This aided my peace in the Eucharist

Monday I was watching the Journey Home on EWTN. The guest, Michael Matthews, was excellent and made a statement that I found to be wonderfully enlightening to me and demonstrates how “fixated” we can become and thus limit God.

In speaking about the Real Presence, He commented that, “For me personally, my belief in the Eucharist, is the ultimate test of my belief in teh divinity of Christ. Because if you took jesus’ physical body as it was two thousand years ago and looked at it under a microscope you would find flesh and blood. It takes a supreme act of faith to believe that this carpenter from Nazareth is actually God the son, the second person of the trinity. God incarnate. Well if you can believe that, is it that much of a step to believe that this same God can become bread and wine for us.”
(If you’d like to see the interview, it is HERE. The comments above are at about the 11:40 minute mark)

When he said this, it struck me - How I, and many others seem get hung up on the idea that the transformation of the bread and wine. We (I at least) seem to have this idea that the transformation must be to a literal, human flesh and blood, and hence the hang up about the “appearance” being bread and wine.
Our thinking seems to be that it must go from bread and wine to human flesh and blood to Jesus…Yet God need not work this way. Christ was literally, scientifically human and God. He can just as easily be literally, scientifically bread and wine and still be God…without going “through” the human Jesus step…

Does that make any sense? It does in my head, but I’m nots sure I’m explaining it right. maybe I should just leave Michael Matthews comments speak for themselves…

Peace
James

I’ve often thought of it this way, although I imagine many here will want to burn me as a heretic for saying this :slight_smile:

The bread and wine does not become the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ…

…The Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ becomes the Bread and Wine

Though I might be wrong…

God bless and thanks for the thought provoking post!

i have meditated on this as well…if God can put Himself into the womb of a Virgin, He can surely put Himself into a piece of bread…

Blessed be the Holy Name of Jesus…

God Bless

Beautifully said…exquisitely enlightening! Thanks for bringing this guest of JH to our attention. I missed this guest…but have downloaded it to MP3 player…and will enjoy it on a long walk with my beagle buddy.:slight_smile:

One of my Navy priest-chaplains ( a former Marine combat veteran himself)…always explained it to us dumb “Jarhead” Marines…this way:

the God who** said “let there be light”** and so** there was light**…is the same God who says "this is my Body…this is my Blood"…and so It is…yes, thank God Almighty…SO IT IS!

He said it with a faith of absolute conviction…and by the grace of God…it convinced us…in faith…that it is true…just as the Catholic Church and faith has always taught.

Lastly…

** Myqyl**
I’ve often thought of it this way, although I imagine many here will want to burn me as a heretic for saying this :slight_smile:

The** bread and wine does not become** the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ…

…The Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ becomes the Bread and Wine

Though I might be wrong…

God bless and thanks for the thought provoking post!

No…no way that you are a heretic…it is simply your personal way of reflecting and understanding what is happening…but…(for your consideration)…just like the Priest at the consecration must be very precise and cautionary in speaking the exact sacred words of consecration spoken by Christ and given to us through His Church – Peter and the Twelve and their successors – (have you noticed how many…most all priests…even the “old pros”…even the Holy Father…turn their eyes to the Missal and view the Sacred Words…as they Speak in the Person of Christ…those transcendent and eternal Words)…

[LEFT]…so also, I believe that we also must always try to be very precise when we speak about or try to say publicly what is actually happening at the moment of Consecration when bread and wine are changed into the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ. [/LEFT]

[LEFT]The best way…use the words/teaching of the Magisterium. Here is how the** Catechism** teaches what happens:[/LEFT]

1376 The Council of Trent summarizes the Catholic faith by declaring: "Because Christ our Redeemer said that it was truly his body that he was offering under the species of bread, it has always been the conviction of the Church of God, and this holy Council now declares again,** that by the consecration** of the bread and wine** there takes place a change** of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord and of the whole substance of the wine into the substance of his blood. This change the holy Catholic Church has fittingly and **properly called transubstantiation."206 **

Again…for your consideration.
Pax Christi

Indeed the Incarnation points to the real presence most succinctly !:thumbsup:

God Bless
:slight_smile:

I was very impressed by Mr. Matthews, particularly what he had to say about being saved as a member of the Church.

Yes…he was very well spoken. Also had good answers for the questions and answer segments.

Peace
James

That was an excellent episode, I really enjoyed it.

I have a friend who was an atheist before becoming Catholic and I once asked about the Real Presence and if she found it difficult to believe. She just smiled and said that if one can believe in God in the first place, then everything alse is easy. Real Presence was something that she accepted as true because she believed that God is indeed all powerful and that nothing is impossible with Him. I thought that was very profound and logical, althought so many Christians decide what God can and can’t do and see no problem in that kind of thinking.

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