Today's homily at my parish-- "I don't recognize you.''


#1

*Just wanted to share a poignant seed that our parish priest planted today, through his homily. His homilies first of all, are awesome. We always walk away from mass feeling like we learned something about our faith.

In stride with the Gospel, he touched upon end times, and how no one can predict when the earth will end. Some can speculate, but only the Father knows. That said, he went on to say that will God ‘‘recognize’’ you when you come before Him? Imagine Jesus telling you someday… ‘‘I don’t recognize you.’’ He said that we have to live our faith, and be visibly Christ to others. We want Christ to say… ‘‘Well done, good and faithful servant.’’ Not, ‘‘Who are you? I don’t recogize you.’’

I thought it was a very moving message, yet simple.

Just wanted to share…

Any moving homilies that stuck with you, recently?*


#2

My priest did a fairly similar homily today… Told us hes going to see 2012 (which I wish he would have elaborated more on us NOT believing this is what is going to happen… b/c now you know some people are going to decide thats what its like), then he talked about end times a bit- then he talked about stewardship- and he also said the line- well done, good and faithful servant.

Where do you live by the way?


#3

*That sounds like a very similiar homily given by our parish priest.

I live in Florida. *


#4

Our deacon gave a homily in which he noted that there are two ways to be vigilant: like a soldier in a foxhole anticipating mortar fire or like a little kid anticipating Christmas. The little kid prepares and does his best to be good and so waits in joy, while the soldier prepares and does his best and waits in fear. If we are “like little children”, as we have been told to be, we do our best to prepare, let God free us of all anxiety, and then wait in joyful anticipation.


#5

that sounds a lot like what my priest said too, Whatevergirl :slight_smile:


#6

Our priest explained how this passage in the literal sense was about the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem and that Jesus was using apocolyptic language. But that it also points us towards the end of the world in a spiritual sense. He said that God has already won the battle and that the power of his love and mercy is made present to us especially in the Eucharist. He explained that we will stand before God in judgement when we die, and if we get into heaven, it won’t be an accident. It will be because in freedom, we chose to bring honor and glory to God in all that we think, say ,and do here. Of course he said it much better than I just did.

Last week his homily was JUST what I needed to hear. I have been struggling with the idea of giving everything to God to the point that I’d mentioned it in confession. 95% or so, I’m OK with, but everything??? So last week was the Gospel about the widow giving her last 2 coins. Father pointed out how she was humble - dependent on God - which is the opposite of arrogance and pride. How she knew God was worth everything she had. He spoke about how God thought WE were worth everything that HE had - to the point that he suffered and died for us.

Then he gave us a challenge - at the Consecration, when we pray, “This is my Body, which was given up for you…” LOOK at Him and say to Him, “Lord, take MY body…Lord, take my blood.”

Pretty hard to hang on to 5% when you look at it that way.


#7

WG, you’ve touched on my deepest fear. It scares the living **** out of me to think that God might say that to me. Whenever that reading comes up I start to worry.

Betsy


#8

*That is a great way to view it. *


#9

*It can bring upon fear at times…but Jesus told us not to be afraid. There is this tendency to think that we will have an entire lifetime before us, but we don’t. I learned that the hard way, losing my parents at a young age. So, we don’t know when the last day will be. Could be tomorrow, could be 50 years from now. We can only wake up each day, take up our cross, and try our best to follow Christ. All things are made new in Christ…so, when we stumble, we can rest assure that God is there to lift us back up, if we but let Him. Jesus died for our sins, so we would have the hope of salvation. We can’t earn it, but we can show Him our love, by following Him, as best we can. So…what shall we fear? :o *


#10

I’m grateful you posted here, thank you. This is so uplifting!!!


#11

The thing I sometimes wonder is when we confess our sins, and give a good act of contrition, but maybe backslide later on down the road…and then we confess the sin again, and we keep asking God for something we might be struggling with…for His help–I wonder how God views this? (for example, I sometimes become obsessive with worry, I confess, I truly want to change, I change for a time, then something triggers the backslide…and my worry starts) I know we are to keep getting back up when we fall, and I know that God is all encompassing love and mercy…unfathomable love and mercy, but I guess in my human limitations, I feel like I’m letting Him down, when I confess something, and then, at some point down the road, I slip up with the same sin or habit. :frowning:


#12

I think that the God who made us and knows us is familiar with our human limitations. I think we DO disappoint Him when we repeat the same things over and over, but His strength is made perfect in our weakness. Is that how it works? I, too, have some “recurring themes” in confession. It’s not every time that I have to confess certain things, but there surely is a pattern. As if the grace “works” for a while, and then loses it’s effectiveness. Just when I think I’ve got a handle on things, I find out differently…maybe it’s a way of keeping us humble, dependent on Him, poor in spirit… Maybe?

