The Novus Ordo Mass-What do you like about it?

Having gone to both the Traditional Latin Mass and the Novus Ordo Mass-but I truly love and do not hide the fact that I truly love and respect the TLM and all that it stands for-and have difficulties with the Novus Ordo Mass and the subsequent changes-I am curious and throw down the challenge to the supporters of the NO mass-what exactly is it about the mass that you like so much?

I have been to both, as well. I like the TLM. I like the NO when celebrated in STRICT accordance of Sancronsanctum COncilium, GIRM, etc. What I did not like about the TLM was the extended period where the priest is not heard, in contrast, I like simplicity of the NO. It is reverent and, yet, humble and simple in its devotional approach. This is not to say that the TLM is not humble, but many of the practices found in the TLM are cultural innovations. In fact, we see some of them still in the NO – ex. Lavabo….

Really can’t answer this correctly, never seen or participated in a Novus Ordo Mass that was in strict accord with GRIM or Vatican II’s true intentions.

Anyway, if the priest is not facing East during the Eucharistic Prayer etc the N.O.M is incomplete to me.

james

I also prefer the TLM, but here are some positives of the NO: I do think it is beneficial for certain prayers like the Creed and the Our Father to be in English and prayed aloud together. It can also be argued that reading the Epistle and the Gospel twice (once in latin and once in english) isn’t needed and only the English should be read. The NO also uses a greater variety of Scripture which I think is good and this needs to be read in English. I prefer the personal nature of the TLM to the communal nature of the NO. I think the priest with his back to the congregation is better becuase we are all going the same direction and our focus is all on Jesus only. The priest is more anonymous during the consecration that way. I will say, I’ve only watched the NO on EWTN once and it seemed to be just right. A nice balance of Latin and English and everything was reverent.

I like the fact the Jesus is truly present, body, blood, soul, and divinity in the Most Holy Eucharist!

Yours,
Jessica

[quote=Jakub]Really can’t answer this correctly, never seen or participated in a Novus Ordo Mass that was in strict accord with GRIM or Vatican II’s true intentions.

Anyway, if the priest is not facing East during the Eucharistic Prayer etc the N.O.M is incomplete to me.

james
[/quote]

Tune into EWTN any day of the week…

[quote=BecomeLowly]I like the fact the Jesus is truly present, body, blood, soul, and divinity in the Most Holy Eucharist!

Yours,
Jessica
[/quote]

BINGO. That says it all. Might just as well close this thread.

[quote=Jakub]Really can’t answer this correctly, never seen or participated in a Novus Ordo Mass that was in strict accord with GRIM or Vatican II’s true intentions.

Anyway, if the priest is not facing East during the Eucharistic Prayer etc the N.O.M is incomplete to me.

james
[/quote]

Thankfully the Catholic Church does not agree with you…

Haha, well they both have the Real Presence. I think it makes for a good discussion to try and come up with the best Liturgy, not just a sufficient one. Keep the thread open! :smiley:

As somone with very young children, I also appreciate hearing the Consecration quite audibly said at the Pauline Mass. I’ve said this several times before, often I am in the vestibule and since I have no visual and can often times miss the ringing of the bells while trying to restrain my almost 2 year old I often miss the Consecration at the TLM. There are quite a few people right there with me that I know are probably also missing it. I don’t want to miss that for anything and having another baby on the way, I don’t yet see an end to my “joyful distractions” from the Mass. I appreciate the Consecration said in either Latin or English.

I think the normative mass is quite beautiful said with the proper balance of Latin and English and chant too! It is nice when people can walk in off the street if so prompted and not have to figure out how to use the missal to understand most of what’s going on. For many newbies this can be quite daunting.

I also echo Genesis315 regarding scripture readings and readings in both English and Latin.

I like the chasables they wear during the Novus Ordo – much like those they wore in the early church. Those chasables they wear during the Tridentine Mass look silly – like bulletproof vests.

[quote=Genesis315]Haha, well they both have the Real Presence. I think it makes for a good discussion to try and come up with the best Liturgy, not just a sufficient one. Keep the thread open! :smiley:
[/quote]

You have monumental issues if you believe one or the other Mass is the “best Liturgy.” Neither is better (or worse) than the other.

I also like the participation at the Novus Ordo Mass. Praying the Rosary during the Mass (because they could not follow or understand the Mass) is rather difficult to defend.

