The Palmarian Catholic Church in Dan Browns new novel


#1

I have always liked Dan Brown. I take his novels as interesting and fun to read but ill informed many times.
His new novel focuses on a conclavist group who I believe really exists, called the Palmarian Catholic Church.
Does anyone know what they believe and why?


#2

I didn’t even know Dan Brown had a new novel out.
I have never heard of this church before.


#3

They have their own pope, and claim 1000-1500 members. Most likely grossly overstated.

I guess the advantage to doing a book about such an obscure group is that there aren’t many around to tell you about your errors. Mr. Brown faced a lot of grief when he wrote about Opus Dei which is a hundred times larger at least.


#4

#5

Yes it’s his fifth in the Robert Landon series.
Angel’s and Demons, Da Vinci Code, The Lost Symbol, Inferno, and now Origin.
Most of his books have an organization they vilify. I thought in the Da Vinci Code, the portyal of Opus Dei was ill advised, they have some very conservative members but not like that. The Lost Symbol focused on Freemasonry. This new one the villain is the Palmarian Catholic Church in El Palmar de Troyo Spain.


#6

It’s a joke…I’m sorry but it just is. Maybe not to the well-meaning people following it of which I’m sure there are many but their “Pope” was a con-artist embezzler with delusions of grandeur. I hope the conclavists are happy with their embezzling fake Popes and their garage-churches.


#7

Huh! I heard “conclavist” and I assumed über-traditionalist since that’s like what every conclavist group I’ve ever heard of has been, but now I see they accept John XXIII and Paul VI as valid popes!? Modernist/Liberal conclavists? “Vatican II Ambivalent Conclavist” perhaps? My interest is piqued!


#8

Palmarians are conclavists, not sedevacantists.


#9

I hate to be pedantic (#SorryNotSorry) but there’s no such thing as a Sedevacantist with a pope anymore than there are vegetarians whose favorite dish is steak.


#10

You’re absolutely right, my apologies. I had the terms mixed up.


#11

They claim some girls saw some apparition of Mary somewhat like Fatima according to the article and it even originally had a following in the Catholic Church but then the messages became strange that the Church in Rome had ceased to be the legit Pope and they were to build a new Church where they are headquartered now. Hm.


#12

Their current pope is His Holiness, Pope Peter III.

They were just begging for Dan Brown to make them the subject of his next novel!

$5 says the Prophecy of St. Malachy finds its way into there.


#13

Since 1983 the Palmarian Church has drastically reformed its rites and its liturgy, which previously had been styled in the Tridentine form. The Palmarian liturgy was reduced to almost solely the Eucharistic words of consecration. The See of El Palmar de Troya has also declared the Real Presence of the Virgin Mary in the sacred host and the bodily assumption into heaven of St. Joseph to be dogmas of the Catholic faith. By 2000, they had their own Palmarian version of the Bible, revised by DomĂ­nguez on claimed prophetic authority and a product of the Second Palmarian Council, also known as the Palmarian synod. For these reasons and their strict rules allowing no communication with people outside of the faith, other Catholics consider the Palmarian Church to be heretical and cult followers.

Very interesting stuff.


#14

For such a small group- only a fraction of the size of a single Catholic parish, that’s a lot of activity.


#15

Dan who???

Oh, that Catholic Church hating guy…

(ignore)


#16

I’ll have to remind myself of this factoid next time I get worked up over supposed liturgical abuse in the Catholic Church.

Holy Heresy Batman! It’s as if people who were never in any way Catholic to begin with decided to make a parody religion of Catholicism.


#17

I don’t really think he hates the Catholic Church.
Yes some of his novels you would think so but I think it is more of just a critical thinking approach. Like I said his theories proposed are fiction and ill informed. I remember in Da Vinci Code there is a claim the Church suppressed books like the Gospel of Phillip and others which could be real information that Christ was only a man or something. The irony is the Gospel of Phillip is , one Gnostic, and was never one of the texts considered to be scripture like others were. Two, the Gospel actually proposed Christ was Spirit , not man. Thus the argument in the book is ironic. The Church never hid any texts. I own a collection of New Testament apocrypha. It’s interesting stuff.
I think the books Brown writes are fun and mysterious and focus a lot on history and arts which I find interesting. It is only fiction however, even he claims that. Unfortunately many people read them and take it as some sort of fact.


#18

The DaVinci code.

Really?


#19

This week’s news included the publisher of the Vegetarian Times–whose wife explained that he enjoyed a good stake from time to time . . .

And these sedes aren’t the only ones to come to the conclusion that they have the ability to elect a pope on own–a lay conclave named a priest in Montana or some such pope, too.r

SO I suppose they’re not technically seed acanthus any more, as from their (warped) perspective, they’ve de-vacated the seed . . .

I have no idea how many of these would-be anti-popes are running around (or rolled around; they seem to generally be past the age and health for running . . . )

(I suppose there’s probably a 19 or 21 year old one running around, too . . .)

hawk


#20

I also enjoy his books. The Da Vinci Code was probably my first inquiry into the Catholic Church. I was fascinated by the portrayal of the Vatican, etc., and started researching what was true and what was fiction. All of his books cause me to do such. Deception Point and Digital Fortress are excellent (not Robert Langdon character.)


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