:twocents:


#13

He corrects and instructs in his homilies, he doesn’t soft-pedal the truth, but he does it without being accusatory or fear-mongering. And he’s a transitional deacon, so there’s a good confessor coming down the pike, too, Heaven willing!


#14

This is a great way of looking at all of this, also. I am reading right now The Problem of Pain, by CS Lewis. It is truly not morbid, but rather focuses on why God permits suffering, and what He wants us to learn from it. The most fascinating thing that I have read, and probably will last with me forever, is Lewis explains that God wants our best. THAT is the meaning of true love, when someone wants the best for you. God’s best, sometimes causes us pain. Maybe because we are of a fallen nature, but following Christ is not always easy. Some days, it feels effortless…others, ugh. It can be tough! Not because we don’t want to follow Him, or because we don’t want to be more like Him, but sometimes, we want to take the easier road. Taking the harder roads, trying to stretch and grow away from sin…makes us holier…and that is the main thing God is interested in. And ultimately, we will be at our happiest when we are holy. Please get this book if you haven’t read it…it’s remarkable.


#15

I think that this is a very interesting homily - and although well intentioned - I think it may be better said would we recognize God?

I have been taught that God loves us very personally - Psalm 139 for example. When Christ died - he died thinking of each one of us. So it doesn't make much sense to think that God wouldn't recognize us.

Just my thoughts.


#16

[quote="PatsWife922, post:15, topic:176523"]
I think that this is a very interesting homily - and although well intentioned - I think it may be better said would we recognize God?

I have been taught that God loves us very personally - Psalm 139 for example. When Christ died - he died thinking of each one of us. So it doesn't make much sense to think that God wouldn't recognize us.

Just my thoughts.

[/quote]

I think the priest was implying through his homily not that Christ wouldn't recognize us at all, but rather if we choose to not follow Him--He wouldn't recognize us (as His followers) That's I think how he meant it.


#17

[quote="PatsWife922, post:15, topic:176523"]
I think that this is a very interesting homily - and although well intentioned - I think it may be better said would we recognize God?

I have been taught that God loves us very personally - Psalm 139 for example. When Christ died - he died thinking of each one of us. So it doesn't make much sense to think that God wouldn't recognize us.

[/quote]

This very scary idea appears in two passages of the New Testament. The first is from the parable of the wise and foolish virgins in Matthew 25:

10“But while they were on their way to buy the oil, the bridegroom arrived. The virgins who were ready went in with him to the wedding banquet. And the door was shut.

11“Later the others also came. ‘Sir! Sir!’ they said. ‘Open the door for us!’

12“But he replied, ‘I tell you the truth, I don’t know you.’

13“Therefore keep watch, because you do not know the day or the hour.

The second is from Luke, Chapter 13, 22-30, about the narrow gate:

26“Then you will say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.’

27“But he will reply, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from. Away from me, all you evildoers!’

Betsy


#18

[quote="whatevergirl, post:1, topic:176523"]
*Just wanted to share a poignant seed that our parish priest planted today, through his homily. His homilies first of all, are awesome. We always walk away from mass feeling like we learned something about our faith.

In stride with the Gospel, he touched upon end times, and how no one can predict when the earth will end. Some can speculate, but only the Father knows. That said, he went on to say that will God ''recognize'' you when you come before Him? Imagine Jesus telling you someday... ''I don't recognize you.'' He said that we have to live our faith, and be visibly Christ to others. We want Christ to say.... ''Well done, good and faithful servant.'' Not, ''Who are you? I don't recogize you.''

I thought it was a very moving message, yet simple.

Just wanted to share...

Any moving homilies that stuck with you, recently?*

[/quote]

Thank you for sharing. That one sentence "I do not know you" has always haunted me and brings sadness into my heart. I heard it in a sermon too, about 25 years ago.

Did you know that the event prior to the "end of the world" is Christ's return with the saints to rule for a thousand years? That is to occur before the world and the universe ends.


#19

No, I didn’t know that, thank you for sharing. Wow…that is interesting.


#20

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