The Mass in French?


#1

I thought I posted this a day or so ago but it doesn't seem to be up so here it is again . . .

My wife and I may travel to France for the first time next fall. We want to attend a Mass or two in French and are looking for resources online that would let us see or listen to the Mass or the prayers in French.

Actually going to a Mass in French around here would be cool but Central Florida doesn't seem to have many that I can find.

Anyone have any thoughts? Links?

Thanks.

JD


#2

Google is probably your best source for information

frenchtoday.com/blog/messe-catholique


#3

[quote="Traditium, post:1, topic:306940"]
I thought I posted this a day or so ago but it doesn't seem to be up so here it is again . . .

My wife and I may travel to France for the first time next fall. We want to attend a Mass or two in French and are looking for resources online that would let us see or listen to the Mass or the prayers in French.

Actually going to a Mass in French around here would be cool but Central Florida doesn't seem to have many that I can find.

Anyone have any thoughts? Links?

Thanks.

JD

[/quote]

I bet there are! Do you know how many Quebecois go down to Florida each winter?
They call it Floribec;)

Here's a parish that does French masses from November to April.
littleflowerhwd.org/

And this a side by side translation of the old missal, but I'm not sure they've revised it in France so it could still be relevant:

angilella.it/missa/missa_en_fr.pdf


#4

[quote="triumphguy, post:3, topic:306940"]
I bet there are! Do you know how many Quebecois go down to Florida each winter?
They call it Floribec;)
Here's a parish that does French masses from November to April.
littleflowerhwd.org/

[/quote]

The French used in Quebec is slightly different from that of France (ignoring the differences in the Mass between the two). It's not a drastic difference, but if a French person (in France) detects any Joual in your speech, there is a chance they may not be as friendly (I'm not terribly sure why that is, but I suspect it has something to do with how particular they are about their language).

Beyond that, depending on where you go in France, there are certain local customs (in the Mass), too.

These may be useful:

portstnicolas.net/le-chantier-naval/la-boite-a-outils/Plan-de-la-messe
virc.at/texte/texte_f.htm


#5

I’m sure it would help them acclimatize though.

And I bet the priest doesn’t speak Joual.


#6

[quote="triumphguy, post:5, topic:306940"]
I'm sure it would help them acclimatize though.

And I bet the priest doesn't speak Joual.

[/quote]

It would certainly help them acclimatize, yes. Getting used to spoken French would likely take more effort than just adjusting to the differences in the structure of the Mass.

If it's an American priest saying Mass they will most likely be speaking "France French," but in the case of a Quebecois priest, Joual may be spoken (I've heard it before). In general, since the original poster is not learning French and only needs to have some familiarity with a Mass in that language, the differences in dialects are probably not worth worrying about :D:) (but are worth knowing about).


#7

On youtube, you can watch French Mass videos as well as rosaries, etc. on a channel called KTOTV.


#8

[quote="Byrnwiga, post:6, topic:306940"]
It would certainly help them acclimatize, yes. Getting used to spoken French would likely take more effort than just adjusting to the differences in the structure of the Mass.

If it's an American priest saying Mass they will most likely be speaking "France French," but in the case of a Quebecois priest, Joual may be spoken (I've heard it before). In general, since the original poster is not learning French and only needs to have some familiarity with a Mass in that language, the differences in dialects are probably not worth worrying about :D:) (but are worth knowing about).

[/quote]

For the Mass though, while the accent will be different the French used will be exactly the same. Quebec and France use the same liturgical translation. The only place colloquialisms will come up will be in the homily.


#9

[quote="OraLabora, post:8, topic:306940"]
For the Mass though, while the accent will be different the French used will be exactly the same. Quebec and France use the same liturgical translation. The only place colloquialisms will come up will be in the homily.

[/quote]

Ah, so the translations are the same. In the back of my mind I was thinking about the different translations/texts in different dioceses in Quebec used at some point (within the last ten years?). I suppose then there is little to worry about in terms of differences in the Mass :D:D;) (besides, of course, local customs).


#10

I was wondering about that too: whether Quebec used a French version of our English version.

When I stay with my parents in Montreal we go to an English mass.


#11

[quote="Byrnwiga, post:9, topic:306940"]
Ah, so the translations are the same. In the back of my mind I was thinking about the different translations/texts in different dioceses in Quebec used at some point (within the last ten years?). I suppose then there is little to worry about in terms of differences in the Mass :D:D;) (besides, of course, local customs).

[/quote]

I don't know of any differences between texts and translations between dioceses (other than priests that sometimes ad-lib... but I guess in the US that's fairly widespread too). Perhaps you're thinking back to the 60s when the translations weren't settled? Or that different churches use the different options available in the missal, for example for the penitential rite (which also exist in English).

Most churches use "Prions en église" missalettes. The translation is identical to that in the French missals from France, or the French version of Magnificat.


#12

[quote="Byrnwiga, post:4, topic:306940"]
The French used in Quebec is slightly different from that of France (ignoring the differences in the Mass between the two). It's not a drastic difference, but if a French person (in France) detects any Joual in your speech, there is a chance they may not be as friendly ]

[/quote]

My wife is Quebecois. We went to France on our honeymoon, as she had always wanted to go there.

The Parisians seemed to perfer to talk to me in English than to listen to my wife's Quebecois twang. :P

It was completely different in the Loire Valley though, were we did a B&B tour. They treated my wife like a long lost relative :)


#13

Parisians are snobs.


