Too many parents still ignore dangers of baby blankets


#1

Warning to parents: Don’t use baby blankets in infants’ cribs cbsn.ws/1za3Bvh


#2

Read a little further down. There’s also a warning against bed-sharing/co-sleeping.


#3

I use a crocheted blanket when mine are little. Breathable, soft, comfy and safe. I can’t get mine to ever stay under/in a blanket even though the nursery is the coldest room in the house though… so I’m also really good about double layering pajamas. :smiley:


#4

But dry cleaning bags are still safe, right?


#5

What’s your point?


#6

and they say not to swaddle now too unless under the direct supervision of a pediatric doctor…

honestly, was glad the day my kids turned over from back to stomach and we didn’t have to worry about all of this stuff.

did you also read the article that stated all of the food guidelines for the past 15 years for introducing food to children is a bunch of … well… poo? Even with known allergens… to simply introduce those in very small amounts and watch closely for several hours.


#7

I am reminded of Rosanna Dana from SNL, “It’s always something.” Headlines sell. I note that one could just as easily used the headline, “SIDS Deaths in Decline.”


#8

The article also says don’t let them sleep alone in a crib or a bassinet.

It is truly amazing the human race has survived up to this point.


#9

This is the first I have ever heard of dangers involving baby blankets.
I have a new grandchild coming in March.

So many things to worry about! :eek:


#10

My kids all slept in bed with us (can you say crowded?), and boy howdy! they all seemed to grow up.

And, we introduced food when WE thought it right and proper, not when some magazine told us to do so.


#11

Rubbish absolute rubbish. There is a sensible approach to everything. A breathable cotton or wool is perfectly fine. Also the scientific community has done a complete about face on cosleeping as long as guidelines are followed (don’t do it on couch, no drugs/alcohol). Please I wish these fear mongers would shut up! Mothers have it hard enough! The cynical side of me see this all as misogyny in disguise. When you look at all these studies they never have adequate controls or come from reputable journals or large data sets, they are merely picked up by the media because they love fear mongering.


#12

Btw I left it too late to edit my post, but Gilliam, my frustration wasn’t directed at you, I think it’s a fine thing to warn other parents of danger. My frustration is at this whole SIDS industry which only has identified one major risk factor (sleeping on front or side, and good on them for that!) but has failed to identify any others and stand to lose a lot of money if people realise their purpose has been served so keep feeding us this idiocy.


#13

My point is that babies will die no matter what we do or don’t do. :hmmm:

IMO, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the NIH should take a stand against the biggest killer of babies in the U.S.–legal abortion.

Don’t be so sensitive, Heidi_storage. As far as I’m concerned, if parents choose to sleep with their babies, that’s their business. As long as they don’t try to convince all the rest of us that it’s The Only Way to raise children, I’m fine with their choice. It’s only when the co-sleepers try to cite “scientific evidence” that babies are meant to co-sleep and that all of us who don’t co-sleep are shirking our duty and subjecting our babies to loneliness and terror in their cold, stark cribs–that’s when I get a tad irritated. There are plenty of options that work well for babies, and parents need to do what works best for them and their babies.


#14

When I read things like this I realize what a terrible parent I was. Our babies always slept in a crib wrapped in a baby blanket. My children didn’t wear helmets when they rode their bikes, we even had a swing set in the backyard. I an quite surprised my 4 daughters lived to be adults!


#15

Same here.

We were lucky?

This is about statistics. Stats don’t lie.

The advice given in the OP article is good…very good.


#16

Yes and after I tightened my roller skates with their key, I failed to put on any helmet or knee guards or elbow guards and my favorite things on the playground were the jungle gym and the seesaw!


#17

Again…same here!

Weren’t we so lucky?!

The advice in the OP article is good…very good.

I can’t make light of an article that offers life saving measures…especially for children.


#18

(This thread sparked the thought)…

With smaller sized families – young parents probably have fewer models and less info to gain from parents and siblings.

I can only imagine young parents turning to google to help and determine if their crying child is hungry, or maybe a colicky child, an ear infection, ebola or heck maybe brain trauma (where they were rocking too hard to put them asleep)?

In some cases a lot more parental stress.


#19

I think the general rule of thumb is to be sensible. There are statistics that children should never fall asleep in their car seat either. But I guarantee you more infants have died sleeping in their crib than have died sleeping in their car seat. Does that make a crib unsafe? No, of course not. There is something to be said for not smothering the child–obviously don’t bury their sweet little faces in a fleece blanket but come on. Parents can use common sense. That article spoke against co-sleeping, and also against sleeping in the crib. Where should a child sleep, for crying out loud?! Sheesh! :stuck_out_tongue:

When my oldest was a baby, she only slept on her tummy. Of course, every book and every doctor insisted that she needed to sleep on her back to decrease the risk of sids. But I’ll tell you what–the MOMENT she learned how to roll herself over, my chances of getting her on her back went from slim to none. And my own sleepless nights went away, too. Because she was actually comfortable and willing to sleep.


#20

My oldest baby is 22, my youngest is 3. The guidelines for the ten kids that span those years are enough to boggle the mind :whacky: My last baby was sent home with one of those swaddle-sleeper things. It had a warning to not use once the baby could roll over. He rolled over while still in the hospital!


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