The Single Vocation

why does everyone tell me these days that majorty of young people want to remain single!!

is it not the catholic view to struggle in poverty if so have too:)

are young people these days only interested in number 1..............them selves!!!

i think a lot of people will die on there own lonely because of this generations way of thinking and living.........................it just shows we need god !!!!

Catholics do not have to struggle in poverty. Being poor is not a requirement!

The young people I know have or are completing their college education first before getting married. After they have their degree, then many are getting married and starting families.

My own children plan on completing their degrees before they get married. That will allow them to hopefully support a family better. One cannot get a very good job with no degree or training these days.

There is such a thing as a vocation to chaste single life. Some people are not called to marriage, religious life, or priesthood.

God Bless

I'm 25 and looking for someone. I just haven't found the right person yet. Even if I had I would not have been ready to marry until now.

I think that people are just getting married later. I'm looking to establish myself so that I can afford to raise a family before I think of marriage.

I wanted to get a degree,. work a few years, and finish my graduate program before starting a family. It is too hard to work, raise an family, and go to school. I wanted to get everything out of the way so that I could afford to raise a larger family, and spend time with them instead of worrying about graduate school.

Now my life in on track, I'm in a relationship with a strong conservative Catholic, and I am feeling far more confident that if she is the one I would be able to provide for her.

[quote="alwayslooking, post:4, topic:251520"]
I'm 25 and looking for someone. I just haven't found the right person yet. Even if I had I would not have been ready to marry until now.

I think that people are just getting married later. I'm looking to establish myself so that I can afford to raise a family before I think of marriage.

I wanted to get a degree,. work a few years, and finish my graduate program before starting a family. It is too hard to work, raise an family, and go to school. I wanted to get everything out of the way so that I could afford to raise a larger family, and spend time with them instead of worrying about graduate school.

Now my life in on track, I'm in a relationship with a strong conservative Catholic, and I am feeling far more confident that if she is the one I would be able to provide for her.

[/quote]

Obviously for you, the single celibate state was a transitory state as your attraction was to work and finish your graduate program before moving on to marriage.

There is also a call to the single celibate state that is a call to that state per se - and most often also some sort of ministry or lifestyle as a single celibate person. This type of call to the single celibate state can be for a certain period only or it can be for life.

TS

[quote="TiggerS, post:5, topic:251520"]
There is also a call to the single celibate state that is a call to that state per se - and most often also some sort of ministry or lifestyle as a single celibate person. This type of call to the single celibate state can be for a certain period only or it can be for life.

[/quote]

A person may discern that they are called to a life of celibacy before they discern anything further, but I don't think anyone is called to simply wander around without for the rest of their life. They may be called to the priesthood or religious life- but later in their lives. They may be called to be a consecrated virgin, or to give themselves fully to some sort of apostolate in the Church. There are hermits who have very little interaction with others, but I'd imagine that even those would be called to some kind of consecration (not within a community, but alone) to the Church. Somehow, I don't see God calling someone to just be single and leaving it at that.

POST-SYNODAL
APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
***VITA CONSECRATA ***
OF THE HOLY FATHER
JOHN PAUL II
TO THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY
RELIGIOUS ORDERS AND CONGREGATIONS
SOCIETIES OF APOSTOLIC LIFE
SECULAR INSTITUTES
AND ALL THE FAITHFUL
ON THE CONSECRATED LIFE AND ITS MISSION
IN THE CHURCH AND IN THE WORLD
vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_jp-ii_exh_25031996_vita-consecrata_en.html

We are all aware of the treasure which the gift of the consecrated life in the variety of its charisms and institutions represents for the ecclesial community. *Together let us thank God *for the Religious Orders and Institutes devoted to contemplation or the works of the apostolate, for Societies of Apostolic Life, for Secular Institutes and for other groups of consecrated persons, as well as for all those individuals who, in their inmost hearts, dedicate themselves to God by a special consecration.

