The horrific toll of America's heroin 'epidemic'


#1

From BBC News.

bbc.com/news/magazine-26672422

Peace,
Ed


#2

I never stepped into Heroin territory (thank god), but I struggled with an addiction to prescription pain killers that began after a surgery to remove a cancerous mass from my body. My “drug of choice”, although not heroin, was also an opiate. Very easy to become addicted to, very difficult to remove yourself from. I truly hope these people can find a way out of the horrible prison that is addiction.


#3

Amen.


#4

It becomes clear to anyone with eyes that there is something basically wrong with the society we live in if a massive minority turn increasingly to mind altering drugs whether it is alcohol, heroin, or pot to survive their day to day lives.
It amazes me that some American States are legalising pot, but they argue that the war is lost and it is best to tax it. But the tax on alcohol and tobacco have not stopped the addiction increasing amongst the youth, at least in the case of alcohol.
I must admit that when I was working I found it extremely stressful. I was an industrial lawyer who worked across Australia. Always up at four in the morning for a six oclock flight to another city or town to get to court by ten.Every city is many hours flight from each other and transportation into the bush is tedious given the hundreds of miles between towns. Back to a hotel room to prep for the next day’s hearings. Once I was away from my wife and son for a year working thousands of miles away, always waking each day to an angry mob of unionists, always carrying a knife and a steel rebar in the boot of my car. Often needing body guards to do my job. Always having to be smarter than the opposition and needing to appear smart to my clients whilst working 12 hour days.
So I decided early on that I would never drink. Drugs was not a big culture in Australia at that time, but it is growing like America now.
I kept up that lifestyle for over twenty years when I was on the top of the game, and it is now only in retirement because my heart failed that I realised that we are living an extremely unnatural life rushing all the time. No wonder a lot of people want to opt out.
I don’t think the drug culture will disappear until we reassess what we want out of life. Do we want the big home, the three cars in the garage, the holiday home on the beach, the overseas holiday every year? Or do we need more time with the wife, and more time to raise our kids? Raising kids now is being a taxi service for the ballet lessons, the tennis, swimming, football, cricket, baseball, karate, extension, piano, flute, clarinet lessons we consider so important. We are lucky if our child continues with even one of these pursuits, but we are satisfied that we have given them a taste for them to choose from. It means ofcourse, more stress on our children as each one has tests, exams and barriers to fail. We pick them up at six in the evening for a hurried takeaway as a treat, and the let them get on with their homework for the rest of the night. Up at six before school for the rowing eights or the track, it all start again for all of us. Pass me one of the little blue ones…


#5

It’s sad that many won’t stop/can’t stop their addictions and recover. Many will die. A sad reality. I’ve known too many that have died due to addiction. Many that have come off heroin and been put on methadone or suboxone to help with their addiction, only to become addicted to them. Still chained like slaves to the horrors of addiction. My heart and prayers go out to all people in active addiction and their families.
I am grateful that God took me out of the drug culture that I was in and took away my obsession and compulsion to use drugs after 25 years of active addiction. Thank you God!


#6

I’m remodeling (please pray for Our Lady of Good Success’ help there…) and regularly dumpster dive at construction sites to grab any industrial-strength goodies to which I generally don’t have access. At one clinic’s job site, I found a dumpster with several trash bags full of tiny cups, each with a different name on it, and the Rx for methadone, the life-altering chemical additive doled out to hundreds every day by just this one community health center. The union construction jobs were much appreciated in erecting this monumental pile of glass and steel. And this is just the end of the heroin cycle. Heroin is good for business. The love of money is the root of all evil. And there’s plenty of that evil love to go around.

critcrim.org/critpapers/potter.htm

I post this link as a tiny exemplar regarding the Bush family’s finances which allegedly have been intertwined with drug trafficking, including the Bank of Commerce & Credit/BCCI blow-up. President George Bush Sr. cleaned up the issue by abolishing all the regional organized crime task forces that were turning over too many allegedly family-linked rocks. Before that, as vice-president under Reagan, this former CIA head–an agency allegedly entangled with drug trafficking as first exposed in the Nicaraguan CONTRA affair–George Sr. abolished CENTAC, the federal task force targeting drug kingpins. I’m fairly confident Reagan was clue-free as he was a renegade to Republican insiders. But this isn’t to pile on (nominal) Republicans; or even cross-party Skull & Bones types. I can feel the evil love all around us.

