Thoughts on the RSV and Daily Catholic Bible?


#1

(Sorry if this is in the wrong forum, I didn’t know where else to post it)

I’ve embarrassingly had difficulty reading the Bible. I start to read it and quickly feel overwhelmed with how lengthy it is. I end up reading a page or two and fall asleep. So, I bought the My Daily Catholic Bible that has readings for every day of the year. They say the readings take about 20 minutes, and having a set reading amount is the kind of motivation I need to continue reading.

What are your thoughts on this Bible? I know this will sound silly, but isn’t the RSV translation the same one as the Ignatius Bible? Any major problems with this translation or format?

Thanks.


#2

The Douay-Rheims is the best Catholic, English translation.


#3

I have the Douay-Rheims Bible, and I do refer to it whenever I have a translation inquiry, but it’s one of the most difficult translations to read through. I wanted to know if there was anything wrong with the RSV translation, not which translation is the best.


#4

The RSV is a perfectly fine translation. And, unlike the NAB, does not contain “inclusive language” at the expense of the plain meaning of the text.

Good for you for plugging away at your Bible reading. :thumbsup: Keep it up!

Margaret


#5

What exactly is giving you difficulty reading the Bible besides the lengthliness?? The RSV-CE is an ok version, probably the best of the modern version. I however prefer the Douay-Rheims or Latin Vulgate


#6

The RSV-CE (CE stands for Catholic Edition), which is the translation used for the Ignatius Bible, is a very good translation. It's very accurate and the language is well rendered.


#7

[quote="tmancath, post:5, topic:177179"]
What exactly is giving you difficulty reading the Bible besides the lengthliness?? The RSV-CE is an ok version, probably the best of the modern version. I however prefer the Douay-Rheims or Latin Vulgate

[/quote]

This is actually a great question, and now I feel lazy. So, I decided to try and read the Doauy-Rheims in a year. I added up all of the pages, divided by 365 and discovered that I only have to read 4 pages a day. I'm going to give this method a try as I really would like to read from the beginning.

Thanks to everyone replied to this thread.


#8

good for you that you have decided to read the Bible in a year. 4 pages doesn’t sound like a lot but it actually is quite plentiful. Are you sure you are confortable with the Douay-Rheims?? If not stick to your RSV-CE


#9

I actually use both, as silly as it may sound. :slight_smile: I read every morning, and use a format that I’m pretty comfortable with. I read a book form the NT, followed by a book from the OT, and mix Psalms and the wisdom books in at times.

As I’m in no rush to get through the Bible, have read it through once in it’s entirety, I start with reading a book, let’s say Gospel of Mathew, from the Douay. When done, I read the SAME book from the RSV-CE. Been working my way through this way for a few months now, and I really enjoy it! It kind of gives me the best of both, and when I’m done reading through a “book” two times in a row, I feel I have really gained something from it, and tend to remember quite a bit better. :slight_smile: Doing this method will take me a bit more than a year most likely, however, there are days I read quite a bit more, or less, depending on how busy my mornings get.

Either way, to the OP, congrats, and good luck with your Bible reading endeavors. I find it really goes along well with my normal morning prayer ritual. It starts my day, everyday, and keeps me grounded where I need to be. :thumbsup:


#10

We’ll see how it goes. I did not have any problems last night. If I have any difficulties, I can always refer to my RSV-CE.

I also like the idea of reading both the DR and the RSV-CE in the same night, but I don’t want to over commit myself. As it is, I pray the Rosary, Tessera, Lauds, Vespers and the Divine Intimacy every day.


#11

Wow that’s a lot!!!


#12

Not really. I pray the Tessera, Rosary, and Lauds before Mass in the mornings and all three only takes about 30 minutes. Then I come home after work and pray Vespers and read from the Divine Intimacy. With the Bible readings last night, it only took me about an hour and this included meditation time to reflect on what I just read. It’s very rewarding and manageable.


#13

In addition to the Bible I do the LOTH and or Divine Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, prayer for vocations, prayers from St.Francis and St. Clare and prayer to Padre Pio. Since I haven’t been working I also try and read a book. Right now I am on my 15th book this year.


#14

[quote="damooster, post:3, topic:177179"]
I have the Douay-Rheims Bible, and I do refer to it whenever I have a translation inquiry, but it's one of the most difficult translations to read through.

