The spirituality of Saint Ignatius of Loyola


#1

Someone is inviting me to attend a meeting group which is focusing on the spirituality of Saint Ignatius of Loyola - I was wondering if anyone is following the Saint’s spirituality.

After reading the book of Brother Lawrence, Practice the Presence of God, it sounds to me that St. Ignatius’ spirituality might be the next step for me to explore. However, I am currently a S.F.O candidacy I am trying not to rush and learn many things at the same time. I want to take one thing at a time in my journey.

Any inputs and advices are very much appreciated.

Thanks!


#2

My Mother, who was born on St. Ursula’s feastday in 1918, has, as her middle name, Loyola. I have a little booklet from the Sanctuary of Loyola in Spain, from someone else’s trip. I also have perused the Catholic Magazine, America, frequently as well as depending upon them to recommend books for my mother and myself, to read … primarily new fiction. As much as it is easy to share in the poverty of the Franciscans, I like that Jesuits want us to have the freedom to think. His motto was Ad maiorem Dei gloriam … the highest service and praise of God …


#3

I’ve heard on Fr.Groscels’ program that the 12 steps of AA /or the spirituality of AA,I can’t remember which
are based on St Ignatius’ spirituality.How wonderful his spirituality have helped so many in their brokeness and even though it is a non-religeous organization.I know these people in recovery are very spiritual and pragmatic in their daily life.I don’t know the specifics,I think having something to do with the Oxford group.
If a lot of Ex-whatevers can do it ,your a shoe in…God Bless


#4

So take things slowly. I am in a 1221 group based on Franciscan spirituality. However, my spiritual director is Jesuit, and I just finished a retreat based on the Spiritual Exercises, and I see no conflict whatever between the two thoughts. Just take it slowly on both methods of spirituality and see if they mesh together.:slight_smile:


#5

From AA history, I got the impression that the main source of the 12 steps was indeed the Oxford Group. Now perhaps Bill W. was influenced by Ignatian spirituality in the 1950s wgen he wrote the book about the 12 steps and 12 traditions.


#6

I found the saints’ writings though each has his or her own style and main emphasis, they all led us to the same direction. They help us love God, work toward holiness and experience the Divine.

St. Ignatius is famous for his “Spiritual Exercise”. The last exercise he offers in The Spiritual Exercises is called the Contemplation to Attain Love. There are four steps.

The first step is to recall all the gifts God has given you ── your life, your family,
your faith…… everything. Ignatius tells us to offer everything God has given to you, including you yourself and God himself back to God.

The second step is to ponder the Divine in everything. God is in every creature by its essence, power, and presence. God is in you. You are encouraged to see yourself as God’s own image and likeness.

The third step is to think all these gifts again and know that God is working in you and make you perfect. You are God’s image and He is trying to perfect his own image.

The fourth step, St. Ignatius says the gift becomes divine, you and God become one, like the rays of the sun and the sun. At the end of the spiritual exercise, you and Divine become one.

This is just a brief sharing of what I have read. Either Brother Lawrence or St. Ignatius, they both help us develop a better communion with God.


#7

Thank you all for your inputs. Thanks to InLight247 for the brief outline - it is very helpful and I will print it out. :slight_smile:


#8

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.