Thoughts? : Jesus was there when I was a Protestant, Jesus is THERE now that I'm a Catholic

When I was going to Protestant churches I was told (and read in the Bible) that when two people gather in Jesus’ name, Jesus is there.

When we sang songs, we were directing them towards God as well as proclaiming our faith/joy that we have.

I was taught that the Holy Spirit lived in me, and that my prayers could be directed intimately to God because He lives in me.

Now that I’m a Catholic, I get to see Jesus in the Eucharist, consume His flesh and blood so that He’s physically living in me, and through confirmation, the Holy Spirit has helped me more by God increasing my grace.

I see interesting parallels, with drastically different meanings of the presence of Jesus.

Well the Church doesn’t deny that where two or three gather in his name Christ is there. He is.
The other way he is present with us is Holy Scripture. Especially when a priest or deacon proclaims the Gospel at Mass. Jesus is the one speaking from the Gospel.
But the fullness of his presence is in the Eucharist.
In this regard, there is not much difference, just that one is missing the Eucharist, which is the most important aspect in christian life.
As for the Holy Spirit living in us, I say the entire Trinity lives in us, if we are in a state of sanctifying grace. So, in the Catholic Church you get more, in fact, you get the entirety of the Truth. God bless! :slight_smile:

:thumbsup::thumbsup:

For me - it is less about “parallels” than it is about depth and fullness.

That said, I’d love to hear more from you about the insights you are gaining…That is if you can put them into words…I know how hard that can be sometimes.

Peace
James

I realize that the Catholic Church has a much deeper and fuller understanding of the Christian faith. I also personally focused almost exclusively on how I felt as a way to reach God. For example, I’d believe that to feel close with God I’d need to feel something, otherwise I’d be in a “dry spell”.

Now I have understood that I don’t come to Mass to experience something as much as I come to participate in something, and in my life outside of going to Mass, I try to not look at how I feel because I’ve realized that it means very little. I’m not sure if this is a common thing or just my maturing.

I do know that the music and prayers in the Catholic Church provide a much more reverent atmosphere though. I can see the respect and honor given to God in the liturgy, and especially in holding up of the Eucharist during Mass when Jesus is presented to the people.

I also remember being “prayed over” for the “Baptism of the Holy Spirit” where the sign of this happening was speaking in tongues. It was a nondenominational church, and charismatic. Explaining this reminds me a little bit of my Confirmation.

That particular church focused on excitement, energy, the Holy Spirit, and goals of expanding. They probably did good, but I feel like it wasn’t ordered correctly. I also feel like while that particular church probably had good intentions, they didn’t teach about loving people in a real way, like the Catholic Church does, especially in the example of Pope Francis. For example, they assume that if you leave the church, then you’re probably living in sin and should be either invited back or left to their sinful ways.

Jesus was there while I was a Mormon except I did not know him. Did not know he was God in the flesh. Reminds me of the scripture 1 Corinthians 13:12 “For now we see through a glass darkly; but then face to face…” I see what you mean about it being less about parallels. For me, truth is valuable. To learn that Jesus is God is valuable in recognizing that Jesus is there.

If I may ask, what convinced you about Jesus’ divinity?

For me He is truly present in Meeting…not having a cup of wine and a a piece of bread with special words spoken over it and special gestures used spoken and gestures by a special and specific minister of a particular religious organization does not make Jesus any more present. But I’m not Catholic so to place such value upon such things is foreign to me.

I agree with JRKH.
Seems to me it’s a matter of fullness and depth.

Yes, it is clearly foreign to you. Therefore (since you admit to not understanding it) you might want to consider being a tad less dismissive of it.
:wink:

The Catholic perspective is that it’s not just special words, gestures, and ministers. It’s the Church Jesus Christ established that continues what He started, it is Jesus who spoke those words, told the Church to do these things, setup what Paul would later write about partaking in while discerning it rightly, and that put in place the very ministers that would be the link between all future ministers who are in apostolic succession.

These words, the theology, and the ministers were all started by Jesus, and Catholics believe He knew what He was doing, and meant what He said. :slight_smile:

Hope that helps somehow.

Its different for us Catholics we have the Sacraments, and you don’t have any, so our way at looking at things are going to be different. Peace.

:thumbsup::signofcross:

And you are missing sooo much, Come learn about us and the fullness of the Faith in the Catholic Church. Read the writings of the Early Church Fathers and you will see what Christ’s Church really looks like. A whole new world will open up for you. God Bless, Memaw

Well I wouldn’t say ‘drastically different’.
I would say: all of the above are correct :slight_smile: Our God is an awesome God:thumbsup:

I would also add the Sacraments to this, an outward sign of inward grace in that it bears its image and is its cause. It is a sacred and mysterious sign or ceremony, ordained by Christ, by which grace is conveyed to our souls. :thumbsup:

Sure! The Bible. Jesus said he is “I Am” which is another name for God. I realized if I believed in Jesus, I must believe that he is God. Thomas proclaimed Jesus as Lord, which in that time was a title only given to deity.

This was only after I realized my own false beliefs (especially of pre-mortal life) and I was willing to listen to what Christians had to say about Jesus.

Oh I understand the theology behind the belief…I’ve been on CAF a number of years, but still I can’t get my mind or heart around it. To be required to participate in such a ritual that must be conducted by another human being , and unless my participation in such a ritual is done l an regular basis my eternal soul is in danger denies to me all that grace implies.

I’m not “dimissjve” , I simply do not accept the claims. Of your church that such a rite is salvic in nature.

Thank you friend for seeking to clarify for me.

Yes - too much emphasis can be put on feelings…But I suggest not dismissing them either. When one does not “feel” God is close - this is indeed a dry spell (aridity) and is spoken of by many saints.
BUT
The feelings need not be “happy” ones. We can feel God close in our hard times as well. Likewise we can have aridity during times of physical joy.
This realization is indeed part of the maturing process…

I do know that the music and prayers in the Catholic Church provide a much more reverent atmosphere though. I can see the respect and honor given to God in the liturgy, and especially in holding up of the Eucharist during Mass when Jesus is presented to the people.

Amen - just remember that even this (feelings of reverence and peace etc) can be associated with “feelings” and there likely will be times of aridity even at Mass.

I also remember being “prayed over” for the “Baptism of the Holy Spirit” where the sign of this happening was speaking in tongues. It was a nondenominational church, and charismatic. Explaining this reminds me a little bit of my Confirmation.

:thumbsup:
Don’ know if you are aware of it, but there is a charismatic movement within the Church. I don’t know much about it…but some find it very uplifting.

That particular church focused on excitement, energy, the Holy Spirit, and goals of expanding. They probably did good, but I feel like it wasn’t ordered correctly. I also feel like while that particular church probably had good intentions, they didn’t teach about loving people in a real way, like the Catholic Church does, especially in the example of Pope Francis. For example, they assume that if you leave the church, then you’re probably living in sin and should be either invited back or left to their sinful ways.

Welcome Home…:smiley:

Peace
James

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
Aye…you have said the most important thing.

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