[quote=Nota Bene]You have monumental issues if you believe one or the other Mass is the “best Liturgy.” Neither is better (or worse) than the other.
[/quote]

Haha well, it is a matter of discipline right? The people who promulgated the NO thought it was better than the TLM. I think we can admit, to put it to the extreme, that the current form would be better than the same thing except a marching band marches up and down the aisles and the priest wears a superman cape. It would all be valid, just not as preferable as to what we have now. See my point? It’s ok to argue about discipline matters; you just can’t argue if the Church has authority to make those decisions ('cause it does). You have to be obedient. You’re allowed to argue whether it was the best decision (this is only true with discipline, not dogma and doctrine, you have to agree there). The Church is not infallible when it comes to discipline, only faith and morals. The form of the liturgy is discipline.

I like the fact that the Novus Ordo Mass needs no indult to be celebrated. That it is the normative Mass of the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church.

Has anyone ever been to a Byzantine Rite Mass? I’m curious as to how it compares to the NO and TLM.

[quote=Nota Bene]I like the chasables they wear during the Novus Ordo – much like those they wore in the early church. Those chasables they wear during the Tridentine Mass look silly – like bulletproof vests.
[/quote]

Now, NB that’s a little petty, no? :whistle: Though I must admit, I do enjoy the fencing on this topic between you and BulldogCath :dancing: I enjoy the passion of both!

Now as I said on similar threads, I attend and prefer the TLM (my parish is run by FSSP). I feel I am blessed with this wonderful opportunity and resource. I have nothing against NO, as long as Mass is celebrated in reverence (no clowns, mimes, naked dancers, or standup comics, etc.). The bread and wine is transubstantiated in both.

As to the Indults being few and far between, to small, out of the way churches…all I can say is, Oh well, I’m thankful for what I have…I drive and hour each way, Mass is at least two hours and its worth it. Others drive 3+ hours to attend…

Soooo, Go and Celebrate Mass where the Holy Ghost leads you!

I dislike the lack of it being universal in that you don’t know if the Mass is going to be completely in the vernacular, use Latin, etc. As well the “Liturgic inventions” I dislike very much. I like how EWTN priests celebrate. Atleast they have consistancy and respect. The chausable in the Tridentine Mass I like. You know he’s a Catholic priest. There are some priests here in Orlando that have plain colors as vestaments. No crosses or anything.

Regarding the rosary comment, I’d rather have people praying the rosary in Mass than people having their hands in their pockets dressed like a bum and mumbling while holding hands with their neighbor.

[quote=frdave20]What I did not like about the TLM was the extended period where the priest is not heard,
[/quote]

This is what the reformers thought. Cranmer ordered his entire service to be said “plainly and distinctly”* (Rubric in the 1549 Communion Service)*

The Council of Trent anathematized anyone who condemned the silent Canon.

**"If anyone says that the rite of the Roman Church prescribing that a part of the Canon and the words of consecration be recited in a low tone of voice, should be condemned; … **let him be anathema."

The German liturgist Father Jungmann says: “… the priest now separates from the people and makes his way before the all-holy God in order to offer up sacrifice to Him.” In many Eastern liturgies, not only is the Eucharistic Prayer said inaudibly— so is the Preface.

The liturgist Rev. Nicholas Gihr says the silent Canon, “betokens the Consecration and Sacrificial Act to be an exclusively priestly function.”

“In every Host there are miracles, as numerous as stars in the firmament,— yet not the slightest trace of the wonders appears externally. With all this the ecclesiastical rite harmonizes perfectly. The holy silence is quite suited to indicate and to recall the concealment and depth, the incomprehensibleness and ineffableness of the wonderful mysteries that are enacted on the altar.”

           "Silent prayer is related                to religious silence, and, therefore, expresses the humility, reverence,                admiration, and awe wherewith the Church administers and adores                the Mystery of the 'Altar. **"The Lord is in His holy temple;                let all the earth keep silence before Him" (Hab. 2:20**). The                sight of the priest at the altar, communing amid profound stillness                with God alone, is, therefore, also an excellent means afforded                to arouse and promote in those who are present the proper dispositions,                with which they should admire, adore, and offer along with the priest                So grand and sublime a Sacrifice. Quam terribilis est haec hora!—thus                does the deacon cry out to the people in the Syrian liturgy—"How                terrible is this hour!" While the tremendous Sacrifice is being                accomplished on the altar, all present should be immersed in silent                contemplation and in devout meditation of the divine Mysteries"    Nicholas Gihr

Low tone? Anathema? Someone forgot to Bugnini!

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