Not all hermits are consecrated by The Church:

Catholic Catechism: scborromeo.org/ccc/p123a9p4.htm#926
920 Without always professing the three evangelical counsels publicly, hermits "devote their life to the praise of God and salvation of the world through a stricter separation from the world, the silence of solitude and assiduous prayer and penance."460

vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_jp-ii_exh_30121988_christifideles-laici_en.html

POST-SYNODAL
APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
CHRISTIFIDELES LAICI
OF
HIS HOLINESS

JOHN PAUL II

ON THE VOCATION AND THE MISSION

OF THE LAY FAITHFUL

IN THE CHURCH AND IN THE WORLD

The Various Vocations in the Lay State
…………………Along the same line the Second Vatican Council states: “This lay spirituality should take its particular character from the circumstances of one’s state in life (married and familylife, celibacy, widowhood), from one’s state of health and from one’s professional and social activity. All should not cease to develop earnestly the qualities and talents bestowed on them in accord with these conditions of life and should make use of the gifts which they have received from the Holy Spirit”(208)……………

Private Vows are covered by Canon Law.
Those who have a vocation to the single lay state are committed to a certain ministry or way of life and this is their apostolate and call within The Church.

.

I don't see God calling someone to just be single and leaving it at that.

All the baptized have a very unique and personal call to holiness and to The Gospel. My experience is that those who are called to the single celibate state are committed in varying radical ways to this call to holiness and The Gospel and most often through some ministry or lifestyle, way of life. Some do make private vows to the evangelical counsels and live these vows out in varying radical ways.
To anyone considering a vocation to the celibate single state, I would strongly recommend spiritual direction and affirmation of this vocation by such direction and on an ongoing basis.

[quote="ChristisRisen32, post:3, topic:251520"]
There is such a thing as a vocation to chaste single life. Some people are not called to marriage, religious life, or priesthood.

[/quote]

I've heard the vocation called the generous single life.

Here's how you think of it. God has called everyone to a particular vocation. What you're saying is that the single life just is the "fallback" or "plan B" when all others fail. God does not call people to a "plan B".

God has a vocation, a "plan A", for everyone, and for some people that plan is to remain unattached to be able to help the Church in whatever way they best can.

So, just to be clear, being single doesn't mean they missed their vocation. For some, that is their call. And a vocation is simply a call, a call to follow God's plan for you.

[quote="curlycool89, post:9, topic:251520"]

Here's how you think of it. God has called everyone to a particular vocation. What you're saying is that the single life just is the "fallback" or "plan B" when all others fail. God does not call people to a "plan B".

[/quote]

[quote="curlycool89, post:9, topic:251520"]

So, just to be clear, being single doesn't mean they missed their vocation. For some, that is their call. And a vocation is simply a call, a call to follow God's plan for you.

[/quote]

May I ask what the basis for this is? I'm particularly interested in official teaching (Bible, Catechism, Canon Law).

[quote="kevin294, post:1, topic:251520"]
why does everyone tell me these days that majorty of young people want to remain single!!

is it not the catholic view to struggle in poverty if so have too:)

are young people these days only interested in number 1..............them selves!!!

i think a lot of people will die on there own lonely because of this generations way of thinking and living.........................it just shows we need god !!!!

[/quote]

Sorry dude, but I'm 41 and single and chaste. I am not called to a religious life and I don't feel compelled to go out and hubby-search just for the idea of getting married just to get married. There are many vocations in life. They aren't limited to entering religious life or getting married. I am single, and I enjoy being single. That doesn't mean I don't have God.

[quote="Norseman82, post:10, topic:251520"]
May I ask what the basis for this is? I'm particularly interested in official teaching (Bible, Catechism, Canon Law).

[/quote]

POST-SYNODAL
APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
**VITA CONSECRATA **
OF THE HOLY FATHER
JOHN PAUL II
TO THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY
RELIGIOUS ORDERS AND CONGREGATIONS
SOCIETIES OF APOSTOLIC LIFE
SECULAR INSTITUTES
AND ALL THE FAITHFUL
ON THE CONSECRATED LIFE AND ITS MISSION
IN THE CHURCH AND IN THE WORLD
vatican.va/holy_father/jo...ecrata_en.html

We are all aware of the treasure which the gift of the consecrated life in the variety of its charisms and institutions represents for the ecclesial community. Together let us thank God *for the Religious Orders and Institutes devoted to contemplation or the works of the apostolate, for Societies of Apostolic Life, for Secular Institutes **and for other groups of consecrated persons, as well as for all those individuals who, in their inmost hearts, dedicate themselves to God by a special consecration*.

