The word office in NT does not mean ruler or authority


#1

but servant? According to some reading I’ve been doing, there are only 3 verses in the NT in which the word office in the greek means hierarchy: Luke 1:8-9 and Heb. 7:5. (hierateia) This is in reference to the OT priesthood which was abrogated by the New Covenant. All the other verses speaking about an office mean servant (diakonis).

According to this, and the verse that speaks about how the Gentiles lord over each other and we shouldn’t be like that, means that Peter was to be a servant, not a ruler of the church. For instance, when he speaks about magnifying his office by preaching to the Gentiles, it means that he is providing more service to people other than jews, not that his authority is increasing.

I don’t know much about greek, so could someone help me out?

Thanks,
oneseeker


#2

The authorities of the Church are supposed to be servants of God, yes. Their job is to know and serve the spiritual needs of the people without being asked, and to guide them into the ways of God.

“Diakonis” (Deacon) means “a servant,” yes.

One of the Pope’s most important titles is Servant of the Servants of God.

Church authorities are not supposed to come into the job with a personal agenda that is different from the Church’s agenda - they are not there to glorify themselves, but to glorify God. That’s why you almost never see the pastor’s name on a sign in front of a Catholic church - because it’s not about him; it’s about God.


#3

check out my quote…

In Christ


#4

Peter was a servant. In fact he was the Servant of the Servants of God. Nonetheless, as an Air Force officer, I understand that being a servant is NOT antithetical to having command authority over others. And having command authority is not that same as “Lording” over another. I serve my subordinates when I give them clear commands that promote good order and discipline and promote the success of the mission. There are “leaders” and there are those who are called to follow. Both serve in accord with the gifts and authority given to them.

You might also consider the study of other words in Scripture. For example, Peter “commanded” Cornelius to be sacramentally baptized in the Book of Acts.

He commanded (Gk*** Prostasso*****)** them to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ.” (Acts 10:48)

If you remember, Cornelius just received the gift of the Holy Spirit poured out upon him extra-sacramentally, yet Peter commanded Cornelius to be sacramentally baptized. I find it interesting that Peter presumed he had “command authority” with regard to governance in religious matters over another brethren who clearly already possessed the gift of the Holy Spirit. Did Cornelius, a Centurion, understand Peter had “command authority” over him or did he complain to Peter for usurping some authority that was never his to begin with?

You might note that that word in Greek prostasso for “command” is only used 7 times in the NT, pertaining to the commands of the Lord, Angels of the Lord, Moses, and Peter. That Peter ALONE is among the list of those who could command is significant, no? It seems clear from this that Peter had special command authority within the Church, and exercised it.

Hierarchy is evident and Scripture tells us that those who are placed in leadership roles are placed there by the authority of God. Peter clearly was among those in a command position within the Church.

Scripture states, “***Obey them that have RULE (Gk ***hegeomai) ***over you and submit yourselves: for they watch for your souls, as they that must give account, that they may do it with joy, and not with grief: for that is unprofitable for you.***” (Heb 17:13).

The Greek word “hegeomai” is where the English word “hegemony” comes from, which means “authority over others.”

It seems the ecclesiology of the Sacred Author of Hebrews is one which affirms a hierarchical Church. :wink:


#5

It also struck me as rather “hierarchical” that St. John the Apostle would call a Presbyter (Gk presbuteros) in heaven “LORD” (Gk kurios) (cf. Rev 7:13-14) :eek:


#6

You might also consider the study of other words in Scripture. For example, Peter “commanded” Cornelius to be sacramentally baptized in the Book of Acts.

He commanded (Gk*** Prostasso*****)** them to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ.” (Acts 10:48)

If you remember, Cornelius just received the gift of the Holy Spirit poured out upon him extra-sacramentally, yet Peter commanded Cornelius to be sacramentally baptized. I find it interesting that Peter presumed he had “command authority” with regard to governance in religious matters over another brethren who clearly already possessed the gift of the Holy Spirit. Did Cornelius, a Centurion, understand Peter had “command authority” over him or did he complain to Peter for usurping some authority that was never his to begin with?

You might note that that word in Greek prostasso for “command” is only used 7 times in the NT, pertaining to the commands of the Lord, Angels of the Lord, Moses, and Peter. That Peter ALONE is among the list of those who could command is significant, no? It seems clear from this that Peter had special command authority within the Church, and exercised it.

Hierarchy is evident and Scripture tells us that those who are placed in leadership roles are placed there by the authority of God. Peter clearly was among those in a command position within the Church.

Scripture states, “***Obey them that have RULE (Gk ***hegeomai) ***over you and submit yourselves: for they watch for your souls, as they that must give account, that they may do it with joy, and not with grief: for that is unprofitable for you.***” (Heb 17:13).

The Greek word “hegeomai” is where the English word “hegemony” comes from, which means “authority over others.”

It seems the ecclesiology of the Sacred Author of Hebrews is one which affirms a hierarchical Church. :wink: Excellent!!! and Happy Veterans Day! May Our Lord bless you abundantly!!!


#7

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