‘To be white is to be racist, period,’ a high school teacher told his class


#1

"The lecture at the Norman, Okla., high school was intended to heal the racial divides, a student said.

The discussion’s premise: White people are racist. All of them.

Following that discussion, an Oklahoma teacher is under fire and a high school is mired in the debate about how teachers should inject themselves into controversial conversations about race in the United States."

washingtonpost.com/news/education/wp/2016/10/19/to-be-white-is-to-be-racist-period-a-high-school-teacher-told-his-class/?tid=pm_local_pop_b

‘“To be white is to be racist, period,” the teacher says.’

“The information was taken out of context and we believe it is important to have serious and thoughtful discussions about institutional racism in order to change history and promote inclusivity.”

What context would be appropriate for calling all white people racist?:confused:


#2

Only the extent that to be human is to be racist: that is, to have an automatically (and usually unconsciously) better impression of those who seem like you and your family or who seems in some non-essential way to be like the person you would like to be or have been taught to look up to.

We can be conditioned to like or dislike someone based on their resemblance to a fictional or mythic image we carry around in our heads. For instance, if the only image we have ever had of Our Lord is a long-haired bearded brunette of vaguely Western European descent, let’s face it, if we see a man who reminds us of that image, we’ll expect him to be a humble and gentle fellow and not a jerk. If there isn’t a black man who could possibly elicit a similar unconscious reaction in us, do we not unconsciously discriminate based on race?

If the teacher was only saying that a white person raised in the US is likely to have been conditioned to disproportionately carry around a positive reaction to whites and a negative reaction to non-whites, then that is something worth pointing out. To call everyone racist when we know that every race has people who were born not knowing what a stranger is, though, who naturally sees everyone as a good person until unequivocally proven otherwise, rightly disposes us to dispute such a blanket characterization.

Having said that, the term “racist” carries a connotation that is the equivalent of saying someone discriminates not just unjustly but willfully and even stubbornly. It is an insult to level that term at an entire group of people based on their race, and not just a little bit ironic, to say the least! Considering those people both white and nonwhite who are naturally friendly, open, positive and harbor no natural discrimination against anyone, the universal statement is plainly false, too. Not as many people are as open as that as they’d characterize themselves to be, but those people are unquestionably out there.


#3

Once you break it down past “human”, racism can enter the fray. Rather, we have culture problems in the US. Abortion culture. Drug culture. Gang culture. Thug culture. All races are involved, and clearly some more than others. We can argue until the Parousia about the reasons, but few seem to address moving beyond this.


#4

It is important to talk with children about institutionalized racism.

That said I can’t agree with the sentiment expressed here. I would say that everyone is prejudiced but not everyone is racist.


#5

This is reverse discrimination, saying all whites are racist.


#6

This reminds me of God’s Not Dead 2.


#7

I empathize with you, in your concern, but clearly you don’t understand the definition or concept of discrimination. While saying all whites are racist may be wrong on many levels, it is not by any stretch an example of discrimination.


#8

It’s increasingly common now, to hear in pc academia land, that non-white minorities can be prejudiced, but not racist, because racism is about having the power to discriminate. Pretty strange claim when you consider the fact that a high percentage of major US cities, have already had mayors from racial minorities. In addition, in various parts of the country there are countless minority dominated counties, constituencies, etc, which at the very least, hypothetically speaking would enable minorities to also practice discrimination.


#9

Indeed. If nothing else, it denies that members of other races can be just as racist.

And this was supposed to make race relations better!!!

ICXC NIKA


#10

When we say “white” are we referring to the trait of vaguely apricot-colored skin, or to having European ancestry? Many (if not most) Latino individuals have some European ancestry, and the same is true for the vast majority of African-Americans. Does one’s inherent racism shift depending upon the number of white ancestors you have? I’m Irish-German and nothing else, and I have cousins who are half Mexican: are they automatically less racist than me, even though they look a lot whiter than I do?

I’m thinking way too hard about this.


#11

“Latino” is not a race, so it really doesn’t say what race one is.

ICXC NIKA


#12

You could say the same for the term “Caucasian,” since it includes Indo-European, Semitic, and Hamitic peoples.


#13

umm, so if a white racist has a holiday in the Caribbean for a couple of weeks he stops being racist?

what is happening in our education system?


#14

Is education racist?

Is learning math or chemistry racist?

Or is learning math or chemistry too white?

Why did the light bulb and the steam engine originate in Europe instead of in China or Hindustan [India] or Africa?


#15

The light bulb in its well-known form came out of North America – else, you make a good point, and yes, some will say it is racist.

ICXC NIKA


#16

Actually if the teacher had made the point that mankind in general is racist by nature I would agree with that. Unfortunately a certain level of prejudice is hardwired into us as we are naturally tribalistic. As to the ‘white men invented most major inventions’ line of thinking (which I have heard advanced before) I would say it is very reductionist and ignores the fact that inventions and their inventors operate against a historical backdrop where knowledge is built on and that often incremental advances eventually lead to later breakthroughs.


#17

I was in Kindergarten when I first had my consciousness aroused to the fact that I shouldn’t treat black people differently. It never crossed my mind I would do otherwise until someone pointed it out. I didn’t look at my playmates the same way again. So much for that.


#18

People like this high school teacher should be careful. This trend of supporting minority identity politics while using diversity solely against whites will encourage 2 things.

  1. A race war.

  2. White identity politics. Given that white people played that game more successfully than anybody else, that ought to give the anti-white/pro-diversity crowd something to think long and hard about.


#19

Share more about that.


#20

When I was at school the English teacher had us examine a series of articles on prejudice and racism and look at the language used in them. One of the pupils asked the obvious but still useful question, "What is a ‘black’ person and what is a ‘white’ person? "The terms are nebulous and have fluid meaning and are to some degree social constructs.


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