[/quote]

Who said the Bible should be easy to read? It has so many layers of meaning and contains many different literary genera that I would sacrifice a "vulgar" vernacular translation for one that is accurate like the D-R.

[quote="damooster, post:3, topic:177179"]
I wanted to know if there was anything wrong with the RSV translation, not which translation is the best.

[/quote]

According to this excellent comparison of many different English bible translations, in which the D-R comes out top, the CRSV (Catholic Revised Standard Version) has a lot of mistakes. Take for example Genesis 3:15, the classic test of the Catholicity of a bible. The CRSV says "I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her seed; he shall bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heel." Mother Mary does not crush the head of Satan; she just bruises him! The D-R renders it correctly (and Catholic) as: "I will put enmities between thee and the woman, and thy seed and her seed: she shall crush thy head, and thou shalt lie in wait for her heel." (The Bp. Challoner note reads: "She shall crush... Ipsa, the woman; so divers of the fathers read this place, conformably to the Latin: others read it ipsum, viz., the seed. The sense is the same: for it is by her seed, Jesus Christ, that the woman crushes the serpent's head.") There are many other examples the above-linked What bible should you read? document mentions.


#15

Thanks for that link! I realize that “pamphlet” is an advertisement, but I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. I’ve come to appreciate the DR more and more over the past year, and reading this affirms my belief that it is the one I should be reading. I STILL have to wonder why the Catholic Church no longer uses it exclusively. Perhaps someone needs to send a copy of this to the Pope. :smiley:


#16

I a strong proponent of reading the Douay-Rheims I do know that the Douay is the most accurate. I have read this article provided and it is nothing short of Douay-Rheims-onlyism. Much like KJV-onlyism. However, I do think the Confraternity Edition (Douay OT and Confraternity NT) and the Ronald Knox Translation are good to, just not as good as the D-R. I don’t advocate Douay-Rheims-onlyism, so I would advise to stay away from this article.


#17

[quote="damooster, post:7, topic:177179"]
This is actually a great question, and now I feel lazy. So, I decided to try and read the Doauy-Rheims in a year. I added up all of the pages, divided by 365 and discovered that I only have to read 4 pages a day. I'm going to give this method a try as I really would like to read from the beginning..

[/quote]

Some traditional Catholics rely on another way to learn the bible- attentively listening to the scripture readings, responsorial psalms and gospel reading during weekend and weekday Masses-----

(a) Weekend readings are organised on a 3-year basis. To complete 1 cycle of readings, you must attend 3 years of Sunday Masses which you would as a good Catholic.

(b) Weekday readings are based on a 2-year basis. You would need to attend mass every weekday for 2 whole years so as not to miss out on any reading.

(c) Not every one of the 73 books of the bible is covered in the lectionary readings. [Kindly correct me if I'm wrong]

(d) None of the 73 books of the bible are completely covered in the lectionary readings, not even the shortest book- the Letter of Paul to Philemon. Only selected extracts are read. [Kindly correct me if I'm wrong]

(e) There is some overlap within the weekday readings as the same reading may be re-used on different feastdays and also some overlap between weekday and weekend readings

Hence this method cannot give a complete reading of the whole bible. However, there are some advantages- the priest usually explains the readings in his homily during Mass. So you may get an official Catholic interpretation (or close to it) of the readings if the priest knows his bible well.

The greatest advantage comes to those who have the patience to endure this method - increase in faith. *"So faith comes from what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ" *(Romans 11:17, NRSV)


#18

The link you provided was published in 2001. Updates to the RSV-CE have been made since then.
No translation is perfect…


#19

Percisely. That is we way the pros and cons before we choose what translation to read. I prefer the Douay-Rheims myself in English, but would rather read the Latin Vulgate (Clementine Edition) and I have. I was quite leary about the RSV-CE at first. My main concerned was that not all Protestant doctrines had been removed, even though it bares and Imprimatur and Nihil Obstat. I fully recommend the D-R, but not everyone will agree with me and sometimes more than one translation is ok to read. The RSV-CE isn’t perfect, but it is good enough for Scott Hahn and Fr. Mitch, so it must be mostly accurate


#20

Priests of English-speaking congregations are permitted to use the D-R if they choose.


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