The Three kings


#1

I was taught as a child in Catholic school about the visit of the Magi to the Baby Jesus. The Priest would come to bless our house and write the initials of the Three Kings above our front door.

My question is, does anyone know where the names of the three kings can be found? I have not seen them in the Bible. Their names were Kasper, Melchior, and Baltizar. Do you know of any catholic doctrinal Texts where the source of these names can be found?

Spiritchsr1


#2

[quote=spiritchsr1]I was taught as a child in Catholic school about the visit of the Magi to the Baby Jesus. The Priest would come to bless our house and write the initials of the Three Kings above our front door.

My question is, does anyone know where the names of the three kings can be found? I have not seen them in the Bible. Their names were Kasper, Melchior, and Baltizar. Do you know of any catholic doctrinal Texts where the source of these names can be found?

Spiritchsr1
[/quote]

I believe they are found in the Protoevangelium of James. (sp?)

They are not found in the Scriptures.


#3

Bro. Rich,

What is the Protevangelum of James. I was never taught about thist in my 12 years of Catholic School. Is this something taught in Seminary? Can you elaborate on this a little bit?

Thanks,

Spiritchsr1


#4

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]I believe they are found in the Protoevangelium of James. (sp?)

They are not found in the Scriptures.
[/quote]

They are not named in the Protoevangelium of James either. Only magi is mentioned.


#5

[quote=thistle]They are not named in the Protoevangelium of James either. Only magi is mentioned.
[/quote]

It’s Mary’s parents that are named in the PE. I don’t know where their names come from. But there are markings over the front door here that has their initials and the current year done with a blessing every year on Jan 6th.


#6

the names of the 3 Kings are something else chalked up to tradition. Here we have a tradition of a brightly decorated Tres Reyes cake, with a little plastic baby Jesus baked inside. Whoever finds the baby in his cake must host a party on Candelaria (Feast of the Presentation) and the traditional closing day of the Christmas season.


#7

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, the names are traditional, dating back to at least 7th century Roman martyrologies. This dosn’t mean the names were “invented” then; odds are this is a reflection of a much older tradition. It only means that’s the first time we find it written about.

Here’s the whole article:
newadvent.org/cathen/09527a.htm


#8

Correct me if I am wrong but you cannot even find any mention in scripture of the three being kings. They are called magi (wise men).


#9

[quote=thistle]Correct me if I am wrong but you cannot even find any mention in scripture of the three being kings. They are called magi (wise men).
[/quote]

You are CORRECT. Futhermore it does not say there were three magi, but they brought three gifts. :thumbsup:

Kotton :whistle:


#10

[quote=Kotton]You are CORRECT. Futhermore it does not say there were three magi, but they brought three gifts. :thumbsup:

Kotton :whistle:
[/quote]

You are right! :slight_smile:


#11

[quote=spiritchsr1]Bro. Rich,

What is the Protevangelum of James. I was never taught about thist in my 12 years of Catholic School. Is this something taught in Seminary? Can you elaborate on this a little bit?

Thanks,

Spiritchsr1
[/quote]

It is an apocryphal New Testement writing, wihich dates from 150AD. Although not considered inspired, it is useful for a historical perspective of early Christian beliefs. You can read it here.


#12

[quote=thistle]Correct me if I am wrong but you cannot even find any mention in scripture of the three being kings. They are called magi (wise men).
[/quote]

That is correct it is Origen who first I believe notes three and another Father who calls the kings.


#13

[quote=thistle]Correct me if I am wrong but you cannot even find any mention in scripture of the three being kings. They are called magi (wise men).
[/quote]

The reference to “kings” come from an allusion to Psalm 72:10 which is one of the readings used on the Feast of the Epiphany: **“May the kings of Tarshish and of the isles render him tribute, may the kings of Sheba and Seba bring gifts!” **


#14

[quote=puzzleannie]the names of the 3 Kings are something else chalked up to tradition. Here we have a tradition of a brightly decorated Tres Reyes cake, with a little plastic baby Jesus baked inside. Whoever finds the baby in his cake must host a party on Candelaria (Feast of the Presentation) and the traditional closing day of the Christmas season.
[/quote]

This is our Mardi Gras king cake!


#15

I just read this in a wonderful old book BY FRANCIS X. WEISER

Here’s a link to the book, it’s in the first chapter
library.catholic.org/family/family121.txt

<<The Magi – The name “magi” is not a Hebrew word but of Indo-
Germanic origin, meaning “great, illustrious.” St. Matthew mentions
the term without explanation because it was well known to the
people of Palestine. The Magi originated in Media (Persia) and their caste later spread to other oriental countries. They were a highly esteemed class of priestly scholars, devoting themselves not only to religion but also to the study of natural sciences, medicine, mathematics, astronomy, and astrology. In several countries they were members of the king’s council.>>
there’s more at the link


#16

Jennifer j,

Thanks for the reply to the Three Kings post. This helpsin the research, but I still haven’t found the names of the three Kings yet

spiritchsr1.


#17

Our pastor said on Sunday, this is really disturbing, said that story of the three kings may not be literally true, but true in a deeper sense. Aren’t the three kings in the Roman martyrology? I think our pastor was wrong.


#18

[quote=thistle]Correct me if I am wrong but you cannot even find any mention in scripture of the three being kings. They are called magi (wise men).
[/quote]

I was taught about the “three wise men” not “three wise kings.


#19

[quote=spiritchsr1]Jennifer j,

Thanks for the reply to the Three Kings post. This helpsin the research, but I still haven’t found the names of the three Kings yet

spiritchsr1.
[/quote]

No kings are mentioned, only Magi and the number and names are also not mentioned in scripture. People assume there were three because of the gifts. Scripture also does not say they visited Jesus when he was born and in a manger. See Matthew 2:11.


#20

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