The Hunger Games

I’m surprised that nobody has started a thread about this movie.
So here it is. :smiley:

I’ll let others start it off. :wink:

Anybody?

And I’m curious to know how much of the soundtrack is in the movie. I love the songs by Birdy (the piano on that Birdy track is just beautiful) and Arcade Fire. Kinda disappointed with the Taylor Swift songs.

**Is the movie ok for adults? **I’m afraid I’ll run into a crowd of 9-year old girls (no offense to any older kids who like the book/movie.) :slight_smile:

No, it’s not like twilight if that’s what you’re asking :P. It’s pretty intense and definitely worth the watch. I went to see it yesterday and there was mostly teenagers and young adults.

Its like a pg-13 version of battle royale.
imdb.com/title/tt0266308/

Very captivating movie. As for the age groups, I went twice. First time with my brother and girlfriend, and the second time with a blind girl my girlfriend tutors (she really wanted to see it) We are all in our mid 20s and the theater was a good mix of ages but probably 30% girls ages 14-19.

I was comforted by the fact that during the previews the audience could not take the Twilight trailer seriously and burst out laughing.

Dude i want to see that movie soo bad lol, how does it compare with the books?

Only read my post if you already saw the movie…

Can anyone who saw it explain what the blondish young man who was holding the male district 12 contestant on top of the transport/tent-like object at knifepoint was saying? He gave some speech while the female district 12 contestant had a bow trained on him and the dogs lunged below, but I didn’t understand it at all. Neither did my husband. Neither of us could figure a context for the whole thing, why he was talking like nothing mattered or like he was useless or something. It seemed out of left field. Maybe someone who read the book could enlighten? I felt like perhaps the movie would have made a little more sense with the background provided in the book. (I didn’t read the book).

Here is a review from one of the blogs I read daily of the Book Trilogy the movie is based on:

vox-nova.com/2011/01/11/the-hunger-games-trilogy/

YCRCM.

I read the book in a couple of hours before seeing the movie with my parents. All of us enjoyed the book. I enjoyed the movie very much, my parents less so (they thought the book was much better).

I would advise against seeing the movie if you have not read the book, because it would be a bit hard to follow (IMO) if I did not already know what was going on. Furthermore, even if you can understand everything that is happening, you still would not really understand it because the book is much more fleshed-out and, most critically, narrated in the first person, something that is inherently lost in film without ‘thought’ voiceovers.

The books, I think, generally raise important moral questions, and the protagonist’s moral rating would be on the higher end. In fact, I feel the plot was contrived in order for her to be able to be as moral as she was.

tl;dr: Movie was very good; read the book first for sure.

Can anyone who saw it explain what the blondish young man who was holding the male district 12 contestant on top of the transport/tent-like object at knifepoint was saying? He gave some speech while the female district 12 contestant had a bow trained on him and the dogs lunged below, but I didn’t understand it at all. Neither did my husband. Neither of us could figure a context for the whole thing, why he was talking like nothing mattered or like he was useless or something. It seemed out of left field. Maybe someone who read the book could enlighten? I felt like perhaps the movie would have made a little more sense with the background provided in the book. (I didn’t read the book).


I haven’t seen the movie yet but I just read the book. I’ll explain the scene in the book.

There are only three “tributes” still alive, Katniss Averdene, her so called “lover” and ally Peeta both from District 12, and Cato a dangerous and vicious boy from another district. All three know they’re the only survivors. To end the Games they run towards the cornicopia, the giant horn of plenty, from which the Games had started. They are chased by vicious dog-like creatures with four inch claws. Katniss recognized the faces of the dead tributes on these monsters, even that of her friend Rue, who is now one of the vicious monsters.

The three survivors jump up on the horn to escape the dogs. In their struggle the evil Cato falls to the ground. The dogs drag him inside the cornucopia ( why inside? I don’t know. :shrug: ) where they torture him for hours. Finally, Katniss looks down over the edge of the horn and sees what’s left of Cato. His face seems to plead with her to put him out of his misery. Katniss shoots her last arrow into his skull killing him. The dogs run into a trap door into the ground ( why? I don’t know :shrug: ) and disappear.

