Todays Readings - Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary TIme


#1

Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 103
Based on the Knox Version of the Holy Bible

Reading 1

IS 55:10-11
Thus says the LORD:
Once fallen from the sky, does rain or snow return to it?
Nay, it refreshes earth, soaking into it and making it fruitful,
to provide the sower with fresh seed,
the hungry mouths with bread.
So it is with the word by these lips of mine once uttered;
it will not come back, an empty echo, the way it went;
all my will it carries out, speeds on its errand.*

Responsorial Psalm*

PS 65:10, 11, 12-13, 14

R/ (Lk 8:8)*The seed that falls on good ground will yield a fruitful harvest.
You have brought relief to this land of ours, have watered and greatly enriched it; deep flows the channel where your divine providence grants us food; long time do you prepare it,

R/*The seed that falls on good ground will yield a fruitful harvest.
watering the furrow, loosening the clods,
multiplying, with soft showers, the grain.
blessing its yield.
R/*The seed that falls on good ground will yield a fruitful harvest.
Your bounty it is that crowns the year; where your feet have passed, the stream of plenty flows; flows through the desert pastures, till all the hill-sides are gaily clad,

R/*The seed that falls on good ground will yield a fruitful harvest.
herds throng the fields, and the valleys stand deep in corn; the shout of joy everywhere, everywhere the hymn of praise.

R/*The seed that falls on good ground will yield a fruitful harvest.

Reading 2
ROM 8:18-23
Brothers and sisters:
Not that I count these present sufferings as the measure of that glory which is to be revealed in us. If creation is full of expectancy, that is because it is waiting for the sons of God to be made known. Created nature has been condemned to frustration; not for some deliberate fault of its own, but for the sake of him who so condemned it, with a hope to look forward to; namely, that nature in its turn will be set free from the tyranny of corruption, to share in the glorious freedom of God’s sons. The whole of nature, as we know, groans in a common travail all the while. And not only do we see that, but we ourselves do the same; we ourselves, although we have already begun to reap our spiritual harvest, groan in our hearts, waiting for that adoption which is the ransoming of our bodies from their slavery.*

Gospel*
MT 13:1-23

That day, leaving the house, Jesus had sat down by the sea-shore,*and great multitudes gathered about him, so that he went on board a ship and sat there instead, while the whole multitude remained standing on the beach. And he spoke to them long, in parables;

“Here”, he began, “is the sower gone out to sow.* And as he sowed, there were grains that fell beside the path, so that all the birds came and ate them up.* And others fell on rocky land, where the soil was shallow; they sprang up all at once, because they had not sunk deep in the ground;* but as soon as the sun rose they were parched; they had taken no root, and so they withered away. Some fell among briers, so that the briers grew up, and smothered them.* But others fell where the soil was good, and these yielded a harvest, some a hundredfold, some sixtyfold, some thirtyfold. *Listen, you that have ears to hear with”.

And his disciples came to him, and said, “Why do you speak to them in parables?”*

“Because”, he answered, “it is granted to you to understand the secrets of God’s kingdom, but not to these others. If a man is rich, gifts will be made to him, and his riches will abound; if he is poor, even the little he has will be taken from him.* And if I talk to them in parables, it is because, though they have eyes, they cannot see, and though they have ears, they cannot hear or understand.* Indeed, in them the prophecy of Isaias is fulfilled, You will listen and listen, but for you there is no understanding; you will watch and watch, but for you there is no perceiving. The heart of this people has become dull, their ears are slow to listen, and they keep their eyes shut, so that they may never see with those eyes, or hear with those ears, or understand with that heart, and turn back to me, and win healing from me.

But blessed are your eyes, for they have sight; blessed are your ears, for they have hearing.* And, believe me, there have been many prophets and just men who have longed to see what you see, and never saw it, to hear what you hear, and never heard it.
The parable of the sower, then, is for your hearing.*

Wherever a man hears the word by which the kingdom is preached, but does not grasp it, the evil one comes and carries off what was sown in his heart; his was the wayside sowing. The man who took in the seed in rocky ground is the man who hears the word and at once entertains it gladly;* but there is no root in him, and he does not last long; no sooner does tribulation or persecution arise over the word, than his faith is shaken.* And the man who took in the seed in the midst of briers is the man who hears the word, but allows the cares of this world and the false charms of riches to stifle it, so that it remains fruitless. Whereas the man who took in the seed in good soil is the man who both hears and grasps it; such men are fruitful, one grain yielding a hundredfold, one sixtyfold, one thirtyfold.”


#2

Knox? Does anyone use the Knox in the Liturgy? I’ve never really been exposed to the Knox and it seems very different. The difference from the NAB and RSV is enough to be disconcerting to me.

his was the wayside sowing

Yuk.

It feels like it cant decide what it wants to be. At times it wants to be the KJV or DR, and at other times it wants to be the NIV. :confused:

-Tim-


#3

Knox Translation Copyright © 2013 Westminster Diocese
Nihil Obstat. Father Anton Cowan, Censor.
Imprimatur. +Most Rev. Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster. 8th January 2012.
Re-typeset and published in 2012 by Baronius Press Ltd

newadvent.org/bible/gen001.htm shown here with the Greek and Latin


#4

I love this part: “But blessed are your eyes, for they have sight; blessed are your ears, for they have hearing.* And, believe me, there have been many prophets and just men who have longed to see what you see, and never saw it, to hear what you hear, and never heard it. The parable of the sower, then, is for your hearing.”

Even though the translation is rougher than the NAB, it gets the point across. To me it reminds me what a great Treasure is my Faith and never fails to remind me to be very, very, very grateful for it. Not everyone who reads a Bible understands what it means and not everyone who gazes upon the Lamb of God when the Priest holds Him up sees Jesus either, though some could give you a perfect definition of the Eucharist and could narrate the Mass for you from start to finish. They still don’t listen with their hearts. Love is all He asks of us. Just love Him as He is. Hear with the ears of your hearts. I love today’s readings. Have since I came into the Church.

Glenda


#5

Thanks for the link.

***but already, over its waters, stirred the breath of God. ***

I like that from Genesis 1:2. That’s exactly the meaning of the “mighty wind” or spirit hovering over the face of the deep. It is the breath of God.

But I’m still wondering if anyone uses it in the liturgy.

-Tim-


#6

Having ears but not hearing or eyes but not seeing is a simile for rebellion, foolishness and senselessness. See Jerimiah 5:21, Ezekiel 12:2.

-Tim-


#7

Thank you so much for posting Msgr. Knox’s rich and elegant translations of today’s Mass readings. :slight_smile: For me, they brought new understanding and fresh insights, especially of the Gospel.

Here is a short biography of his life:

baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=60#tab=tab-4

and another of his translation of the Holy Bible:

“In his *On Englishing the Bible, *Msgr. Knox explains how he carried out the mandate given to him by the English hierarchy. He aimed at a Bible that was understandable to modern audiences and yet rooted in Catholic tradition and written in timeless English’. He wanted a Bible that did not merely translate the original but made it read as if an Englishman had written it.”

baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=60#tab=tab-3


#8

The Knox Bible was, however, one of the approved vernacular versions of the Bible used in the Lectionary readings for Mass from 1965 to the early 1970s along with the Confraternity Bible.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knox%27s_Translation_of_the_Vulgate

Notice that it’s a dynamic translation and it appears to oppose the 2001 Liturgiam Authenticam in this matter.


#9

Shakespeare maybe?

Nahhh…


#10

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.