The Holy Ordination of Deacons


#1

For what reason does one typically become a deacon? I'd like to become one just so I could be considered an "ordained religious", but I wouldn't really want to take part in the Mass...

So what does it mean to become a deacon?


#2

:eek:

That’s an awful reason to become a deacon. It’s a vocation, as much of a calling from God as the priesthood or membership in a religious order. It’s a lot of work, both in study and in pastoral ministry. It really is a calling of your whole person. Becoming a deacon just so you can be an “ordained religious” completely misses the point of actually being an ordained religious.

Oh, and if you don’t want to “take part” in the Mass, you might want to reconsider being a deacon…


#3

[quote="thunderboom, post:2, topic:317991"]
:eek:

That's an awful reason to become a deacon. It's a vocation, as much of a calling from God as the priesthood or membership in a religious order. It's a lot of work, both in study and in pastoral ministry. It really is a calling of your whole person. Becoming a deacon just so you can be an "ordained religious" completely misses the point of actually being an ordained religious.

Oh, and if you don't want to "take part" in the Mass, you might want to reconsider being a deacon...

[/quote]

Well, what's it about then?
What is "the point" exactly?

...and what's so bad about wanting to be an ordained religious? Do you think God doesn't want that for me?


#4

The principal ministry of a deacon is that of a servant. To serve God's people, in whatever capacity possible. Visiting the sick, the imprisoned, comforting mourners, preaching the Gospel in whatever circumstances present themselves. The liturgical ministry of a deacon, although not their primary ministry, is also an important one. Deacons should assist at all liturgies eagerly and earnestly.

If you're looking to be ordained just so you're a cleric, please remember the Letter to the Hebrews 5:4 which reads:

No one takes this honor upon himself; he must be called by God, just as Aaron was.


#5

Apparently my 'tone' seems to portray some sort of superficial reasoning for pursuing this... As if I thought becoming an "ordained religious" meant I was going to be uplifted to some higher level of popularity or appreciation. Or maybe I led someone to believe that I would have gained riches from becoming a deacon..:shrug:

Suppose I just wanted to take the next step in becoming closer to Jesus. :shrug: Perhaps becoming a deacon doesn't lead people in that direction then? :shrug:


#6

We are all called to become closer to Jesus, but not all are called to Holy Orders.
That is God's choice, made through a Bishop or Superior, not one decided on by one's self.

A Deacon's primary function is one of service. They spread the Gospel by being the hands, feet & face of Christ, to the least of His people, the sick, the dying, the imprisioned, the homeless. They perform important duties during Mass, can read the Gospel & preach a homily and are, by nature of their ordination, are ordinary minister of holy communion.

I believe you should speak with a priest, or a deacon for that matter, on how to live your life in a way that is pleasing to God. We are all called to something, and with help we can find, and faithfully follow, the path that God is choosing for us.

Peace be with you on your journey! :)


#7

Does becoming a deacon have anything to do with humbleness or devotion?

Are there any deacons here on CAF willing to offer an honest evaluation of what it means to be a deacon..?

Any good stories to tell? :)


#8

[quote="Oneofthewomen, post:6, topic:317991"]
We are all called to become closer to Jesus, but not all are called to Holy Orders.
That is God's choice, made through a Bishop or Superior, not one decided on by one's self.

[/quote]

So the Diaconate is an 'invitation only' kind of vocation?


#9

Most permanent deacons are secular, not religious. Becoming an “ordained religious” if we are to take the OP literally is actually a twofold call: to be called to the consecrated religious life as well as a call to the deaconate or beyond. Many religious orders will not accept you if you come to them wanting to be ordained. The way it works is that you discern a vocation to the religious life, you profess your vows, and then they decide for you whether you have a call to be ordained. Otherwise, you end up a professed brother.

The best thing for you to do is to find a spiritual director whom you trust, and discuss these things with him. Discern well what your calling is and follow it. You are in my prayers.


#10

All vocations in one sense are "invitation only" as to discern your vocation is to discern what God created you to be, as unique to anyone else.

Blessed John Henry Newman speaks of "being made for a definite service to God" and in all vocations we are "called", "invited" and "created" to serve the Lord.

Someone living out a married vocation of course cannot become a priest, but this does not necessarily mean they are any less closer to Christ.

To come closer to Christ is to live a life of holiness, but everyone is called to holiness in a different way. There is not one single path to holiness and to Christ, but as many ways as there are people.


