The mass as a sacrifice


#1

I know it's not that we are recrucifying Our Lord Jesus... Is it just gaining access to it? I'm just concerned because Hebrews said Jesusdidnt need to repeatedly enter the tabernacle as a high priest so is this contradicting it?


#2

[quote="JDGaney, post:1, topic:302134"]
I know it's not that we are recrucifying Our Lord Jesus... Is it just gaining access to it? I'm just concerned because Hebrews said Jesusdidnt need to repeatedly enter the tabernacle as a high priest so is this contradicting it?

[/quote]

"...His Pascal mystery is a real event that occurred in our history, but it is unique: all other historical events happen once, and then they pass away...The Pascal mystery of Christ, by contrast, cannot remain only in the past, because by His death He destroyed death, and all that Christ is - all that He did and suffered for all men - participates in the divine eternity, and so transends all times while being made present in them all..." -CCC 1085

And:

"Christian Liturgy not only recalls the events that saved us but actualizes them, makes them present. The Pascal mystery of Christ is celebrated, not repeated, and in each celebration there is an outpouring of the Holy Spirit that makes the unique mystery present." -CCC 1104

When we are at Mass, we are at Calvary, we are at the Resurrection, we are in the end times, ALL AT ONCE!! :extrahappy:


#3

Well said Bab!:)


#4

Indeed! I think the keyword is eternity - outside of the boundaries of time.


#5

Good point. God has no time, so we are sacrificing Christ but he is truly risen.


#6

This article from Fr. John Hardon , S.J. entitled The Holy Eucharist as Sacrifice Sacrament , is filled with theological insights into the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass - definitely worth a read.

Here’s an excerpt (green highlights mine) :

Council of Trent Definitions Relative to the Mass

First definition: If anyone says that in the Mass a true and proper sacrifice is not offered to God or that the sacrificial offering consists merely in the fact that Christ is given to us to eat, let him be anathema. First definition. If anyone says that in the Mass a true and proper sacrifice is not offered to God or that the sacrificial offering consists merely in the fact that Christ is given to us to eat, let him be anathema.

Second definition: If anyone says that by the words, “Do this in commemoration of Me,” Christ did not make the apostles priests or he did not command that they and the priests who follow them should offer Christ’s Body and Blood once more, let him be anathema. What are we being told? We are being told that Christ ordained the Apostles priests, enabling them to offer Mass. Every priest in the world derives his priestly power of offering Mass back over the centuries to Holy Thursday night at the Last Supper.

We continue: If anyone says that the Sacrifice of the Mass is merely an offering of prayers and a thanksgiving, or that it is a simple memorial of the sacrifice which Christ offered on the cross and does not teach that the Mass is propitiatory, anyone who claims that the Mass should not be offered for the living and the dead, anyone who claims that the Mass should not be offered to obtain remission of sins, to obtain satisfaction from God, once more, let him be anathema.

Unfortunately, these defined statements of infallible doctrine are not being, what a safe statement, are not being circulated or published or taught widely in nominally Catholic circles today. And, if you look at the weekly parish bulletins in one diocese after another, you will notice that very few refer to the Eucharist as the Mass. It is given many titles, like the liturgy, like the Eucharist, but to be a Catholic means to believe that Christ instituted the sacrifice of the Mass. So what is the Council of Trent solemnly teaching us? We are being told that the sacrifice of the Mass is a true sacrifice in which Jesus really, truly, offers himself to his heavenly Father, no less than he did on the cross. What are we saying? We are affirming with the infallible Church that the Mass is a true sacrifice. Why? Because the same Jesus really present on the altar through the words of the priest’s consecration is in the Mass. It is the same identical priest who died on Calvary, who now offers the same victim, namely himself. Christ offers himself no less now than he offered himself at the Last Supper. Christ ordained his Apostles priests when he told them as we said before, “Do this in remembrance of me.” At the Last Supper, Jesus did more than merely change bread and wine into his own living, human self. At the Last Supper he began the Mass, the first one, which was completed on Good Friday the moment Christ expired. In the Mass is the same identical Jesus, as we’ve said before and reemphasize now, Christ can no longer die. Christ can no longer shed his own blood, but the heart of sacrifice is in the will. When God became man, the main reason he became man was to assume a human will so that on the cross he could offer himself in sacrifice, offer himself as a man who faith tells us, was the living God.

