The Seven Sacraments


#1

i was trying to read some information on the 7 sacraments on newadvent.com but i still don’t really understand it. is it biblical? is it in the bible at all? if so, can i get some verses? i tried to skim my way through the readings, but it all seemed like a mess of latin … thanks!


#2

[quote=claydoc33]i was trying to read some information on the 7 sacraments on newadvent.com but i still don’t really understand it. is it biblical? is it in the bible at all? if so, can i get some verses? i tried to skim my way through the readings, but it all seemed like a mess of latin … thanks!
[/quote]

For another, more simple, source, you can look on catholic.com at their apologetics articles.

Yes, they are very scriptural. Take for example The Eucharist. The Eucharist is taught by Christ in John 6 where he tells the people they must eat His flesh and drink His blood in order to have eternal life. Many people walked away at that moment and refused to associate with Jesus again. Paul teaches it in 1Cor11 when he says “27 Therefore whosoever shall eat this bread, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord.” The idea that you are guilty of “the blood of the Lord” points to a true presence in the Eucharist.

Anointing of the sick is shown in James 5 I think it is when he talks about anointing a sick person with oil.

Confession is supported by Christ in John20 when Christ tells His disciples “23 Whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained.” He gave His apostles the authority to forgive sins.

Baptism is supported in the gospel of John and in Acts.

The remaining, Ordination, Marriage, and confirmation are supported at various times throughout the NT. I know that there are some mentions of Ordination in Acts.

The Sacraments are a ceremony or event when God acts through His disciples to instill Grace in a person, or to make a bond with the person.


#3

how did they ever get to the point of being acts that “instill grace in someone?” and exactly what does that mean? in some of the readings i looked over, i think they said that salvation went hand in hand with the sacraments. is that true? or are the sacraments just a way of showing your faith publicly?


#4

[quote=claydoc33]how did they ever get to the point of being acts that “instill grace in someone?” and exactly what does that mean? in some of the readings i looked over, i think they said that salvation went hand in hand with the sacraments. is that true? or are the sacraments just a way of showing your faith publicly?
[/quote]

Yes, Sacraments are “signs” of God’s love for us, and infuse us with His Grace. His Grace is what grants us salvation. We lose Grace when we (turn away from God’s love and) sin, we gain Grace through Sacraments and living out our faith in Christ. (I hope I’ve said that right). All the Sacraments had their roots in the Old Testament, or “types” as they are called.

Tim Gray wrote a book, “Sacraments in Scripture” which shows where the Sacraments were pre-figured in the Old Testament and manifested in the New Testament, then he shows how they apply to us today. Great Read!!! And he doesn’t use any Latin in the book. I think you can find it at EmmausRoad.Org or used on Amazon.com.

God Bless,

NotWorthy


#5

If your question is motivated by the implication that the bible alone has authority, then your misunderstanding and confusion goes far deeper than any question you might have about the sacraments.

Bibliolatry is a 16th century heresy, and ironically it is not biblical.

While the gracious Catholics on this thread have responded kindly, I would like to be the one to remind you that the premise of your question is deeply defective.


#6

Let’s take Confirmation for one:
In the Old Testament, the anointing by the Holy Spirit led to great things:
Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the midst of this brothers; and the Spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward” (1 Sam. l 16:13).

In the New Testament, we see Jesus beginning his public ministry with the anointing of the Holy Spirit: Jesus of Nazareth was anointed when He was baptized in the Jordan River, where “God anointed (Him) with the Holy Spirit and with power” (Acts 10:38). When Jesus came up from the Jordan waters “the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form, as a dove” (Lk. 3:22).

Right after Jesus is anointed, He is “led by the Spirit” into the wilderness (Lk. 4:1). Upon his return, Luke reinforces his point by writing, “He returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee” (Lk. 4:14). All that Jesus does, from His miraculous healings to dynamic teaching, He does in the power of the Spirit.

The full force of the anointing we receive in Confirmation can only be grasped in relation to the primary anointing accomplished by the Holy Spirit, that of Jesus Christ. Every action of Jesus’ life gave evidence of the fullness of this anointing. Our lives should also bear fruit that is worthy of those who have been anointed in the power of the Holy Spirit. We should all be led by the Spirit, just as Jesus was, “for all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God” (Rom. 8:"14). In our Baptism and Confirmation, we are anointed in the Spirit, and thus we all participate, to a certain degree, in the priestly , prophetic, and kingly mission of Jesus (cf. Cat. No. 783).

God Bless,

NotWorthy


#7

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