Threat of condemnation at the pearly gates?


#1

the Pastors homily today was about judging others. “If we do, we just better wait and see what is waiting for us at the pearly gates!” This message seems contradictory to the “I desire mercy, not sacrifice” reading of the day.

We all use judgement and analysis for many reasons, If we do so even with the right intentions, does that mean that we will be sent to hell?

Will I see the Pastor at the pearly gates? Is it his decision? The homily made me recall when I was three and my teenage brother would tell me scary stories before bed.


#2

Assuming that you’re not in attack mode against your priest (as many of your previous posts have been), I would just take it as an exhortation about not judging others.


#3

And maybe get Jesus’ take on judgement, Matthew 25 verses 31-46


#4

In my experience it seems that if a parishoner is much in favor that is through ones virtue and many acts of charity and parish involvement that such person or persons can actually very much influence the priest, and even though the favored parishoner may be very condeming and judgemental of the individual(s) that is disliked the parish priest it seems will justify and add to this condeming pattern of judgement on the unfortunate disliked individual or individuals. Is there a such a thing as parish politics that mirrors the worldly sphere of office politics?


#5

I think the homily could go well with the reading. In not judging others badly we show mercy to them. To give others the benefit of the doubt, to assume that they are acting in good faith, to hate the sin but not the sinner, is to be merciful.

We should use judgment to determine if a course of action is right. We can analyze situations. We can say that certain actions are immoral. We can judge historical figures (eg. What Hitler did was immoral, indefensible, and objectively evil. Since he did it willingly, he is probably in hell.) But pride and self-righteousness shouldn’t come into it.


#6

Hmm… So you are saying that maybe baptism and ordination in and of themselves don’t make us saints? That people in parishes act like ordinary people, even sometimes act like politicians?:eek: Even priests do this?:eek::eek: No NO, tell me it ain’t so!:eek::eek::eek:


#7

Judge not lest ye be judged for the measure by which you judge others will be the measure you are judged by. (Matt 7, v1 and v2)

The meaning of these verses is pretty straight forward. It in no way implies you are going to hell, but that you will be judged by your own standard when you stand in judgment before the Lord or his appointee. (Matt 19, v28)

The best practice is to forgive and to show mercy and forgiveness and mercy will be shown unto you.


#8

My dear friend

Judging is condemning as guilty of sin. We should not do this if possible. We are judged by the standard we apply to others. We will not be judged by our Lord if we don’t judge our brethren. Hard to do though. I have trouble with abusive drivers behind me. But I try.

I require mercy not sacrifice meas the type of sacrifice I want is mercy - Jesus says. It’s very hard to always be merciful. We will get as much mercy from Jesus as we give to our brethren.

Do you see the link in the readings now? Hope I’ve helped.

May God bless you with an abundane of mercy and love:thumbsup::slight_smile:
John


#9

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