Top Hospitals Opt Out of Obamacare


#1

US News and World Report

The Obama Administration has been claiming that insurance companies will be competing for your dollars under the Affordable Care Act, but apparently they haven't surveyed the nation's top hospitals.

Americans who sign up for Obamacare will be getting a big surprise if they expect to access premium health care that may have been previously covered under their personal policies. Most of the top hospitals will accept insurance from just one or two companies operating under Obamacare.

"This doesn't surprise me," said Gail Wilensky, Medicare advisor for the second Bush Administration and senior fellow for Project HOPE. "There has been an incredible amount of focus on the premium cost and subsidy, and precious little focus on what you get for your money."

Yeah, that's going to be another issue altogether. Which providers (not just hospitals) are going to accept the insurance?


#2

D'oh! Extra Strength Tylenol sales are brisk in the Washington, DC area these days.

Well, Congressperson Pelosi, we now know what is in the bill. Just ask pain pill-poppin' Kathleen Sebelius.


#3

Not to worry. It will have absolutely no affect on the maternity coverage for single men. :D


#4

[quote="Dawnia, post:3, topic:343801"]
Not to worry. It will have absolutely no affect on the maternity coverage for single men. :D

[/quote]

Well with contraception and abortifacients as "preventative care" I don't think women will have to worry about maternity coverage either. Just perfect the cure for pregnancy and all women will be healthy and hale.:shrug:


#5

[quote="Usige, post:4, topic:343801"]
Well with contraception and abortifacients as "preventative care" I don't think women will have to worry about maternity coverage either. Just perfect the cure for pregnancy and all women will be healthy and hale.:shrug:

[/quote]

If no one reproduces then no one will have to pay for health coverage or taxes, even.

That will teach those @$##€%£¥ liberal politicians!!!

Wait a minute...

Isn't that what is...:eek:


#6

[quote="markomalley, post:1, topic:343801"]
US News and World Report

The Obama Administration has been claiming that insurance companies will be competing for your dollars under the Affordable Care Act, but apparently they haven't surveyed the nation's top hospitals.

Americans who sign up for Obamacare will be getting a big surprise if they expect to access premium health care that may have been previously covered under their personal policies. Most of the top hospitals will accept insurance from just one or two companies operating under Obamacare.

"This doesn't surprise me," said Gail Wilensky, Medicare advisor for the second Bush Administration and senior fellow for Project HOPE. "There has been an incredible amount of focus on the premium cost and subsidy, and precious little focus on what you get for your money."

Yeah, that's going to be another issue altogether. Which providers (not just hospitals) are going to accept the insurance?

[/quote]

Case Medical center, and other affiliated facilities are very well respected. It would be a shame if they end up denying coverage from any viable insurance company. This would mean that people will loss out on excellent care. But it's pretty early in the game for any such predictions. Care providers, and insurance companies negotiate deals all of the time. So, as long as both parties are fair and open to reach a deal. They will.:)

ATB


#7

I work in a hospital lab.

I think that the main concern of hospitals is getting reimbursed for their services.

Our hospital is owed millions by our state (Illinois!).

They will work with companies that actually give them that money that is owed. They will be hesitant to work with companies that don't reimburse for services rendered.

I hope that the Affordable Health Care Act will be able to reimburse hospitals. When there is no reimbursement, the hospitals are forced to raise their prices, and this means that the companies that DO reimburse have to raise their premiums, which means that those of us who use those companies have less money to spend, and this means that our economy gets even slower, and that means less jobs/higher unemployment.


#8

This story, as written, makes no sense at all.

Hospitals do not have networks. Insurance companies do. Obamacare is a framework, it is not a health plan.

I think what the story is trying to say is that the plans offered on the Marketplaces have reduced networks with limited choices for hospitals. That is what I see in Northern VA, although there is a hospital system that is running a health plan, so, of course, if you buy that plan you have access to the premiere hospital system in the region.

There is a preponderance of HMOs on the Virginia exchange offered in Northern VA. That does reduce costs but limits choice.


#9

[quote="PaulinVA, post:8, topic:343801"]
Obamacare is a framework, it is not a health plan.

[/quote]

Agreed. It's not a health plan.

Obamacare is exactly what Justice Roberts said it is; a tax. It's a tax, the purpose of which is to redistribute income from one segment of the middle class to another. And it does do that; not very well, but it does do it.


#10

The government being the middleman, taking out its share of course.


#11

[quote="Ridgerunner, post:9, topic:343801"]
Agreed. It's not a health plan.

Obamacare is exactly what Justice Roberts said it is; a tax. It's a tax, the purpose of which is to redistribute income from one segment of the middle class to another. And it does do that; not very well, but it does do it.

