The Jesus Blashemy

I am concerned as someone living in the UK about the way that the media and educational institutions here and abroad are increasingly accepting the Islamic belief that Jesus was a Prophet.

It is established that a prophet is a normal man who receives voices from an angel (usually Gabriel) and commits these revelations to paper.

Jesus by this definition was not a prophet, Jesus as we read from His teachings and actions was no less than God Himself taking the form of a human being.

Jesus lived among us not knowing his Godhead until John the Baptist initiated Him and opened His spiritual vision. Jesus was merged in God and was God; “I and the Father are One.”

My main concern is that Muslims having established the Jesus Blasphemy as a fact now repeated by ignorant Christians and particularly securalists, I am now hearing Muslims saying that “Yes, Jesus was a prophet but He was not as great a prophet as Mohammed”, despite the fact that the teachings of Jesus are on a much higher spiritual level than Mohammed.

As a Catholic I can say without reservations that Jesus most definitely was a prophet.

It is established that a prophet is a normal man who receives voices from an angel (usually Gabriel) and commits these revelations to paper.

Your definition is too narrow. Jesus was a man–the God-man. He received his revelation directly from the Father, as he often said. This qualifies him as a prophet.

Jesus by this definition was not a prophet, Jesus as we read from His teachings and actions was no less than God Himself taking the form of a human being.

According to your definition, no, but your definition is incomplete and just a bit off, if you don’t mind my saying so. :wink:

Jesus lived among us not knowing his Godhead until John the Baptist initiated Him and opened His spiritual vision. Jesus was merged in God and was God; “I and the Father are One.”

That is not the teaching of the Catholic Church. Jesus always knew who was. You forget that at the age of twelve he told his parents that he “must be about my father’s business,” and he didn’t mean Joseph.

My main concern is that Muslims having established the Jesus Blasphemy as a fact now repeated by ignorant Christians and particularly securalists, I am now hearing Muslims saying that “Yes, Jesus was a prophet but He was not as great a prophet as Mohammed”, despite the fact that the teachings of Jesus are on a much higher spiritual level than Mohammed.

They have only established this among those who want to believe as they do–not among faithful Christians. We know Jesus is the Son of God and the last prophet of God for he is the Word of God himself–the last Word given by God to mankind.

I see and agree with your point regarding the Jesus Blasphemy and going with the Muslim viewpoint. The media and such are deliberately avoiding Christ as God to appease Muslims and secularists.

“Jesus is God is Love”. Do Muslims find this offence?

Usually Gabriel? I don’t think so. Everyone has their own definiton of blasphemy

In which case you are either denying the divinity of Jesus or dont understand what a prophet is.

In Islam a prophet is an ordinary or perhaps indeed an extraordinary man who receives divine revelations through the intercession of an angel; in Muhammeds case the Angel Gbriel (whom we know as Gabriel).

Jesus was God Himself taking the form of a human. How would God Himself receive divine revelation from God Himself? your argument is absurd.

Nobody would argue with the fact that Jesus is a prophet. However, the popular worldly belief is that He was a prophet - and nothing more than that. That’s what is blasphemous.

It’s easy enough to understand, when you realise that God can be in two places at once. He took on the human form, and retained his position as God. The human form was getting revelation from the devine form. Like when your brain, being more powerful than a finger, can send a signal to the finger to make it move - yet you are still one person in nature.

I think you divide Christ’s natures too much.

And if He had not been a prophet, & the greatest of them, the presence of Elijah at the Transfiguration loses a good deal of its meaning.

A prophet is someone who tells the Will of God to men, & Jesus most definitely does that; He goes much further too, but He does that at least. He is,if anything, more of a prophet than the Prophets could be: they are not the Exemplar of what a prophet is, for He is. To call Him a prophet is not in itself any denial that he is more than a prophet - & Christians mustn’t be stampeded into denying a very precious & very valuable truth about Christ, merely because this great office of Christ is called by the same name as a function said to be exercised by somebody else. Otherwise we will be denying that Jesus was indeed a man, merely because there are so many millions of men. :slight_smile:

Good Evening Everyone!

Here is a quote from the next to last paragraph from the entry of “prophecy, prophet, prophetess” from the encyclopedia from this site…

*Then it is the Messias in person who, long foretold and awaited as a Prophet (Deut., xviii, 15, 18; Is., xlix, etc.), does not disdain to accept this title and to fulfil its signification. His preaching and His predictions are much closer to the prophetic models than are the teachings of the rabbis. His great predecessors are as far below Him as the servants are below the only Son. Unlike them He does not receive from without the truth which He preaches. Its source is within Him. *

Hope this helps :thumbsup: This seems to sum up the prophet and God relationship pretty well…

Shannon

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