Time magazine current issue about the "Protestant Mary"

Has anyone read this? I have com across it on the internet but haven’t read it yet. I understand that the magazine talks about how Protestant Theology is undergoing a re-think of what role Mary should have.

time.com/time/covers/1101050321/

TO be frank I’ve never been very impressed with Time magazine articles on religion. The publishers discovered a while back that issues with religion on the cover would sell more than any other issue. Now about every 3 months they come out with a new angle. I’ve been disappointed several times in the past so I don’t buy them any more.

Hi Tom,
I too,saw the article and was amazed.The cover states Catholics have long revered her,but now Protestants are finding their own reasons to celebrate the mother of Jesus. I believe one of the first articles states they now believe she was the first disciple.Duh!! I highly doubt they will be able to find any thing NEW to celebrate about Mary as I feel the Catholic Church has pretty much covered all bases.If anything they will borrow the Catholic Church Tradition.

You know, Mary’s Immaculate Heart is always mentioned with how various people’s will be converted and how Chritianity will triumph. I mean, she converted Mexico and Central and South America, the seed is planted in the Muslims who already revere her, and now the Protestants are joining in. I think it’s a really good sign of good things to come.

[quote=Genesis315]You know, Mary’s Immaculate Heart is always mentioned with how various people’s will be converted and how Chritianity will triumph. I mean, she converted Mexico and Central and South America, the seed is planted in the Muslims who already revere her, and now the Protestants are joining in. I think it’s a really good sign of good things to come.
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Good points, and I agree, i think there is something of a Mary-revolution happening and has been happening for quite some time. I think that the coverage of Mary has substantially increased in the media with CNN recently doing a documentary on “the two Mary’s” for Mary Magdalane and the Blessed Virgin.

Now if only we can get our Catholics back on board praying their rosaries…

I like the article, I hope that the blessed ever virgin Maria will open the hearts of our seperated brothers to other divine truths and that one day they will come home.

Perhaps Mary will be the one who eventually brings us all to Jesus.

God grant that it is so.

Peace and Charity,

I just read the article today. I found one paragraph of quotes particularly telling.

“I always thought of her as the first disciple,” said Corrine Whitesell, 74. “Rosaries and Hail Marys, that’s not right. [But] that total submission to God is one of the most beautiful things about her.” Said Gloria Wolff, 78: “We grew up in a time when women couldn’t be elected as church elders. It’s important to teach young women about the strong female role models in the church.” Remarked John Burtch, 75: Maguire [referring to a Protestant minister who reveres Mary] is “the new guy on the block, and he’s go some interesting ideas. So we listen to him. We’re open to change.”

These comments, in a nutshell, describe the entire Protestant mentality. Ms. Whitesell doesn’t understand the Rosary and Hail Mary and doesn’t realize that the Blessed Virgin’s fiat (her total submission to God) is exactly one of the main reasons why we Catholics honor her as we do.

Then Ms. Wolff sees promise in using the most holy woman to ever walk the face of this Earth as a strong role model for women to become church leaders. Why not just a strong role model for women. Period. In case she hasn’t noticed Catholics don’t ordain women, if that’s where she’s headed. If she’s saying she sees Mary as someone all women can emmulate, then I think she gets it.

Then Mr. Burtch is as protestant as they come because he’s always ready for a new idea.

Nothing in the article went as deep as explaining the Catholic teachings of Our Lady correctly. The author seems to misunderstand the line “…pray for us sinners now, and at the hour of our death.” He seems to think Catholics believe the Virgin Mother is divine. Another example:
“Catholics definatly boosted Mary to even greater heights, eventually promulgating two different doctrines: in 1854, Mary’s Immaculate Conception, and as late as 1950, her bodily Assumption into heaven.”

This guy makes it sound like it was some new idea to honor the Blessed Mother, instead of defining doctrine that Catholic Tradition has always taught.

He also buys into the Protestant idea that everything must come from Scripture or it never happened.

The article wasn’t all bad for what it was - a secular magazine that likes to regularly exploit religion, among other topics, to sell magazines. Bottom line: I’m glad to see Protestants giving the Holy Mother the respect she deserves. For too long, I’ve had the feeling some Protestants I know almost go out of their way to not acknowledge her at all because to do so (they believe) would be tanamount to worshipping her as the Catholics do.

Every inch that the Protestants take nearer to the Truth, to Catholicism, is a blessing!

Look out for your ABC local TV station on March 27th: it is airing in a 1-hour special the conversion stories of some of the estimated 150,000 Americans who converted to Catholicism Easter of 2004.

