The sinful woman


#1

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Luke 7:36-50.

Was it custom for a Pharisee to have a woman anoint his guests’ feet before a meal?


#2

No, the custom was for the host the wash his guests feet when they entered his home, as well as give him a kiss of welcome. I once watched a Mother Angelica commentary on this story, where she explained that the Pharisee did not do either of these things for Our Lord Jesus, which was great disrespect towards Him. Meanwhile, a sinful woman was able to perform the actions that the Pharisee was supposed to do by washing, anointing, and kissing Our Lord Jesus’ feet.

May God bless you abundantly and forever! :slight_smile:


#3

It is my understanding that the washing of feet was “a service of slaves” or at least that is how Pope Benedict XVI described it in his book, Jesus of Nazareth - Holy Week: From the Entrance into Jerusalem to the Resurrection, page 56. This was why it was such a big deal later on when Jesus assumed the role of a lowly household servant and washed the feet of his disciples.

So, if he had a household servant, the host may have greeted his guest with a kiss but probably delegated the washing of his guest’s feet to his household servant.


#4

The woman recognized Jesus as Lord and had a bigger dept spritually compared to Peter. Peter did non of those things even though he was the leader of the future church, even Jesus said that the one who is more in debt is more thankful then the one who is in hardly in any dept. Hope that makes some since.


#5

The way I read it is that Simon was wealthier than most and his guests, including Jesus (the Teacher), were reclining on lounges around the table when the sinful woman walked into the room with the alabaster jug of oil.
Christ recognised her as a sinner who had been forgiven: Simon as a woman of bad repute who had somehow been admitted to his dining room as a servant.
Is that a fair read of the situation?


#6

… that doesn’t read properly, my apologies -

Christ recognised her as a sinner who had been forgiven. Simon knew her as a woman of bad repute who had somehow been admitted to his dining room as a servant.
Is that a fair read of the situation?


#7

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