The movie "Million Dollar Baby" and euthanasia


#1

SPOILERS

I just saw “Million Dollar Baby.” Although this movie by Clint Eastwood presented a pro-euthanasia stance I did like the movie. The ending did not leave me satisfied, however, because I considered it the wrong decision for the characters to make. Certainly the character of Maggie was in no state of mind to make such a decision. The obvious question is, was she given antidepressants? The logic in the assisted suicide was not formed well by Eastwood. I thought his character had the right idea when he said that he thought she ought to go back to school. Nevertheless, the sheer emotion of the movie shook me a bit.

What do those of you who have seen the movie think of it?

Jamie


#2

I haven’t seen the movie, but I just saw an article about this. Here’s the link:

Sports and Coaching, Life and Death: A Review of Million Dollar Baby and Coach Carter

I don’t know if it will work, because I haven’t posted a link before, but hopefully it will.


#3

Sorry, Jamie–I didin’t notice you had already started a thread on this movie when I started a new one! A disability rights organization apparently has some plans to protest the movie. Here’s a link to their flyer handout:

notdeadyet.org/flyers/millionbigotflyer.html


#4

Come on, there’s no valid reason for protesting this movie. I did not agree with its message either, but as mature decision-makers, Catholic or otherwise, we can decide for ourselves whether we will adhere to the ideology or not. And I’m as rigid as you can get when it comes to these issues of euthanasia, contraception, etc. But I suppose the disability-rights group has a different perspective and maybe I’m wrong.

Jamie


#5

There is a good reason to protest this movie, in addition to its anti-Catholic bigotry (we should be used to that). Did anybody catch the priest who knew less than a first grader?
The reason is that people form their opinions and decisions based on movies, in addition to other forms of input from society. Often when people become disabled, they think that their lives are over. When I worked in a hospital, a young man, newly paraplegic, wheeled his wheelchair into the lake and drowned himself. It was a tragic thing, totally unnecessary, because he could have pursued the sports life he loved in a wheelchair just as well. He got the idea that his life was no longer worth living from just such sources as this movie.
I love that group, Not Dead Yet. They’ve got the right idea.


#6

I really can’t complain about the movie because I haven’t seen it. But one thing I noticed from the NotDeadYet group was just what Viki mentioned–they were worried that newly disabled peope seeing this movie would be tempted to think that their life is over.

A local columnist had a siimilar opinion.


#7

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