I think that this is a huge deal. I’ve read several articles from protestants where they critique their own faith’s little emphasis on Mary and that they have neglected her too much for too long. It no where comes close to afirming Catholic Dogma, but agreed, that every inch closer to Mary will bring us all to Christ!!!

[quote=Catholic Tom]I think that this is a huge deal. I’ve read several articles from protestants where they critique their own faith’s little emphasis on Mary and that they have neglected her too much for too long. It no where comes close to afirming Catholic Dogma, but agreed, that every inch closer to Mary will bring us all to Christ!!!
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I think Mel Gibson’s “Passion” has also helped in this regard. Alot of evangelicals went to see that. And the film’s portrayal of Mary was very Catholic.

I’m a Protestant with some pro-Catholic beliefs. However, do not begrudge me when I say that I do not understand the full extent of Marian adoration. Firstly, most Protestants do not believe in the Immaculate Conception, Perpetual Virginity, or the Assumption. They simply believe that Mary was an ordinary human being (like you and I) that was chosen by God for a most special purpose. For the most part, however, they are silent on the issue. Like birth control, it’s a non-issue.

From my own personal studies, I believe that she does deserve a special place of honor. After all, she did say “yes” to God and she is the one who bore, fed, raised, and taught Jesus, my Savior. I’m still uncertain on praying to (or through) her and the saints for intercession though - I really struggle with this. This is the “biggie” for most Protestants.

I’'ve been talking to a local priest regarding Catholic doctrine and he says humorously that I’m more Catholic than much of his parish because I agree with many doctrines (including birth control), but struggle with a few others. I can not convert though until I come into a full understanding and agreement with the Catholic Church - otherwise, I feel that I would be living a lie (albeit in part). Until then, I’ll continue serving God to the greatest extent of my knowledge.

Claude

[quote=Rooter]TO be frank I’ve never been very impressed with Time magazine articles on religion. The publishers discovered a while back that issues with religion on the cover would sell more than any other issue. Now about every 3 months they come out with a new angle. I’ve been disappointed several times in the past so I don’t buy them any more.
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I agree 100%, Time never has a good religious article.

[quote=CSJ]I’m a Protestant with some pro-Catholic beliefs. However, do not begrudge me when I say that I do not understand the full extent of Marian adoration. Firstly, most Protestants do not believe in the Immaculate Conception, Perpetual Virginity, or the Assumption. They simply believe that Mary was an ordinary human being (like you and I) that was chosen by God for a most special purpose. For the most part, however, they are silent on the issue. Like birth control, it’s a non-issue.

From my own personal studies, I believe that she does deserve a special place of honor. After all, she did say “yes” to God and she is the one who bore, fed, raised, and taught Jesus, my Savior. I’m still uncertain on praying to (or through) her and the saints for intercession though - I really struggle with this. This is the “biggie” for most Protestants.

I’'ve been talking to a local priest regarding Catholic doctrine and he says humorously that I’m more Catholic than much of his parish because I agree with many doctrines (including birth control), but struggle with a few others. I can not convert though until I come into a full understanding and agreement with the Catholic Church - otherwise, I feel that I would be living a lie (albeit in part). Until then, I’ll continue serving God to the greatest extent of my knowledge.

Claude
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Martin Luther, John Calvin And Ulrich Zwiling all believed in her perpetual Virginity.Our lady and the Saints are part of the Body of Christ, there nothing wrong with asking them to pray for you.

I am glad that Protestants are starting to embrace the Blessed Mother of God. Sadly there are a lot of protestants out there that disrespect Mary a lot because they dont want to be “to Catholic”. I hope they learn to embrace her.

[quote=CSJ]I’m a Protestant with some pro-Catholic beliefs. However, do not begrudge me when I say that I do not understand the full extent of Marian adoration.
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Ok, first thing to clear up. Catholics do not and never have “adored” Mary. Mary is merely a saint (though a uniquely important one). She is not God, and only God is adored.

[quote=CSJ] From my own personal studies, I believe that she does deserve a special place of honor. After all, she did say “yes” to God and she is the one who bore, fed, raised, and taught Jesus, my Savior. I’m still uncertain on praying to (or through) her and the saints for intercession though - I really struggle with this. This is the “biggie” for most Protestants.
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Actually, it’s very simple. God answers all prayers. If you pray to him, God will provide you with what you objectively need. This objective need could be addressed in any number of ways, however and, as a special grace, God will sometimes fulfill our righteous wishes when we pray selflessly for others. He does this as a reward for praying together as a community.

Intercession is merely the joining of our prayers to those of others. We can ask any member of the Church, whether living or dead, to pray for us. In fact, we are enjoined in scripture to do so and to intercede for others. Even the Apostles asked others to pray for them.