#11

[quote="TEPO, post:5, topic:317991"]
Apparently my 'tone' seems to portray some sort of superficial reasoning for pursuing this... As if I thought becoming an "ordained religious" meant I was going to be uplifted to some higher level of popularity or appreciation. Or maybe I led someone to believe that I would have gained riches from becoming a deacon..:shrug:

Suppose I just wanted to take the next step in becoming closer to Jesus. :shrug: Perhaps becoming a deacon doesn't lead people in that direction then? :shrug:

[/quote]

Well, the attitude you gave was one of desiring to take on the honor of holy orders without actually caring for the duties of the vocation itself. "I'd like to become one just so I could be considered an 'ordained religious,' but I wouldn't really want to take part in the Mass..." It came off as superficial and naive; though perhaps I was wrong about this! ;)

Thing is, the permanent diaconate is a rather specific calling, within the context of the diocesan church. One doesn't just take on the (sacramental) title of "ordained religious" without also taking on the rest of ministry. It's a pretty serious deal that goes a lot further than just being "considered 'ordained religious'." (Plus, this isn't the fourteenth century. You don't just go and "take holy orders," like it reads in history books. It's a really elaborate process, during which you will be disabused of any false notions of the vocation.)

That being said - completely without malice, btw - there are many ways of getting closer to Christ without receiving the sacrament of holy orders. There are many saints who have been canonized by our last two popes who provide such examples. However, if you're interested in the diaconate, posting on a message board will never get you the same results as just picking up the phone and calling your diocesan vocations office. They have exact information and real deacons you can talk to. :thumbsup:


#12

If you’re just looking to foster your spirituality and relationship with God, you may consider finding an Oblates program at a local monastery. They practice the spirituality of a specific Order in the secular world, and often meet with other oblates or with monks of their preferred order to work on their own spirituality.


#13

oh, I see now… It’s not good to want to be ordained because that *really is *a position of “authority”. I thought to be an “ordained religious” was synonymous with living a humble, prayer filled life of servitude.

So when I said I “just wanted to be an ordained religious” I actually meant “just” as in only which is a minimal position.

I didn’t mean “just” as in ‘I only want the benefits of being a religious’, while not fulfilling any obligations…

I think it should be pretty clear why I would want to have nothing to do with sermons or public speaking at this point. :smiley:


#14

[quote="TEPO, post:8, topic:317991"]
So the Diaconate is an 'invitation only' kind of vocation?

[/quote]

Of course. After all, you can't ordain yourself.


#15

What it seems you are desiring and feeling called to is the religious life as a brother. Religious brothers live in community and profess the vows of the consecrated life but are not ordained in the Sacrament of Holy Orders. It is a wonderful and fulfilling life. Ask your pastor for more information about how to discern the vocation of a religious brother.


#16

I understand where you are coming from. I've thought it would be "kind of cool" (for lack of a better term) to be closer to god in that way. But I am scared of public speaking. I would also like to receive all the sacrements. Maybe just to be an overachiever .... I geuss


#17

[quote="cessnawag, post:16, topic:317991"]
I understand where you are coming from. I've thought it would be "kind of cool" (for lack of a better term) to be closer to god in that my. But I am scared of public speaking. I would also like to receive all the sacrements. Maybe just to be an overachiever .... I geuss

[/quote]

For me there is a serious chemical reaction that overtakes my thought process when I speak in front of more than 3 people... My thoughts 'lock-up' and I suddenly draw a blank. I look incredibly dumb... :D Oh well... :shrug:


#18

[quote="aemcpa, post:15, topic:317991"]
What it seems you are desiring and feeling called to is the religious life as a brother. Religious brothers live in community and profess the vows of the consecrated life but are not ordained in the Sacrament of Holy Orders. It is a wonderful and fulfilling life. Ask your pastor for more information about how to discern the vocation of a religious brother.

[/quote]

Yes, that would have been a perfect option for me except for the fact that Im married with 4 children... I wish there was a fraternal brotherhood similar to the K of C, except that it revolved around prayer and fatherhood.

:shrug:I don't know.


#19

[quote="TEPO, post:18, topic:317991"]
Yes, that would have been a perfect option for me except for the fact that Im married with 4 children... I wish there was a fraternal brotherhood similar to the K of C, except that it revolved around prayer and fatherhood.

:shrug:I don't know.

[/quote]

Maybe Opus Dei or one of the third orders would be a good thing to look into.


#20

Seriously, find an oblates program or a tertiary program. It's living to a religious rule in secular society, with your own family.

A quick web search turned up this:
patheos.com/blogs/theanchoress/2009/05/14/oblates-tertiaries-professed-laypeople/


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