I assume the movie has toned down this scene considerably,
or the movie would have to be rated X. :eek:

So this is the original Hunger Games except in Japanese right?
:rolleyes:

Battle Royale is much more bloodier than the Hunger Games movie.
Hunger Games is more of a thriller film and Hollywood watered down, Battle Royale would probably be categorized as an exploitation film where no blood, body parts are spared.
It’s a bloodbath gorefest.

If Battle Royale had a theater release in the States, it would at least get the R rating or even NC-17. The Hunger Games movie, sticking to a PG-13 rating, you can expect what can’t be shown.

Battle Royale is a Japanese production. Japanese films have been grossly violent for decades. We still haven’t caught up with the gore they were showing in the 1970s.

Magazine stands over there are filled with porn even in the most public places. This seems to be accepted. It’s the same in Europe. I saw garbage openly displayed in a Holland train station newstand that would get you thrown in jail in the U.S., far worse than anything you could legally buy here! :eek: This was thirty years ago. :bigyikes:

America is the last bastion of Puritanism.

I just saw it today, and the ages were really right across the board. I would say I saw more adults, and was surprised at how many seniors were there.
I would not advise taking children younger than 12 to see it. It’s an incredible movie. It really follows the book. It’s disturbing and sad at parts, but I think it’s just a very well done movie.
And i hate for people to compare it to Twilight. It is NOTHING like Twilight.

**SPOILER ALERT **

It was a very disturbing movie and I am surprised (ok, not entirely surprised) the MPAA gave this a PG-13 without trimming some of the violence - the entire theater, practically everyone, was in tears at the scene where Rue died. That was so sad. :frowning:

Definitely agree - not a movie for young kids. The scenes with Katnis’ little sister were absolutely heart-wrenching and I don’t know how small kids could not be affected by it - particularly if they’re from a single-parent home.

The movie has been toned down from what you describe, but some facts hold the same. Katniss does shoot Cato while he is attacked by dogs. The movie doesn’t have the part about the dog appearing like her friend Rue.

So in the book it sounds like Cato is pleading on account of the dogs. In the movie it did not seem that way. That he would be pleading because of the dogs makes sense to me, so thank you for explaining. The dogs mysteriously disappear in the movie, too, but it is explained by them not being real to begin with, but the whole fighting area being like a Holo Deck where you can just write in and out elements instantly (if you are familiar with Star Trek).

I saw it today. I didn’t hear everything but he told her to shoot him then Peeta would fall with him and they would both die and she would be the winner. It was difficult to understand him but I think he was saying that it did not really matter if he died. He volunteered for the “glory” etc. I think he was expressing how worthless that was and how horrible it all had been

I felt they did justice to the book. I liked how they explained some of the things that Katniss tells us by having those TV interviews. That seemed a good way to get the background. I went to a morning show and it was a real mix of ages. There were not too many young kids. The book is big in the middle school where I work and they were excited about the movie. I hear they are popular in colleges too.
I liked how Katnis volunteered for selfless reasons for her sister. In contrast others did it for the glory and rewards from their district

Of course the “safety features” are all turned off in this one:)

I thought the movie was very good.

So, just like every time they use the Holo Deck? :wink:
I’m sorry, I’ll go sit in the corner now.

true either by choice or malfunction.

I liked the view of all the work of those people in white to created the arena. I wondered about these people since they were so unmade up for capital people.

I would love to see this movie, but would it be recommended for one to read the book first? I usually prefer reading the book(s) then watching the movie(s).

This is what passes for fun entertainment nowadays. Not satisfied with portraying adults killing adults, we now entertain ourselves watching kids kill? We truly are the culture of death. I guess this is the logical path for a society that allows the murder of over 50 million children in the womb.

May God help us.

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