The hosts


#1

The other day I was sitting on Mall Bench and this rather aged gentleman that was sitting next to me noticed that I was reading Your Life is Worth Living: A Christian Philosophy on Life by the late ArchBishop Fulton J. Sheen and started to talk with me. You know on this and that, and anyway kinda out of nowhere he told be that we were wrong about the hosts. That it isn’t supposed to be these little “wafers” scince it didn’t say they were in the last supper and that in one of the letters (slips my mind at the moment which he said) a group had gotton drunk and one doesn’t get drunk off a little wine.

Anyway, why should I say to him? I was tempted to tell him that it proboly make much of a diffrence either way but, he seems to be one of those who refuse even the sligtest change without proper reasons. What are ya’lls thoughts on this?


#2

[quote=Montie Claunch]The other day I was sitting on Mall Bench and this rather aged gentleman that was sitting next to me noticed that I was reading Your Life is Worth Living: A Christian Philosophy on Life by the late ArchBishop Fulton J. Sheen and started to talk with me. You know on this and that, and anyway kinda out of nowhere he told be that we were wrong about the hosts. That it isn’t supposed to be these little “wafers” scince it didn’t say they were in the last supper and that in one of the letters (slips my mind at the moment which he said) a group had gotton drunk and one doesn’t get drunk off a little wine.

Anyway, why should I say to him? I was tempted to tell him that it proboly make much of a diffrence either way but, he seems to be one of those who refuse even the sligtest change without proper reasons. What are ya’lls thoughts on this?
[/quote]

If the Last Supper was a Seder meal, then the bread was unleavened, as the Seder meal commemorates the escape from Egypt. That being said, whether the bread is leavened or unleavened, it matters not, it is proper matter (unleavened bread is illicit but valid in the West).

And if they got drunk: well, yeah, maybe they did. The Seder meal has four cups. We include the third cup, which is the cup of blessing, of which Christ said, “this is the cup of my blood.” He enjoined us to ‘do this in memory of me,’ of the bread and the cup, not of the entire Seder meal.

I haven’t read this in a while, but perhaps this thing from Scott Hahn on Eucharist-Passover connections might help.


#3

[quote=RobNY](unleavened bread is illicit but valid in the West).

QUOTE]

Illicit? I am curious where you get thid information. I have never heard anyone say this before. What does everyone else think?
[/quote]


#4

but valid in the West).

Illicit? I am curious where you get thid information. I have never heard anyone say this before. What does everyone else think?
[/quote]

I am curious too :confused:


#5

This is from Instruction Redemptionis Sacramentum

Chapter III

THE PROPER CELEBRATION OF MASS

  1. The Matter of the Most Holy Eucharist

[48.] The bread used in the celebration of the Most Holy Eucharistic Sacrifice must be unleavened, purely of wheat, and recently made so that there is no danger of decomposition.[123] It follows therefore that bread made from another substance, even if it is grain, or if it is mixed with another substance different from wheat to such an extent that it would not commonly be considered wheat bread, does not constitute valid matter for confecting the Sacrifice and the Eucharistic Sacrament.[124] It is a grave abuse to introduce other substances, such as fruit or sugar or honey, into the bread for confecting the Eucharist. Hosts should obviously be made by those who are not only distinguished by their integrity, but also skilled in making them and furnished with suitable tools.[125]

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/ccdds/documents/rc_con_ccdds_doc_20040423_redemptionis-sacramentum_en.html


#6

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