The Priests and Offertory

#1

Why do Catholic Priests do not do offerings at Mass?

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#2

First of all, can someone please move this to Liturgy and Sacraments? The “Site Feedback” section is for technical problems with the forum, like “I can’t send private messages”.

Second, if you mean passing the basket for money offerings, this is typically done at every Sunday Mass, usually by ushers and not by the priest who is focused on saying Mass.
It’s typically not done at weekday Masses. Some churches will do it once a week or once a month on weekdays.

The priest of course offers the bread and wine as part of Mass each time he says Mass.

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#3

What do you mean by ‘offerings’?

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#4

Are you referring to the monetary collection made during the offertory? Just because it isn’t visible doesn’t mean the priest of anyone else isn’t contributing. If you refer to the offering of gifts, Tis_bearself answered that well.

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#5

He is using the modern electronic bank transfer method on his smartphone. Just not during Mass as he forgets to turn off the sound. :rofl:

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#6

Do you mean donate? Our priest donates, do you think they should donate during Mass?

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#7

Almost all that I know of do, they just don’t always make it visible. I know of one pastor who shares his contribution amount to the annual appeal for the diocese to encourage others to participate and let folks know that he does his part. I knew another that was a religious order priest, and he purposely walked to the basket at the start of the collection during one of the Sunday Masses he presided over to show that (1) everyone needs to chip in and (2) every little bit helps {because being religious, he was vowed to poverty and had very little cash of his own}.

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#8

Do you mean why don’t priests put money in the collection ?

I recall a priest being asked why the nuns at Mass didn’t put money in the collection .

His reply was , " Do they need to give a token of the gift of themselves to God ?"

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#9

I mean monetary offertory like the congregation does during mass

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#10

If you came to Mass at our parish, you could just as understandably ask, ‘Why do most people not put money in the baskets?’.

Because most of us pay by standing order through our banks, that’s why.

In other words, don’t leap to any conclusions from what you see.

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#11

I heard from a pastor of another parish that he monitors what his associates give or fail to give. And when they fail to give he will have a meeting with them to admonish them about the importance of their financial contributions also.

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#12

The priest is busy saying the Mass while the basket is being passed. He can put his contribution in any time, he works every day at the church, so there is no need for him to stop what he’s doing in the middle of the Mass and go put an envelope of money in the basket.

Also, as paperwight said, it’s becoming less and less common for people to put the money in the basket because they use electronic giving. I only put in cash or a check when it’s a special collection for something like retired religious, otherwise I just give via my bank electronic pay system or through “Donate” buttons on the church website.

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#13

If you think about what a non-Catholic Christian minister earns in salary, and then what a Catholic priest earns – keeping in mind that they both have multiple graduate degrees and experience in pastoral ministry – then one way to look at it is that the Catholic priest is already donating potential earnings to his parish! :wink:

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#14

Our Priest, I personally KNOW, contributes part of his salary to our Church’s collection as well as certain charities. Many Priests do but don’t want it “blared out there” for all to know. They don’t need it to be known because it would appear prideful for them to make it known.

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closed #15

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