[/quote]

It's a law to ensure that people have adequate health coverage. That is upsets the anti-government crowd is just a bonus.:)


#12

[quote="Mickey_Finn, post:11, topic:343801"]
It's a law to ensure that people have adequate health coverage. That is upsets the anti-government crowd is just a bonus.:)

[/quote]

Yes, the government is confiscating all this money from people to provide others with "coverage". Big deal. The focus should be on care, not coverage.


#13

I think that the high deductibles I have been reading about are a major concern for providers.


#14

[quote="oldcelt, post:13, topic:343801"]
I think that the high deductibles I have been reading about are a major concern for providers.

[/quote]

I don't understand the brouhaha over deductibles. The plan offered through my employer with the lowest premium had a deductible of $2500 before Obamacare was even conceived so I question whether the deductibles are actually higher than they were before or if people are just now noticing what the deductibles are. High deductibles for plans with low premiums have always been the case. :shrug:


#15

I doubt many conservatives are upset over people having adequate health coverage. But Obamacare most certainly isn’t one, and costs a great deal of money.

But there are things to be upset about, even forgetting the miserable failure of the no-bid computer contract given to Michelle Obama’s classmate.

-17 million (later estimates suggest 20 million) are going to be added to an already overcrowded Medicaid.
-Billions are taken out of Medicare. The chief actuary for Medicare says it will soon pay less than Medicaid.
-Deductibles are high under Obamacare even for the subsidized, and coverage is wretched in the lowest-cost plans.
-For many, if not most, premiums are going up (58% in my state, it is said) because of the added mandates like requiring a male to be covered by maternity coverage and requiring a female to have it no matter what her age is, and pay for Viagra to boot. It requires people who wouldn’t touch drugs or alcohol for anything, to have coverage for drug and alcohol rehab. It requires the indisputably sane to have mental health coverage. In short, it’s an utterly brainless “one size fits all” thing that does not allow people to make choices.
-It’s “anti-family” in some ways. Two unmarried people living together can get subsidies when married people making the same money can’t. It penalizes people for having teenagers working for their college money.

As strange as it may seem, some people prefer to have some choice in their coverage.


#16

[quote="PaulinVA, post:12, topic:343801"]
Yes, the government is confiscating all this money from people to provide others with "coverage". Big deal. The focus should be on care, not coverage.

[/quote]

I doubt the focus is on care. Think of it, the plan has the potential of running Catholic hospitals out of business because they will not, should not comply with the HHS Mandate.
(Of course, if your goal is a single payer system, you have to get rid of the Catholic health care system.)

If the emphasis were truly on care, the government would be doing everything it can to get out of the health care field.

Jon


#17

How exactly will lower income folks pay these high deductibles? I have a $2500 deductible which. To help offset that I put $200 away a month in a HSA. My employer contributes $1000 per year to the HSA. If you're just getting by, where's that money going to come from? My guess is providers will just start writing it off and making up the difference by charging everyone more.


#18

[quote="WildeKurt, post:17, topic:343801"]
How exactly will lower income folks pay these high deductibles? I have a $2500 deductible which. To help offset that I put $200 away a month in a HSA. My employer contributes $1000 per year to the HSA. If you're just getting by, where's that money going to come from? My guess is providers will just start writing it off and making up the difference by charging everyone more.

[/quote]

Probably correct. If the providers are forced to discount to people on the low-pay plans, they'll up the charges to everyone else. The insurers will then be forced to raise premiums. The subsidized won't mind too much about that, many others will simply have to bankrupt themselves to pay the premiums.

What an irony this all is. An administration that purports to believe that spending borrowed money necessarily improves the economy is going to push more and more of peoples' earned income into subsidies for others. I can't even imagine how much money this is going to take out of the rest of the economy.


#19

[quote="JonNC, post:16, topic:343801"]
I doubt the focus is on care. Think of it, the plan has the potential of running Catholic hospitals out of business because they will not, should not comply with the HHS Mandate.
(Of course, if your goal is a single payer system, you have to get rid of the Catholic health care system.)

If the emphasis were truly on care, the government would be doing everything it can to get out of the health care field.

Jon

[/quote]

The people in government, especially the liberals in power now, believe that government can solve all of our problems. We are seeing now, yet again, that is not the case.

The problem with talking about "care" versus coverage is that the government paying for care is, well, single payer. A lot of people will not listen to any single-payer argument, because our government is unable to manage anything big. It's the nature of our political structure and the kinds of people that are attracted to work in government.

Solving the healthcare crisis by mandating everyone have health insurance is like solving the homeless problem by mandating everyone buy a house.


#20

Good argument and analogy. However, even if we remove all the mandates from Obamacare, we’re still left with the mandate that everyone receives emergency care. Someone has to pay for that and chances are it’s either you or your employer.


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