President William Jefferson Clinton, whose brother allegedly said he had a nose for cocaine akin to a vacuum cleaner, cleared the decks for things like his alleged drug running through Mena, Arkansas, by firing all Assistant U.S. Attorneys General and appointing his made men. Nobody made a peep, which is odd considering that the few Assistant U.S. Attorneys General that President Bush Jr. replaced raised a ferocious howl from the Democrats. Why is this such a touchy issue? How does that particular mechanism work to share the evil love? The Federal Bureau of Investigation has a thirty-day blank check to pursue any investigation the bureau is pleased to undertake. After this thirty days, the Assistant U.S. Attorney for that particular regional FBI office must approve any further investigation or the FBI is dead in the water. Generally these FBI requests are rubber-stamped, but the Assistant U.S. Attorney presents a marvelous choke point that proves handy for protecting the network of Bad Ol’ Boys on an as-needed basis.

There is no “heroin problem” per se. There’s a greed problem, with drug running providing a profitable if generally racist fundament for the Darwinian elite. No firm link to the CIA has been established as to their drug running in the inner city. But nobody has looked too awfully hard, eh? Meanwhile, back at the Catholic ranch, where is that cash coming from that the FRONTLINE special showed was allegedly being laundered via the Vatican Bank? Christ warned us of wolves in sheep’s clothing.

Is it not true that the black derivatives market, meaning financial instruments having no legally mandated disclosure and no legal strictures against lying or deceit of any kind in their prospectus or in their dealings, is an invitation to cloak the rackets Pope Francis has, in part, railed against in warning the Italian Mafia of their hellish destiny? Brooksley Born, head of Clinton’s Commodities Futures Trading Commission, who was proposing regulation of derivatives to avoid the financial collapse she correctly foresaw, was ruthlessly driven from office by “respected” financiers, suggesting insiders want the black derivatives market to stay black. Now where’s the “heroin problem”? Is this a bankster problem, with the law emplaced after the crash of '29 forbidding gambling with the customer’s money being erased to allow them to dip their beaks into the black derivatives markets that may surely include drug trafficking? Who will protect the sheep from high-level wolves in every quarter? We need a miracle, and the Blessed Virgin Mary is just the Jewish mother for the job.

**Blessed Virgin Mary, pierced with a sword of sorrow that the thoughts of all may be revealed, may your Immaculate Heart expose all thoughts, cleansing them in the fire of love of your Son Jesus Christ’s Sacred Heart. AMEN **


#7

I am sorry you had this problem. I do need to ask a question I hope you might answer however. I have, due to many surgeries and illnesses, had to use a wide variety of opiates for pain. In some instances I had to use these meds for years on end due to severe pain.
I never had a problem with addiction. In all instances I was able to stop taking the medications as soon as the cause of the pain was resolved or another treatment option was available. Stopped cold turkey and never had one symptom of withdrawal.

So I am very serious here, when I say I don’t understand addiction. Can someone tell me the symptoms? Do you feel “fuzzy and warm” when high? Do you feel totally incoherent? What exactly would indicate that you are addicted?

I have even had a doctor tell me that I “would never suffer from addiction” based on a reaction I had to medication when being treated for an allergic reaction.


#8

When I was addicted to pain meds, I felt high. I felt very happy, sometimes euphoric. I wanted to continue having that feeling, so I took more pain meds. It went from taking them as prescribed to taking more than prescribed. I was chasing the feeling that I was experiencing. I would take 4 tablets every 4 hours, when I was suppose to take 2 every 4 hours. Then I would then take say 6 every 4 hours to finally 6 every 2 hours. Just to chase that happy,fluffy,smooth feeling. At one time I was taking a high dosage of codeine like they were smarties. A 100 tablets would go in 1 week.