Not all hermits are consecrated by The Church, they simply live in the state of poverty, chastity and obedience. Catholic Catechism: scborromeo.org/ccc/p123a9p4.htm#926
920 Without always professing the three evangelical counsels publicly, hermits "devote their life to the praise of God and salvation of the world through a stricter separation from the world, the silence of solitude and assiduous prayer and penance."460

*See next Post *

[LEFT]Post 2[/LEFT]

POST-SYNODAL
APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
CHRISTIFIDELES LAICI
OF
HIS HOLINESS

JOHN PAUL II

ON THE VOCATION AND THE MISSION

OF THE LAY FAITHFUL

IN THE CHURCH AND IN THE WORLD

vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_jp-ii_exh_30121988_christifideles-laici_en.html

The Various Vocations in the Lay State
…………………Along the same line the Second Vatican Council states: "This lay spirituality should take its particular character from the circumstances of one's state in life (married and familylife, celibacy, widowhood), from one's state of health and from one's professional and social activity. All should not cease to develop earnestly the qualities and talents bestowed on them in accord with these conditions of life and should make use of the gifts which they have received from the Holy Spirit"(208)…………..

Private Vows are covered by Canon Law.

Those who have a vocation to the single lay state are committed to a certain ministry or way of life and this is their apostolate and call within The Church. Some make private vows to the evangelical counsels (and private vows can be received during Mass with the agreement of the celebrant). Some single celibate lay people simply live out their committment to Christ and His Gospel without any sort of vows or promises. As it states in "Vita Consecrate" as quoted above some "in their inmost hearts, dedicate themselves to God by a special consecration".

Also see Catholic Catechism:
scborromeo.org/ccc/para/2231.htm

**2231 **Some forgo marriage in order to care for their parents or brothers and sisters, to give themselves more completely to a profession, or to serve other honorable ends. They can contribute greatly to the good of the human family.

Well stated.
All things are possible to God and He can call single people to remain single and celibate embracing Christ and His Gospel in some endeavor either within The Church or in the world. There is no Plan B with God. He is continually and always calling us to holiness and Unity with Him and providing all the necessary Graces - and calling us along a certain path in life.

[quote="TiggerS, post:12, topic:251520"]
POST-SYNODAL
APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
**VITA CONSECRATA **
OF THE HOLY FATHER
JOHN PAUL II
TO THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY
RELIGIOUS ORDERS AND CONGREGATIONS
SOCIETIES OF APOSTOLIC LIFE
SECULAR INSTITUTES
AND ALL THE FAITHFUL
ON THE CONSECRATED LIFE AND ITS MISSION
IN THE CHURCH AND IN THE WORLD
vatican.va/holy_father/jo...ecrata_en.html

*See next Post *

[/quote]

Except that's not what I was asking about.

[quote="Norseman82, post:15, topic:251520"]
Except that's not what I was asking about.

[/quote]

I've quoted two Church Documents which are highly regarded and often quoted - and also the Catholic Catechism. These are sufficient, I think, to underscore the validity of the single celibate state as a potential call and vocation from God and as a recognized state by The Church.

Canon Law:
ourladyswarriors.org/
Can. 225 ß1 Since lay people, like all Christ's faithful, are deputed to the apostolate by baptism and confirmation, they are bound by the general obligation and they have the right, whether as individuals or in associations, to strive so that the divine message of salvation may be known and accepted by all people throughout the world. This obligation is all the more insistent in circumstances in which only through them are people able to hear the Gospel and to know Christ.

