the word whore

Is the word whore used in the bible describing woman who have committed adultery? I used the word whore in a post and was criticized by one man. He said that that was a terrible word to use in describing the woman that Jesus would not let the people stone and referring to Mary Magdalen in which I know was not a whore but had demons within her that Jesus drove out. I don’t think the man was insulting me he simply thought it was a vulgar way to say it. What’s wrong with using that word. Is it that common.

‘Whore’ means prostitute or a promiscuous woman, essentially, and yeah, it is somewhat considered to be kind of rude word to use casually these days.

And no. The woman is not identified as a prostitute in the passage. She is “a woman caught in adultery.”

“whire” is degrading, dehumanizing, and disrespectful. We should not judge others (easy for me to say).

I suppose a man can be a whore as much as a woman can be. Pray for purity.

“whore” is usually a word used to describe a prostitute (ie one who sleeps with people for money) or someone who is promiscuous (ie one who sleeps with lots of partners).

We do not know that the woman caught in adultery was a prostitute. Nor that she had “lots of” partners (we can only safely assume two - her husband and the man she was caught with). So I think it is inaccurate, and somewhat insulting.

There is no mention of Mary Magdalene being guilty of any sexual sin at all, so I think it is unfair (and again insulting) to apply it to her.

Dear Flower Lady,

The passage you refer to (John 8: 1-11) does not contain the word whore or prostitute in any form, in any translation, so using it to refer to the adulteress is both untruthful and vulgar.

However, there are numerous other Biblical passages which refer to prostitution / prostitutes both literally and allegorically, and in those passages, some translations do use the word “whore”.

Whore is a rather mean word to say. It’s an insult to someone who is a sex worker, and quite insensitive. Some people have no choice, and were kidnapped or grew up in rough situations where they ended up in sex trafficing or weren’t given the same opportunities as women brought up in a healthy household as children. We shouldn’t judge, because we don’t know the full story of people’s lives. It’s easy to look at the outside situation and judge based on that little knowledge, but really we shouldn’t because it’s none of our business. God takes care of us all, and we must leave everything in his hands.

In the bible, the only whore was the whore of Babylon I think, because I can’t recall any other passage where the words ‘‘whore’’ were explicitly used. Adultery has been used to describe some aspects of biblical women. I think ‘whore’ is used in revelations when describing the great whore of Babylon because she comes riding on a beast, carrying with her a goblet full of disgusting abominations, blasphemy,corruption and represents the most vile sins and gluttony. She is the mother of all prostitutes in not only a sexual way, but to those who sell themselves in other ways. It’s quite clear on how evil and disgusting the great whore is.

As for the woman whom Jesus saved from being stoned, and as for Mary Magdalene, they were not whores. They committed adultery, but perhaps they had to, to survive. They were given forgiveness and became pure by christ’s salvation and sinned no more. So I would not describe them as a whore. In the biblical days especially, women were subjugated and treated badly. Sold as slaves, sold into prostitution, etc. But those who were saved by god, who became aware and known of their sins and followed christ, were not whores. That’s just my 2 cents though lol.

Why is this so important to you? :confused:
Enough to make a whole thread of this vulgarity?

Mary Magdalene was NOT a prostitute. That was Mary of Egypt.

For the word discussed the OP particularly meant the unnamed woman in John 7:53-8:11 not Mary Magdalene.

Gentle speech is always a good thing. People can gain or lose respect by the words they choose.

As for St. Mary Magdalene…she came from Magdala. It was assumed that she had similar sins of the people there. It was never stated she actually did.

The actual word word whore does appear in the bible , but only specific versions of the bible . Where the word whore is absent, we find an equivalent in its place ; commonly *harlot *or prostitute.

The King James Version of the bible appears to be the version where the word whore appears most frequently , rather than its aforementioned synonyms.

Sad as it is, prostitution is one of the oldest, um, trades, in the business:

In biblical times, if a woman was without any husband or children, family, to support her, she could’ve easily been forced by her circumstances into prostitution - with no other way to survive.