#9

Like to also add that even when I no longer had any symptoms of pain, I would pretend I had pain to get more meds. Sometimes I would actually believe that I had pain when I didn’t. It was what my mind manufactured. If I got an headache(mild), I would take strong pain meds, instead of water and waiting for the headache to just pass naturally. I didn’t get withdrawal symptoms when I didn’t have pain meds, because I just got more to get that fuzzy feeling. It was when I was on more than 100 a week that I had bad withdrawals.


#10

Im quite familiar with heroin, in KY a couple years ago, the state govt decided it was going to fight prescription drug abuse and created all kinds of new laws concerning doctor offices and pharmacies, so it suddenly became much harder to get pain pills, like percocet, lortab, etc, at that point, most people on pain pills, went to the big H, simply because it was easier to get now and cheaper bang for the buck. The state has recently even admitted this caused the 650% increase in Heroin use in our area alone! There has been numerous newspaper articles about this too, everyone is pretty much in agreement as to what caused this as well.

What I cannot understand, is that the state did not see this coming…did they actually think people were just going to stop abusing drugs due to new prescription drug laws?!! LOL They cannot be that stupid! Its only going to get worse now too, once on Heroin, nothing else will do and thats what these people will crave until they die or are arrested. Even if the state retracted this prescription drug law, it would not have any effects, the damage was already done.

Personally, I think it would have been better for these people to abuse prescription drugs, which are at least made in controlled labs and manufacturing plants by legit companies, but with Heroin, no one knows what its cut with or what environment it was processed in, so they are trusting the dealer they buy it from! Point is, this is going to cause more problems than these people abusing painkillers!

I dont think the states realized what kind of monster they created by their action either, our Heroin problem here continues to grow each year, more and more people are using, more and more of the drug is coming in, so it appears this is not going to stop anytime soon, as long as there is a MASSIVE DEMAND, someone WILL get the product in.

I think Law enforcement would be better off just using this money on something else, as they are fighting a loosing battle with Heroin and have the state Govt to thank for this, they recognize it too! There is more Heroin coming into the US right now than at ANYTIME in history!


#11

I disagree that it’s better that people abuse prescription drugs. Abuse of any drug leads to death. When you are in the throws of addiction, you are not thinking about safety and your health. It gets to a point that you would rather be dead. The main goal is having the hit. I would never say to anyone that I would rather they abuse prescription drugs. It’s like saying… I rather people abuse alcohol instead of heroin.


#12

I too worked as a lawyer traveling long distances and I agree with everything you say.


#13

I think what is missed by many, including the medical professionals, or maybe especially the medical professionals, is that addiction is pointing to a greater problem. I believe that most of those who suffer from this problem are attempting to treat an underlying disorder such as clinical depression and bi-polar disorder. If they had proper mental health care and effective medications for these disorders then addiction rates might drop.

Add to this the idea that some people are being termed as addicted when they are not. My doctors were just “nut-bar” with concern when I had to take narcotics for pain. But I was in real pain, not imagined pain. I never had symptoms of addiction or withdrawal because the drugs where in fact addressing a real pain issue. This is also true for my sister who is extremely ill with an illness that causes horrific pain.

If I took the same dose of pain medication my sister takes I would die. Pure and simple. But she is able to function, barely, with this dosage. So we are confusing actual functional need for narcotic pain meds with addiction in many instances.

I actually think that at least half of all “addiction” is not addiction at all. It is a mixture of actual pain treatment and minimal self treatment of mental health problems.


#14

Well, I also think abuse of ANY drug is a bad thing, BUT people are going to abuse something, and usually its what they can most easily get their hands on…NO GOVT is going to stop drug abuse, its not possible, at least thru the methods they are using, unless someone comes up with something that will work, I dont see drug abuse ever going away.