#14

Bonsoir à tous :)

[quote="Jeff_Moore, post:7, topic:306940"]
On youtube, you can watch French Mass videos as well as rosaries, etc. on a channel called KTOTV.

[/quote]

Here is the link to their site: KTO

Programming streams live on the home page ("KTO en Direct").

The program schedule for December 8th-14th (PDF): Semaine du samedi 8 au vendredi 14 décembre 2012

The next three Mass broadcasts are all from Notre-Dame in Paris:

[LIST]
*]Saturday, December 8th at 6:30pm (schedule allows one hour and twenty minutes for this)
*]Sunday, December 9th at 6:30pm (one hour and ten minutes)
*]Wednesday, December 12th at 6:00pm (two hours and fifteen minutes; this is a special Mass for the start of the jubilee celebrations for Notre-Dame—the cathedral will be 850 years old in 2013)
[/LIST]
All times are Central European Time (CET), or EST + six hours. Hope this helps. Let me know if you have any questions (or need translation help :))...


#15

[quote="triumphguy, post:13, topic:306940"]
Parisians are snobs.

[/quote]

Isn't that the truth.


#16

[quote="triumphguy, post:13, topic:306940"]
Parisians are snobs.

[/quote]

All 10,000,000 of them? No...certainly there are snobish Parisians like any other place, but to tar all of them is bigotry.

Perhaps if someone evinced that attitude in Paris it would bring out their distaste for being pre-judged? I think anyone would get a cold reception anywhere he went if he arrived with a chip on his shoulder. Certainly, one could innocently meet people who are indeed snobs...but to attribute that to an entire city the size of Paris is, well, wrong.

Perhaps because over several trips to Paris I never found a single rude person I don't buy the canard of the rude Parisian. Indeed the many Parisians I've met (including strangers) have been helpful, gracious and pleasant if not downright fun.

All that being said, perhaps if Americans were not taught that the word for "waiter" is "garcon" - which literally means "boy" - more Americans would be treated better in restaurants. If you said "boy" in the USA what sort of treatment would you get here? :)

Just say "s'il vous plait" to the waiter and life will be better. (please excuse the lack of diacritical marks)


#17

[quote="johnnykins, post:16, topic:306940"]
All 10,000,000 of them? No...certainly there are snobish Parisians like any other place, but to tar all of them is bigotry.

Perhaps if someone evinced that attitude in Paris it would bring out their distaste for being pre-judged? I think anyone would get a cold reception anywhere he went if he arrived with a chip on his shoulder. Certainly, one could innocently meet people who are indeed snobs...but to attribute that to an entire city the size of Paris is, well, wrong.

Perhaps because over several trips to Paris I never found a single rude person I don't buy the canard of the rude Parisian. Indeed the many Parisians I've met (including strangers) have been helpful, gracious and pleasant if not downright fun.

All that being said, perhaps if Americans were not taught that the word for "waiter" is "garcon" - which literally means "boy" - more Americans would be treated better in restaurants. If you said "boy" in the USA what sort of treatment would you get here? :)

Just say "s'il vous plait" to the waiter and life will be better. (please excuse the lack of diacritical marks)

[/quote]

No: it's accurate;) Maybe you only met the immigrants:p

I remember being spat on as a kid because I was English. And my 10 year old brother sliced the end of his finger off in a hotel because there was a razor blade (the old Gillette kind) placed under his pillow (probably because we were English). Then we were rear ended and treated like the perpetrator. And the toilets were third world etc etc etc.

But we're going off topic.

BTW our family was bi-lingual since we had lived in Switzerland, so my dad's fluency just upset them more.


#18

Thanks all for your posts. They were extremely helpful. Stories of being spit on will certainly bring a thread to a screeching halt. We are going nonetheless :). From what you all said we have found:

youtube.com/watch?v=b3LJwDqiCJY

Which appears to be what we were looking for. I assume Office De Midi is something like ordinary form? It's giving Google Translate fits, but it looks right.

Thanks!

JD


#19

[quote="Traditium, post:18, topic:306940"]
Thanks all for your posts. They were extremely helpful. Stories of being spit on will certainly bring a thread to a screeching halt. We are going nonetheless :). From what you all said we have found:

youtube.com/watch?v=b3LJwDqiCJY

Which appears to be what we were looking for. I assume Office De Midi is something like ordinary form? It's giving Google Translate fits, but it looks right.

Thanks!

JD

[/quote]

Office de Midi would be a celebration of the Midday Liturgy of the Hours.


#20

Here is an example that might give you an idea of what to expect from a Mass celebrated with a lay congregation, as opposed to one celebrated in a convent (which appears to be what is shown in the video you linked to).

Mass, First Sunday of Advent, Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, December 2, 2012 at 6:30pm CET

Note that this is not your average Sunday Mass. The celebrant is the Archbishop of Paris, Cardinal André Vingt-Trois, there are at least four concelebrating priests, the altar servers are probably seminarians, and they have multiple cantors and a choir. Sunday Mass in my parish doesn't look like this!

I've lived in France for eleven years, and there are still times I'm surprised by what I find at Mass. I attended Mass outside my parish yesterday morning, in the tiny church of a town so small it barely qualifies as one, and there were two concelebrating priests—three priests total—plus a choir. Then I went to Mass in my suburban parish (long, irrelevant-to-the-thread story why I attended two Masses) in a church three times the size of the one I had just left, and there was one priest and no choir. YMMV.

Hope you enjoy your visit :)


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