutations in the market places, and being called ‘rabbi’ by men” (Matt. 23:6–7). His admonition here is a response to the Pharisees’ proud hearts and their grasping after marks of status and prestige.

He was using hyperbole (exaggeration to make a point) to show the scribes and Pharisees how sinful and proud they were for not looking humbly to God as the source of all authority and fatherhood and teaching, and instead setting themselves up as the ultimate authorities, father figures, and teachers.

Since Jesus is demonstrably using hyperbole when he says not to call anyone our father—else we would not be able to refer to our earthly fathers as such—we must read his words carefully and with sensitivity to the presence of hyperbole if we wish to understand what he is saying.

Jesus is not forbidding us to call men “fathers” who actually are such—either literally or spiritually. (See below on the apostolic example of spiritual fatherhood.) To refer to such people as fathers is only to acknowledge the truth, and Jesus is not against that. He is warning people against inaccurately attributing fatherhood—or a particular kind or degree of fatherhood—to those who do not have it.


#15

Turn about is fair play onlyonechrist…

Why do Protestants call their learned ministers, missionaries and preachers “Dr.”?

Clearly Christ speaks of calling no man teacher and Dr. Billy Graham is routinely referred to as “Dr.”

So, how can Protestant get away with calling their religious leaders “Dr.”?

And what of the teachers in their religious schools? They are called teacher and clearly Christ warned us not to call anyone teacher?

And we are awaiting your reply to the above question as to how any Protestant can call their earthly father “father”?

There is much hypocrisy in the world of anti-Catholicism and the ‘Jack Chic’ types of the world truly make me laugh (you are using the material supplied you right now… anyone of us whose been cursed with reading one of them can see this)…strict, literal interpretations of the Holy Bible Alone indeed…


#16

Boy St. Paul is in trouble since he called himself father:eek: Guess you better throw that part of the Bible away,Oh, and Jesus said Father Abraham:eek:


#17

This thread is now closed.

God Bless,


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