To fight, or not to fight

So, I’m at work; the day’s almost over. The two girls next to me were talking about gay marriage. Turns out one of the girl’s is lesbian and is rather vocal about how she doesn’t have a problem with heterosexuals getting married and - well, you know.

I didn’t say a thing. I just stood there and listened. I was tired and didn’t feel like getting into what I was sure would turn into a heated argument.

So I guess my question is: Do I have to defend the faith every time? Are there times when it’s better not to? What would you have done?

You were overhearing the conversation. You were not a part of it. In short, you were eavesdropping and it would be impolite and rude to get involved in someone else’s conversation.

If they invited you in, that’s one thing, but if it was their own conversation (even if the girl was speaking loudly on purpose so that others could hear) you have no obligation to get involved, and it would be in error to do so in this particular situation.

You could have politely come into the convo by showing an interest in what they were saying and making a tactful comment - I think we are called to speak up and stand up for our faith and what’s right whenever we can, I would think Our Lord expects it - but we can do it nicely as well, firm but kind. We can try to be friendly to them at the same time as letting them know gently we don’t agree ad explaining why. After all, who else is going to tell them…we can sow a seed. But I agree, sometimes it is hard!! We can say in our hearts “dear Jesus, go before me” before we speak and he will help us.

I would be careful in the workplace. You never know how people can turn things against you, especially if your opinions don’t jive with “politically correct” opinion.

If others want to broadcast their feelings about this issue or that, so what? I couldn’t care less. I’m not paid to debate my colleagues, illuminate them with my views, or save their souls. Why pay attention?

Not every opposing view is necessarily a hostile one; if unwarranted or unwelcome, your “defense” can in fact be offensive.

I suppose you meant to say she doesn’t have a problem with homosexuals getting married, NOT heterosexuals; otherwise, that conversation must have been really weird!

Anyhow, I agree with Catholic80. It wasn’t YOUR conversation so I don’t think you’re under any moral obligation to get involved. If you had, it would probably have resulted in a heated argument rather than a polite conversation, especially since you were also tired.

You pray to Mary. If you then feel like you are being called to defend, pray to the Holy Spirit to give you the strength and words to defend the subject properly

MG,

So, I’m at work; the day’s almost over.

If you are on the clock and your work does not involve discussing homosexuality, marriage, or your Faith then you should work.

I didn’t say a thing. I just stood there and listened. I was tired and didn’t feel like getting into what I was sure would turn into a heated argument.

You were at work and you owe your employer a days work for a days wage. Your employer would have been satisfied that you did not say anything.

You overheard a conversation; you were not being challenged to defend the Faith. If your gay co-worker had talked to you about her feelings on gay marriage then you would have to step up and defend the Church’s positon on marriage. Interrupting their private convesation could have led to real trouble; we have to pick our battles, carefully.

Thank you all for your answeres! They are very helpful.

I do feel like I should explain a little bit though… I work in a factory. I stand on one side of the conveyor belt. The one girl was on the other side directly in front of me and the girl she was talking to was next to her. They were speaking loudly, but this could be because of all the machinery noise, you have to speak loudly to be heard. Everybody always chats while they work; if we don’t, we risk going crazy. Normally, everyone joins in everyone else’s conversation. If you want privacy, you save it till after work. So, all this being said, I don’t really feel like I was eavesdropping, or that I would have been interrupting a private conversation. (Actually, one of the girls later commented that I had been awfully quiet during their conversation. I just smiled and shrugged.)

We were all working diligently the entire time, so I’m not really worried about what my employer thinks or what I’m getting paid to do.

I suppose you meant to say she doesn’t have a problem with homosexuals getting married, NOT heterosexuals; otherwise, that conversation must have been really weird!

Sorry, I should have been more clear on that. She was saying that she believes heterosexuals have the right to get married and she doesn’t see why we can’t have the same consideration for homosexuals. Sorry about that.

All of this being said, do you still feel the same way? :shrug:

Yes, because it’s still not the right venue for a conversation about such a controversial topic. Since the machinery noise requires people to speak loudly, you would no doubt have had to raise your voice to express your beliefs. This might have been misinterpreted by the woman, or someone else such as your supervisor, who may have opposing views, that you are being hostile. While people sometimes interject their 2 cents into others’ conversations, given the nature of this topic, I think it was wise of you not to get involved at that moment. Perhaps if the subject comes up again while you are directly talking to her, you can better express your own views; but, all in all, it’s probably best to talk about such things either after work or during break times.

On topics of Faith: He hasn’t let me down when I have asked for His intercession; the Holy Spirit has given me words and sentences that aren’t even formed in my mind, let alone making me sound like a philosopher or apologist or theologian.

Christina

Thank you again. I feel much better about it now. :slight_smile:

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.