Very well. It is the same Jesus now present on the altar and he has, therefore, not just a human body and human blood, he has a human will. If he could die, he would, in every Mass that is offered. We know what a sacrament is. A sacrament is something that Christ instituted that externally, visibly, signifies what is effected internally, what is done externally. There are two consecrations. First of the bread and then of the wine. Why the double consecration? To signify that just as on the cross on Calvary, Christ drained his blood from his living body and thus died. So the double consecration is a sign, the index if you wish, the manifestation, of Christ’s willingness to die again if he could. But the willingness to die is there. Why? Because it is a real man who is true God who offers himself every time that Mass is offered to his heavenly Father.


#7

[quote="NeedImprovement, post:6, topic:302134"]
This article from Fr. John Hardon , S.J. entitled The Holy Eucharist as Sacrifice Sacrament , is filled with theological insights into the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass - definitely worth a read.

Here's an excerpt (green highlights mine) :

[/quote]

:thumbsup:

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is the very heart of Catholicism. The Mass is Christ’s Sacrifice. His sacrifice was presented once on Calvary 2,000 years ago, but it is an Eternal Sacrifice offered to the Father outside of time and space. It is re-presented in time and space in the Mass. The same Eternal Sacrifice is enacted every time a Mass is said. It is literally made present to us there. This Great Sacrifice has been perpetuated on the altars of Catholic churches every day and continually for the last 2,000 years. That is what the Mass is.

Without the Mass, the world would end. St. Padre Pio said, “It would be easier for the world to exist without the sun than without the Mass.”

*It is within the Mass that we follow Christ’s command to eat his flesh and drink his blood (in Holy Communion).
It is through the Mass that Grace–the Divine Life of God–enters into the world.
It is by the Mass that the priest offers God the Son to God the Father as a propitiatory sacrifice for the forgiveness of all our sins. In other words, it is by offering the Mass that the redemptive value of Jesus Christ’s Sacrifice is applied to us.
*


#8

[quote="babs57, post:2, topic:302134"]
"..
When we are at Mass, we are at Calvary, we are at the Resurrection, we are in the end times, ALL AT ONCE!! :extrahappy:

[/quote]

Wow, thanks for posting this. I didn't know this. :doh2: Guess that explains why mass is so important.


#9

[quote="babs57, post:2, topic:302134"]

When we are at Mass, we are at Calvary, we are at the Resurrection, we are in the end times, ALL AT ONCE!! :extrahappy:

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Mass - even when we're tempted to call it boring, annoyed by various abuses ranging in severity, when the toddler is screaming, is still awesome - in the literal sense of the word - every time it is offered.

I really enjoyed Scott Hahn's book The Lamb's Supper which talks about this in more detail. :) It definitely made me "get more out of Mass." The problem wasn't and has never been the Mass, the problem was/is me!


#10

[quote="silicasandra, post:9, topic:302134"]
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Mass - even when we're tempted to call it boring, annoyed by various abuses ranging in severity, when the toddler is screaming, is still awesome - in the literal sense of the word - every time it is offered.

I really enjoyed Scott Hahn's book The Lamb's Supper which talks about this in more detail. :) It definitely made me "get more out of Mass." The problem wasn't and has never been the Mass, the problem was/is me!

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: right back at ya! Those fussing babies and less-than-adequate choirs just remind me how imperfect I am, and how much our Lord and God must love us! Also, Dr. Hahn's book set me on fire for the Mass!


closed #11

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