Theresa May faces public backlash over hard Brexit, poll finds


#1

theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/11/theresa-may-hard-brexit-public-backlash-icm-poll

**Theresa May faces public backlash over hard Brexit, poll finds

A clear majority of the British public oppose Theresa May’s uncompromising Brexit negotiating position and are not prepared for the UK to crash out of the EU if the prime minister cannot negotiate a reasonable exit deal, according to a new poll.

In a sign that public support for the government’s push for a hard Brexit is increasingly precarious, just 35% of the public said they backed Britain leaving the EU without an agreement with other states. The UK would then fall back on to World Trade Organisation (WTO) tariffs, which MPs and business leaders have claimed would devastate the economy.

The survey – conducted by ICM for the online campaigning organisation Avaaz on the day the House of Commons voted overwhelmingly to trigger article 50 – suggests May would face a considerable backlash if Britain crashed out of the EU on WTO terms. In a welcome boost for soft Brexit campaigners, over half (54%) of those surveyed backed either extending negotiations if a satisfactory deal could not be reached, or halting the process altogether while the public was consulted for a second time.

The Liberal Democrat foreign affairs spokesman, Tom Brake, said the findings proved the government’s position was indefensible.

Of the 54% of people who opposed the government’s position, 34% said May should continue negotiating. A further 20% backed halting the process pending a second referendum on the terms of the deal, an option backed by the Lib Dems and a cross-party group of MPs including the Labour MPs David Lammy, Heidi Alexander and Ben Bradshaw, as well as the Green Party leader, Caroline Lucas.**


#2

Avaaz is clearly against Brexit, that can be seen on the organisation’s website. Doesn’t mean the poll is wrong but Avaaz themselves, who did not conduct the polling, are not an independent organisation.


#3

Britain survived before Brexit, it will survive after Brexit dies. They have to re-neogiate trade, immigration etc. What people are feeling is natural, you get used to something for years it’s difficult to adjust to changes and the uncertainty. The public spokespeople for the “ban brexit” argument didn’t didn’t do a good enough job, they failed to"speak to their audience" in simple English and couldn’t convince them to vote otherwise is on them. They failed to tap into voter backlash and discontent.


#4

Hard Brexit is a must if the UK is serious about this.

Of course there will be backlash----from all the elites and their accolades who stand to lose easy money.

There’s nothing surprising or unique about any of this. :nope:


#5

Vouthon,

Since you are there, what happens when May can’t create a soft Brexit because the EU won’t let her? They have no incentive to let the UK off the hook easily.

Do the people vote her out of office and drop the whole Brexit matter or do they just accept the hard Brexit? Are there other alternatives? What do you think?


#6

With a hard Brexit, it will be best. The UK has no intention of breaking away from Europe as many alarmists may claim. They just wanted out from under Brussels and for very good reason.

That’s all this was about.

But if they go soft, it will just create a bunch of uncertainty and could be harmful if people have to double-negotiate with London and Brussels in order to figure out who is in charge.

I really don’t see the problem with Brexit or why the UK can’t have a lighter Swiss style relationship with the EU.

If the Swiss can do it, so can the UK. :thumbsup:


#7

:wave:

Well, that’s a myth really. The fact is the UK has more leverage over the EU because it’s no secret that Germany runs the EU and the car companies have a big voice in Germany. A huge chunk of their customers are in the UK, and the last thing they want is trouble in the market and it’s the last thing current German politicians ultimately want because it could mean the end of their careers.

The UK is on pretty solid ground, but I really don’t see them—even Farage and Hannan—making threats but extending an olive branch with the understanding that UK sovereignty will be respected.

Brexit won’t be dropped. It’s been over 7 months since it passed and most of the people accept it. It is an economic benefit to the UK because the EU is just a protection racket that has become a perpetual bail-out for ineffective industries. They miss the UK because the UK was giving them nearly $500 million a week to be a member. As a member of the EU (except in hard currency) the UK couldn’t even get a trade deal with India because of Italian textile complaints.


#8

As usual virtually every single sentence above is inaccurate -

Your obsession with Farage is curious - he isn’t even an MP and his party has a grand total of 1 seat. He has nothing new to say except to try to stir the rifts in UKip who are now on their third leader in six months.
Where did you get your figures from about the UK contribution? Complete nonsense once again and even UKip did not make such outlandish claims.
I have debunked your claim previously about the UK not being able to get a Trade deal.
As to people accepting it is going to happen - and FYI the UK is still in the EU until at least 2019 - you haven’t exactly got your finger on the pulse or read what virtually all businesses in the UK say.about Brexit.


#9

The Swiss are currently subject to more regulation than the UK with all its opt outs. Teresa May has already said that that model is a non-starter. Next?


#10

I didn’t know you were from the UK. Ok, so Brexit will be soft so the Germans can sell cars in the UK. Well, it seems like May has some work ahead of her then because she’s not getting the deal you expect.


#11

He’s not from the UK :wink:


#12

Oh. I thought he was based on following up my post asking for your insight as someone in the UK so I could avoid the inevitable American media’s spin on it. If you get a chance, please answer my questions if you want to.


#13

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