There were also prostitutes who offered themselves, as they do today, for money or favors.

And there was another type of prostitute called a temple prostitute (male and/or female) who plied their trade in the temples of false gods and false religions having sex with their worshipers.

The bible repeatedly relates the imagery of prostitution as applying to the people of God who are/were collectively unfaithful :

In the Old Testament Israel’s unfaithfulness to God is often presented metaphorically in terms of prostitution ; the unfaithful being compared to a prostitute or to one who runs after prostitutes seeking their service.

That same analogy could appear to apply to us collectively - as the people of God, if Revelation 17 is to be an indicator.

Three examples for comparison of biblical versions of Revelation 17:1-2 :

KJV

And there came one of the seven angels which had the seven vials, and talked with me, saying unto me, Come hither; I will shew unto thee the judgment of the great whore that sitteth upon many waters: With whom the kings of the earth have committed fornication, and the inhabitants of the earth have been made drunk with the wine of her fornication.


DRV

And there came one of the seven angels, who had the seven vials, and spoke with me, saying: Come, I will shew thee the condemnation of the great harlot, who sitteth upon many waters, With whom the kings of the earth have committed fornication; and they who inhabit the earth, have been made drunk with the wine of her whoredom.


NAB

Then one of the seven angels who were holding the seven bowls came and said to me, “Come here. I will show you the judgment on the great harlot who lives near the many waters. The kings of the earth have had intercourse with her, and the inhabitants of the earth became drunk on the wine of her harlotry.”

I don’t think we need to be overly politically correct when speaking of biblical personalities. Father John Hardon S.J.'s Modern Catholic Dictionary says “whore” is a valid word and he defines it thus, in biblical terms:

WHORE (biblical).
A woman regularly guilty of adultery or fornication, especially for money. In early biblical times selling daughters into prostitution was not uncommon. It is reprobated in the Old Testament (Leviticus 19:29). Genesis makes it clear that capital punishment was the penalty for whoredom (Genesis 38:24-25).

That being said , we need to be mindful of precisely whom we ascribe this undignified title to : RomanoAmerio, LilyM and Patrick457 have all confirmed that “whore” does not apply to the woman caught in adultery, and you yourself , flower lady , confirm the title could not apply to Mary Magdalen.Re this thread’s specific topic,the fine line, can be found in Father Hardon’s definition : To apply the title aptly the woman would have to be regularly guilty of adultery - and we simply do not know this concerning the woman caught in adultery whom Jesus forgave.

Where the title would appear to be applicable to a biblical personage (though I can tell you that, simply because I have a mother and a sister, as a man in today’s world, I feel uncomfortable using that term for any woman - regardless of her profession ) , would be in the case of Rahab the harlot who actually did more for the people of God in her day , than all the non-harlots combined.

:wink: , :slight_smile:

Actually I used the word in another post and was criticized by a man. He was kind in saying why use the word whore wasn’t a very good choice of words to use. Ok, I agree, but if you read my post I said that Mary M had demons within her that Jesus drove out of her, I think three times. I did not refer to her as a whore. It was the woman that the people wanted to stone, that Jesus stopped. My point in the other post was to try and tell my friend that Mary M was not a harlot.

Hi!

…I think it goes to definition…

…by definition adultery does not imply an act of selling/trading sex nor taking on multiple sex partners (other than the secondary adulterous relationship)…

The terms whore, slut and prostitute do explicitly mean an engagement of sex for pleasure with multiple partners and for material gain (money, power, “favors”).

It is interesting that these terms are not always applied to men when they engage in the same practices that females do when the terms are applied to them.

So while today’s vernacular does tend to use the terms interchangeably (adulteress…); note that it is derogatory and for the most part used against females.

…it’s the old machismo: a man has multiple wives/partners and he is hailed as “the man;” if a woman does the same… " she’s a whore."

Maran atha!

Angel

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