The Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

I am doing some more research into this feast and the stories surrounding it in the various eastern liturgical traditions, and I also would very much appreciate any information available from the Latin church. This would include anything from the liturgical deposit/hymnody, sermons, epistles, commentaries, et cetera. I know that this feast is of little significance in the Latin church today, but I am also wondering if it was more prominent in earlier times?

In the Orthodox Church this is one of our Twelve Great Feasts, and I am looking into more specific details of the narrative in the Byzantine tradition, and then seeing if they appear in the other ancient churches.

So if anyone can provide any links to resources available in English, I would be very grateful.

I have absolutely no information that you may want, but that’s a flippin’ awesome picture!

From the 1914 Catholic Encyclopedia:

The Protoevangel of James, the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, the Gospel of the Nativity of Mary, and other apocryphal writings (Walker, “Apocryph. Gosp.”, Edinburgh, 1873) relate that Mary, at the age of three, was brought by her parents to the Temple, in fulfillment of a vow, there to be educated. The corresponding feast originated in the Orient, probably in Syria, the home of the apocrypha. Card. Pitra (Anal. Spici. Solesmensi, p. 265) has published a great canon (liturgical poem) in Greek for this feast, composed by some “Georgios” about the seventh or eighth century. The feast is missing in the earlier Menology of Constantinople (eighth century); it is found, however, in the liturgical documents of the eleventh century, like the “Calend. Ostromiranum” (Martinow, “Annus græco-slav.”, 329) and the Menology of Basil II (e’ísodos tes panagías Theotókon). It appears in the constitution of Manuel Comnenos (1166) as a fully recognized festival during which the law courts did not sit. In the West it was introduced by a French nobleman, Philippe de Mazières, Chancellor of the King of Cyprus, who spent some time at Avignon during the pontificate of Gregory XI. It was celebrated in the presence of the cardinals (1372) with an office accommodated from the office chanted by the Greeks. In 1373 it was adopted in the royal chapel at Paris, 1418 at Metz, 1420 at Cologne. Pius II granted (1460) the feast with a vigil to the Duke of Saxony. It was taken up by many dioceses, but at the end of the Middle Ages, it was still missing in many calendars (Grotefend, “Zeitrechnung”, III, 137). At Toledo it was assigned (1500) by Cardinal Ximenes to 30 September. Sixtus IV received it into the Roman Breviary, Pius V struck it from the calendar, but Sixtus V took it up a second time (1 September, 1585). In the province of Venice it is a double of the second class with an octave (1680); the Passionists and Sulpicians keep it as a double of the first class; the Servites, Redemptorists, Carmelites, Mercedarians, and others as a double of the second with an octave. In the Roman Calendar it is a major double. The Greeks keep it for five days. In some German dioceses, under the title “Illatio”, it was kept 26 November (Grotefend, III, 137).

Free, online resources? Or suggestions as to books, etc.

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