Tony Blair: We'll Deport the Hatemongers

It’s about time:

LONDON – Foreigners who preach hatred, sponsor violence or belong to extremist groups could be deported from Britain under strict new measures that Prime Minister Tony Blair announced Friday, nearly a month after suicide bombers killed 52 people on London’s transit system.

Membership in extremist Islamic groups such as Hizb-ut-Tahrir would become a crime under the new measures. The group, which advocates the creation of an Islamic state in Central Asia, already is outlawed in several countries.
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Blair said the government also would compile a list of Web sites, bookshops and centers that incite hatred and violence. British nationals involved with such organizations could face strict penalties. Foreign nationals could be deported, he said.
“They come here and they play by our rules and our way of life,” Blair said at his monthly news conference. “If they don’t, they are going to have to go.”

The government would hold a one-month consultation on new grounds for excluding and deporting people from the United Kingdom, he said.

Britain’s ability to deport foreign nationals has been hampered by human rights legislation. As a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights, Britain is not allowed to deport people to a country where they may face torture or death.

The British government has been seeking assurances from several countries _ including Algeria, Tunisia and Egypt _ for suspects to be protected against inhumane treatment if deported. The government has already reached an agreement with Jordan.

Britain was seeking assurances from about 10 countries, and Blair said he had constructive talks with leaders of Algeria and Lebanon on Thursday. The government was prepared to amend human rights legislation if legal challenges arose from the new deportation measures, he said.

Blair said anyone linked with terrorism could be refused asylum, and the new measures make it easier for the government to strip extremists of dual citizenship.

The government also was considering a request from police and security services to hold terror suspects for three months without charge. The current time limit is 14 days.

A spokesman for Hizb ut Tahrir Britain, Imran Waheed, said Blair’s comments were “most unjust,” and the group would fight any ban through the courts.

“Hizb ut Tahrir is a nonviolent political party,” he said. “Our members are all for political expression, not for violence.”

Blair said the government will consult with Muslim leaders on how to close mosques “used as a center for fomenting extremism” and would draw up a list of foreign Islamic clerics “not suitable to preach who will be excluded from Britain.”

“We will establish, with the Muslim community, a commission to advise on how, consistent with people’s complete freedom to worship in the way they want, and to follow their own religion and culture, there is better integration of those parts of the community presently inadequately integrated,” Blair said.

The prime minister dismissed a message from the al-Qaida terror network broadcast Thursday that linked the London bombings to Britain’s involvement in the Iraq war.

Terror attacks by four suspected suicide bombers on July 7 killed 56 people, including the four bombers. There were no casualties in bombings two weeks later on July 21 _ attacks that also targeted three subways and a double-decker bus.

Police have not established firm links between the London bombings and al-Qaida, or between the two sets of bombings.

Police believe they have in custody the four attackers from July 21. One reportedly said the attacks were fueled by Britain’s involvement in Iraq.

In a message broadcast Thursday on the pan-Arab satellite channel Al-Jazeera, al-Qaida No. 2 Ayman al-Zawahri warned Britons and blamed Blair.

“Blair has brought to you destruction in central London, and he will bring more of that, God willing,” al-Zawahri said.

He did not claim responsibility for the attacks.

Blair said it was impossible to negotiate with al-Qaida leaders.

“You only have to read the demands coming from al-Qaida to realize there is no compromise possible with these people,” Blair said.

newsmax.com/archives/articles/2005/8/5/85224.shtml

People who are on visas visiting countries who preach any kind of hate of anyone, should probably be asked to leave. This is a public safety issue.

[quote=gilliam]People who are on visas visiting countries who preach any kind of hate of anyone, should probably be asked to leave. This is a public safety issue.
[/quote]

Agreed. Freedom comes with some respnsibilities.

Goodness me!! HOW could he be so MEAN??? He should try to understand them, and give these nice people ice cream and cupcakes and sit and wait for the next attack!!! After all they are NICE people who wouldn’t do what they are doing if it weren’t for the mean ole’ Jews and evil Americans!!!

Lily,

You are assuming those who hate are only Muslem. I assure you that a lot of Christians hate and spew hate as well. I am sure they will also be asked to leave.