The Church teaches that the living and the dead are united in Christ’s Church through him. Thus the righteous dead can hear our prayers (as angels can) and intercede for us by joining their prayers to ours. We can also intercede for them (though strictly speaking only those still in Purgatory have needs we can intercede for).

The saints, Mary most prominant amongst them, are God’s chosen to a special degree. They are uniquely sollicitous on our behalf and so are particularly disposed to intercede for us. When Catholics pray to Mary for her intercession they do not “pray” in the sense of worshiping her. They pray in the sense of communicating with her, as someone with a formal turn of speech might say “pray tell me”.

Catholics feel a particular connection to Mary as the mother of their Saviour, but also because they believe she is unique as a non divine human being in never having sinned or shared in the corruption of the Fall. Through her unquestioning submission to God she negated Eve’s rebellion and became for us the new Eve. Catholics particularly value her intercession in consequence.

Christ came to us at a specific and particular time in human history in which we were most disposed to be receptive to his coming. Mary’s sinlessness and willing submission was a fundamental and integral part of this receptivity. God did not create Mary for the Incarnation. The Incarnation was made possible by Mary’s consent. If she had not consented, Christ would not have forced himself on us because God respects the gift of free will he has given all of us. So in the same way we fell as a result of Eve’s rebellion, we have been redeemed through (though not “by”) Mary’s faith.

When you look at them carefully all the marian dogmas hang together. The angel Gabriel greets Mary as “Full of Grace” even before Mary’s submission. Hence she must have been free from sin or corruption from the very beginning of her existence (Immaculate Conception). Because death is the wages of sin and Mary remained sinless all her life, she was accepted bodily into Heaven without death (Assumption). In testimony to the antiquity of these beliefs, no church has ever claimed bodily relics of Mary. If any had, everyone would have immediately known the claim would have been fraudulent.

Basically, Protestantism fails to do justice to the truly extraordinary role of Mary by portraying her merely as a good woman who was willing to be pregnant for nine months and raise the child.

Irenicist

[quote=CSJ]I’m a Protestant with some pro-Catholic beliefs. However, do not begrudge me when I say that I do not understand the full extent of Marian adoration. Firstly, most Protestants do not believe in the Immaculate Conception, Perpetual Virginity, or the Assumption. They simply believe that Mary was an ordinary human being (like you and I) that was chosen by God for a most special purpose. For the most part, however, they are silent on the issue. Like birth control, it’s a non-issue.

From my own personal studies, I believe that she does deserve a special place of honor. After all, she did say “yes” to God and she is the one who bore, fed, raised, and taught Jesus, my Savior. I’m still uncertain on praying to (or through) her and the saints for intercession though - I really struggle with this. This is the “biggie” for most Protestants.

I’'ve been talking to a local priest regarding Catholic doctrine and he says humorously that I’m more Catholic than much of his parish because I agree with many doctrines (including birth control), but struggle with a few others. I can not convert though until I come into a full understanding and agreement with the Catholic Church - otherwise, I feel that I would be living a lie (albeit in part). Until then, I’ll continue serving God to the greatest extent of my knowledge.

Claude
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May God bless and guide you on your faith journey. You might start looking into the Old Testament, and as a source, I would suggest looking for articles and/or tapes and books by Scott Hahn, a former Presbyterian minister. He has some marvelous works on the biblical basis for Catholic doctrines.

[quote=CSJ]From my own personal studies, I believe that she does deserve a special place of honor. After all, she did say “yes” to God and she is the one who bore, fed, raised, and taught Jesus, my Savior. I’m still uncertain on praying to (or through) her and the saints for intercession though - I really struggle with this. This is the “biggie” for most Protestants.
/QUOTE]

Hello CSJ,

It is difficult for me to understand how, for Protestants, the Mary issue far outweighs the whole “praying to saints” issue (or purgatory for that matter).

If Catholics couldn’t pray to saints, we surely couldn’t pray to Mary.

Can you explain this for me?

Thank you.
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Growing up in the Methodist tradition, I learned early that John Wesley had a great love & devotion for the Virgin Mary. He believed that she was a perpetual virgin,too.
I can also clearly remember the:confused: shock I got when I grew up & found out that other people in Methodism didn’t believe in the assumption…It was a given at my house. (If I could remember the Bible verse my grandmother used to prove it, I’d tell it to you…)

The immaculate conception, I have problems with…I don’t understand it’s necessity. (I know, I’ve heard it all. I just have a block…).I certainly have no problem with the thought that she is the greatest of saints…

Now, as to calling her the “Mother of God”–Well, she was!! I mean that’s obvious. If you believe in the deity of Christ, it naturally follows…
(That noise you hear is :wink: other Methodists throwing things at me.)

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