I find it very strange that our response to drug use in general is by law enforcement and punishment type methods…this has NEVER worked, as long as its been tried, going back to the 1960s, so why would they continue to use the same exact thing year after year, when the very definition of insanity is doing something over and over and expecting a different result?

I dont care how many dealers and users they arrest, there will always be those ready to step in and fill those positions, plus, even when they are arrested, that does not mean they are going to stop dealing or abusing, it only slows them down until they get out.

I do truly believe it would be the lesser of 2 evils for people to abuse legitimately made painkillers versus street heroin, I will say it again, at least the prescription pills are made in controlled environments where quality control is very strict, but Heroin, its anyone guess what conditions this is made…in the jungles of southeast Asia, a crummy apartment somewhere where they mix in other things to increase weight, etc. OF course Id rather a person take something SOMEWHAT MORE SAFE, plus people dont have all the other risks related to heroin with painkillers, such a needle use, clean or dirty, Heroin is MUCH more addictive than painkillers, withdrawls are worse, meaning its tougher to make them stop.

In creating such prescription drug laws, these states are doing nothing more than giving pill addicts even more incentive to switch to Heroin.


#15

I agree with you. And in countries where drugs have been de-criminalized and made available the use of illicit drugs DOES NOT GO UP. Crime goes down almost immediately since the pushers are no longer “needed” and the users have a safe place to purchase the drug they use. In fact the rate of use remains about the same, but under safer conditions and with the option of getting help for what may be driving them to use in the first place.

The US has more people in prison than any other nation in the world, and the majority of those so confined are there because of drug use. I feel that they should all be released with the exception of those who have committed a violent crime such as burglary, robbery or murder. Those who are there simply for use and possession should be released and referred to a substance abuse program and mental health care opportunity. De-criminalize the use of these drugs and violent crime will go down and we can save millions of dollars out of the “War on Drugs Program” that has never worked and use it toward treating those with addiction issues.

Who knows, we might solve more crimes related to murder, rape, child abduction, assault and the like, if the police are not so focused on a program that has never worked. If it has not worked in 50 years I say it is time to try something different. But then that might make some folks nervous because they make a lot of money playing this game.


#16

Yep, the Govt has alot of money coming in thru searches and seizures related to drug trafficking, I dont see them wanting this to stop anytime soon. Its all about money.


#17

The so-called War on Drugs will never succeed unless countries tackle the big enablers: The global banking industry. All the money in the illegal drug trade needs to be laundered. For the large sums that the cartels, for example, rake in this has to go through the international banking system. Until government leaders really and truly go after these folks (and make it personal for those individuals involved, as in jail time at the very least) the drug trade will flourish. There are too many people living hopeless, meaningless lives in the 1st world ready to try anything they have to sell to make the time pass or to just cope.


#18

I think what we have is what they want - drugged youth. Doesn’t matter what - whether they have you on anti-depressants because you stubbed your toe, or whether it is an illegal street drug - all the same. As long as they have you in another world and out of touch with reality, the powers that be can do what they want with little to no resistance as long as they can keep you happy with your modern day equivalent of the ancient bread and circuses - drugs and the latest technology.


#19

I dont think the big cartels need the banking system at all, from what Ive seen, they funnel drugs north into the US, from Mexico, Southeast Asia, Columbia, and other south american cities, and the money gets funneled south (in cash form), so the cartels get huge packages of US currency, Id imagine they have entire rooms in their homes/ compounds completely filled with cash, and they just buy things with cash, guns, vehicles, planes, houses, cops, judges, other politicians, etc.

I dont think they need to put any of their money into banks, and doubt they would, even if they could…after all, nothing beats cash on hand!


#20

I probably misinterpreted you here and I apologize if I did but did you just say that a doctor would give anti-depressants for stubbing you toe? I highly doubt they’d do that. I was abused as a child and have several mental illnesses. That’s the reason why I, and many others, are on antidepressants and other psychiatric medicines.


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