The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Voyage of teh Dawn Treader is my favourite book from all the Chronicles of Narnia. I would like to talk about it and hear also your oppinion. I already have an idea about the symbols in the book but i am interested also in your oppinion. So the questions that i have are:

What are the 7 lords symbolising?

What is the Dragon island symbolise? is it about penance and reconcilliation since Eustace becomes a dragon and then is sorry for his behaviour and accepts the help of Aslan.

What does the Black island symbolises? Is it a symbol of hell, the place where all hope is lost and the greatest fears come to life?

My favourite island is he island of Voices.

Who are the Duffles? Are they symbolising the human race? Scared of God but also defiant, lazy, caring too much about the way they look, not listening to reason. Why are they so stupid: planting boiled potatoes and washing dishes before dinner?

Who is Coriakin? He has a long white beard and bare feet. He wears a red robe and a chaplet of oak leaves, and carries a carved staff. He only eats bread and drinks wine. He looks more like a bishop to me. He is angry on the Duffles for not listening but he loves them. He is both mocked and feared.
But why is this job a punishment for him?

What does the mogicians book symbolise?

Although Aslan definitely symbolises Christ, I'm not sure that it automatically follows that everything in the books is symbolic of something, many things may have simply been put in to make a fun adventure yarn for the kids.

[quote="kaid100, post:2, topic:233989"]
Although Aslan definitely symbolises Christ, I'm not sure that it automatically follows that everything in the books is symbolic of something, many things may have simply been put in to make a fun adventure yarn for the kids.

[/quote]

No doubt many things were put to be fun for kids. However there are many many symbolic things in the book. Have you read the book?

[quote="cristyd, post:3, topic:233989"]
No doubt many things were put to be fun for kids. However there are many many symbolic things in the book. Have you read the book?

[/quote]

I have.

[quote="kaid100, post:4, topic:233989"]
I have.

[/quote]

Very good, thank you for sharing your oppinion with me about the book.

I think that the greatest "meaning" in the Narnia series has to do with what Aslan said about learning to know Him in Narnia so that they could also know Him in their own world. It doesn't necessarily mean that everything in the books represents something, but that there is enough in the books to give anybody something to think about. Seems like the book already has your mind working.

I'm with kaid on this. While a lot of what Lewis wrote is allegory to christian beliefs (not necessarily symbols, but allegory), not everything in the books is about mimicking the bible or Christianity. IMO it's more important as to what it means to you.

For me, I like VOD the most of the narnia stories because of Eustace's repentance and his encounter with Aslan. And, it's just a good adventure tale. Eustace is one of my favorite character, because he repents and turns to God. He's a sinful person that changes his ways, and it gives me hope for myself.

There are books you can buy that talk about the various symbolism and allegories that Lewis puts in his books. A Companion to Narnia is a good book to read.

I have read and loved the book, but I was totally unprepared for the bold departures of the Film Adaptation from the original source. I liked the film version alot, because it wasn’t afraid of allowing the story to expand from the original novel which was more of a blueprint rather than the source material.

Yes, the Black isle does kind of represent Hell in many ways, although it is more like a Purgatory to me, especially how it was presented in the film as a place of testing and trial by fire. In the novel it was more representative of the dark side of the soul, and of the “dark before the dawn” rather than hell(Perhaps also in the novel, much like purgatory). It is a dark place of testing rather than torment, and in the film the White Witch was trapped there in an elemental form(one of those bold departures).

The Magicians book symbolized the temptation of knowledge for Lucy in a personal manner. It was her forbidden fruit.

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