Gilliam I am being sarcastic. I have noticed a double standard. Understand the Muslim terrorist,(but that Jew, yesterday, was an evil barbarian, no one trying to understand him) don’t be mean to the prisoners in Cuba. Really we need to take off the kid gloves and fight the war to win.Forget winning the hearts and minds it’s bull ****.

**Yes, mainstream Christians are hatemongerers and should be sent to Saudi Arabia.**Especially the one who wrote the editorial for “Alive Now” May/June 2005 issue.

Lily,

Please watch your language. This is a Catholic forum.

Back to the topic:

If someone is on a visa they are guests of that country. Guests have certain responsibilities they agree to to get that visa. To preach hate of any sort especially to stur up violence is not only a public safety issue but a discourteous act against your host. In either case they should be asked to leave. It really doesn’t matter what faith they have.

They’d better be precise or will preaching that homosexual behaviour is wrong also fall under this law?

They’d better be precise or will preaching that homosexual behaviour is wrong also fall under this law?

If they deport the mainstream Christians that would not even be an issue.Gilliam, I am sorry the word “****” offended you, I will refrain from using it.

[quote=gilliam]Lily,

You are assuming those who hate are only Muslem. I assure you that a lot of Christians hate and spew hate as well. I am sure they will also be asked to leave.
[/quote]

And do you have a single example of this from Britian?

[quote=gilliam]Lily,

Please watch your language. This is a Catholic forum.

Back to the topic:

If someone is on a visa they are guests of that country. Guests have certain responsibilities they agree to to get that visa. To preach hate of any sort especially to stur up violence is not only a public safety issue but a discourteous act against your host. In either case they should be asked to leave. It really doesn’t matter what faith they have.
[/quote]

Stir up violence being the key. Muslims are known to do this frequently. Where are all the Christians stirring up the violence?

[quote=MichaelTDoyle]They’d better be precise or will preaching that homosexual behaviour is wrong also fall under this law?
[/quote]

It’s time to make such distinctions. Preaching against sin is NOT stirring up violence. Calling those of a particular belief to take up arms against the great satans IS stirring up violence.

There seems to be a fine line between freedom of speech and sedition. In the U.S. when does free speech become seditious?

Under the U.S. sedition laws should Michael Moore be deported?

Should the owners of Communist bookstores preaching the overthrow of the federal government be deported?

While I openly hate homosexuality and democrats and liberalism I do not advocate violence towards homosexuals or democrats or liberals, so should I be deported as a hatemonger?

I am curious as to the requisites of who is to decide what defines a hatemonger?

Under the U.S. sedition laws should Michael Moore be deported?

Good idea, maybe he can go to China and make his movies. Or TRY to.

Should the owners of Communist bookstores preaching the overthrow of the federal government be deported?
rWhy don’t they go to a communist country and open up their book store?

While I openly hate homosexuality I do not advocate violence towards them, so should I be deported as a hatemonge .

Who in the world said to physically harm homosexuals? The only people who should be harmed are suspected terrorists or terrorists.

[quote=Bobby A. Greene]There seems to be a fine line between freedom of speech and sedition. In the U.S. when does free speech become seditious?

[/quote]

I don’t know if seditious is the proper term here. What we are talking about is speech that teaches and promotes the mass killing of innocents in the country by foreigners.

Nope.

If they are foreigners and/or preach violence towards the innocent as a way to accomplish this, then yes.

No.

The people, through their representatives making law.

The people, through their representatives making law.

But this seldom happens anymore.

[quote=Brad]Stir up violence being the key. Muslims are known to do this frequently. Where are all the Christians stirring up the violence?
[/quote]

The Christians who are advocating violence against Muslims come to mind.

[quote=gilliam]The Christians who are advocating violence against Muslims come to mind.
[/quote]

I haven’t seen them. Who are they? Also, under this criteria, they would have to be foreign Christians.

[quote=Bobby A. Greene]But this seldom happens anymore.
[/quote]

Then we have a bigger crisis than terrorism. It has to happen this way or else we have no freedom.

The Christians who are advocating violence against Muslims come to mind.

Which Christians are doing that? Unless you are talking about Bosnia.

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