ß2 They have also, according to the condition of each, the special obligation to permeate and perfect the temporal order of things with the spirit of the Gospel. In this way, particularly in conducting secular business and exercising secular functions, they are to give witness to Christ.

Matthew Chapter 19
[11] Who said to them: All men take not this word, but they to whom it is given. [12] For there are eunuchs, who were born so from their mother's womb: and there are eunuchs, who were made so by men: and there are eunuchs, who have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven. He that can take, let him take it.

Can you quote from Scripture, Church Documents, the Catholic Catechism or from Canon Law where it is stated that the single celibate state is never a vocation and call from God? That God only calls individuals to marriage, priesthood and/or religious life, never to the single lay celibate state?

TS

[quote="TiggerS, post:16, topic:251520"]
I've quoted two Church Documents which are highly regarded and often quoted - and also the Catholic Catechism. These are sufficient, I think, to underscore the validity of the single celibate state as a potential call and vocation from God and as a recognized state by The Church.

Can you quote from Scripture, Church Documents, the Catholic Catechism or from Canon Law where it is stated that the single celibate state is never a vocation and call from God? That God only calls individuals to marriage, priesthood and/or religious life, never to the single lay celibate state?

TS

[/quote]

That was NOT what I was talking about. Please reread the posts I was responding to.

[quote="Norseman82, post:17, topic:251520"]
That was NOT what I was talking about. Please reread the posts I was responding to.

[/quote]

I think that these are the posts to which you refer:

Originally Posted by curlycool89 forums.catholic.com/images/buttons_khaki/viewpost.gif
*Here's how you think of it. God has called everyone to a particular vocation. What you're saying is that the single life just is the "fallback" or "plan B" when all others fail. God does not call people to a "plan B". *

Originally Posted by curlycool89 forums.catholic.com/images/buttons_khaki/viewpost.gif
So, just to be clear, being single **doesn't** mean they missed their vocation. For some, that is their call. And a vocation is simply a call, a call to follow God's plan for you.

I am sorry, but if you do not have the answers you are seeking from what I have already quoted, then I dont understand your questions at all and could go round in circles trying to discern what those questions might be. Apologies!:shrug: The alternative is that I am responding to the wrong post and clarification of your post to which you refer would help.

CurlyCool as I understand it is stating that being single is not of necessity a default or transitory situation as one seeks one's actual life vocation - rather it can be an actual vocation and call from God i.e. the single celibate state. And his comments are supported by documents I have already quoted.

TS

[quote="TiggerS, post:16, topic:251520"]
I've quoted two Church Documents which are highly regarded and often quoted - and also the Catholic Catechism. These are sufficient, I think, to underscore the validity of the single celibate state as a potential call and vocation from God and as a recognized state by The Church.

Can you quote from Scripture, Church Documents, the Catholic Catechism or from Canon Law where it is stated that the single celibate state is never a vocation and call from God? That God only calls individuals to marriage, priesthood and/or religious life, never to the single lay celibate state?

TS

[/quote]

Also, please define what are you referring to as the "single celibate state". Is it the same as what is listed in CCC 914-933 when it refers to the "consecrated life" subset of "virginity for the sake of the kingdom"? I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just want to make sure we are not misunderstanding each other.

[quote="TiggerS, post:18, topic:251520"]
I think that these are the posts to which you refer:

I am sorry, but if you do not have the answers you are seeking from what I have already quoted, then I dont understand your questions at all and could go round in circles trying to discern what those questions might be. Apologies!:shrug: The alternative is that I am responding to the wrong post and clarification of your post to which you refer would help.

CurlyCool as I understand it is stating that being single is not of necessity a default or transitory situation as one seeks one's actual life vocation - rather it can be an actual vocation and call from God i.e. the single celibate state. And his comments are supported by documents I have already quoted.

TS

[/quote]

That's right, those are the quotes I was referring to. I wanted to know where in Church teaching does it say that "God has no plan B". If CurlyCool or someone else can show me that, I will show in the CCC where it implies that it is a "plan B". Of course, in order for us to not go in circles any more, I really need you to define "single celibate state" as I requested in my previous post.

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