Tough Time With New Wording At Mass


#1

I have noticed that many in the church I attend are still not familiar with the new wording of the litury including an older priest. The parish is a bilingual one with most masses in Spanish and I go to one of few English servcies. I am curious if this is occurring in other churches in the U.S. parishes? Also, was the wording in the Eucharist prayers one through four changed, too, or did they remain the same?


#2

I still don't have it all memorized. I have to look at the reference card, especially for the Gloria.


#3

My parish has really stepped it up and I am not hearing mistakes very often any more.

Yes, the wording in the Eucharistic Prayers has also changed.


#4

Maybe I'm too set in my ways, but even after all these months the new wording still seems awkward and uncomfortable. It might supposed to be going back to more original language and meaning, but I personally think that you can keep wording more modern and still be faithful to the original intent. JMHO.


#5

[quote="Beachcomber, post:4, topic:292749"]
Maybe I'm too set in my ways, but even after all these months the new wording still seems awkward and uncomfortable. It might supposed to be going back to more original language and meaning, but I personally think that you can keep wording more modern and still be faithful to the original intent. JMHO.

[/quote]

I don't have a problem with the new wording but I must admit that unless I'm being vigilant "And also with you" comes tripping off my tongue, particularly before the Gospel when I'm not following the card. I have not memorized the Gloria or the Apostles Creed yet.


#6

[quote="Phemie, post:5, topic:292749"]
I don't have a problem with the new wording but I must admit that unless I'm being vigilant "And also with you" comes tripping off my tongue, particularly before the Gospel when I'm not following the card. I have not memorized the Gloria or the Apostles Creed yet.

[/quote]

We sing the Gloria...no problem. Got it.

I get thrown when we have a visiting priest and do the Nicene creed. I have to use the card.

I honestly thought we would all get it down by now!


#7

[quote="Cordelil, post:1, topic:292749"]
I have noticed that many in the church I attend are still not familiar with the new wording of the litury including an older priest. The parish is a bilingual one with most masses in Spanish and I go to one of few English servcies. I am curious if this is occurring in other churches in the U.S. parishes? Also, was the wording in the Eucharist prayers one through four changed, too, or did they remain the same?

[/quote]

The priests I encounter all seem to have it together, but older priests have a tougher time learning the new wording/translation, because they have been saying the old translation for so long, and their memory not what it used to be.

Yes, the Eucharistic prayers were all changed (re-translated) as well. What I notice is most learn the new Eucharistic Prayer #2 very well and say this one most of the time, so they are used to it.


#8

At my parish it has gotten generally better. The priests in my parish have tended to do the Apostles Creed more often though after the changes, but I actually wish my priests would do the Nicene Creed more so we could actually memorize the changes.

Also, one of our priests is 92, and although he is pretty sharp for his age, he isn't as consistent as he should be in some parts. I think this makes it harder for us.


#9

[quote="Cordelil, post:1, topic:292749"]
The parish is a bilingual one with most masses in Spanish and I go to one of few English servcies. I am curious if this is occurring in other churches in the U.S. parishes? Also, was the wording in the Eucharist prayers one through four changed, too, or did they remain the same?

[/quote]

AFAIK, only the wording in the English Mass has changed. The Spanish Mass has not been affected, although there has been discussion on changing these texts as well.


#10

[quote="Holly3278, post:2, topic:292749"]
I still don't have it all memorized. I have to look at the reference card, especially for the Gloria.

[/quote]

Yes..thank God for the reference card!!


#11

Nothing wrong with using cards or missals. The Mass is not a memorization contest.


#12

The final response in the Preface dialogue catches a lot of people. Still hearing "it is right to give him thanks and praise".
Also "Lord I am not worthy to receive you under my roof"!
The elder priest in my parish is 80+ and he the new translation word perfect. Its his younger colleagues who mix and match new and old which is confusing. The new responses will not become automatic for us when we are being use the old ones sometimes. I guess it was always going to take time to make the transition.


#13

Take 1 hr. break from your day. Print out the new form of the mass. Memorize memorize memorize.

Worked for me.

:highprayer:


#14

I attend Mass in a Polish Parish that has only two Priests, both of which were born, educated and ordained in Poland. Both speak heavily accented English. This church has only two Masses a week in English, and most of the attendants who attend these English Masses have Polish as their first language.
In my observation, neither the Priests nor the congregation have any problem with the new, more accurate translation of the Mass in English. In fact, the English translation is quite close to the Polish translation of the Latin Mass, just as I am sure is the Spanish translation.
I think the reason for the deviation in the original translation, was the well meaning, but ill advised attempt to make the Mass more palatable to our Protestant bretheren in the US.
The translation of the Mass used until the recent reform was closer to the Episcopal Churches Book of Common Prayer than it was to a direct translation of the Latin.
Unfortunately, we have two or three generations of people who never knew the beauty of the Latin prayers, and it will take them a while to adapt....just as many of us had to adjust to the Mass in languages other than Latin.


#15

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:14, topic:292749"]
In fact, the English translation is quite close to the Polish translation of the Latin Mass, just as I am sure is the Spanish translation.

[/quote]

That's quite debatable. For example, the translated Dominus vobiscum is "Pan z wami" ("The Lord IS with you") in Polish. ("The Lord be with you" would be "Niech Pan będzie z wami," which it isn't in the texts.) Meanwhile the Spanish consecration is still "por vosotros y por todos los hombres" ("for you and for all men") And so on.

I'm afraid synchronization in all the translations has got a long way to go, if it gets there at all.

The translation of the Mass used until the recent reform was closer to the Episcopal Churches Book of Common Prayer than it was to a direct translation of the Latin.

Yes, except for the "consubstantial," I would agree with that.


#16

[quote="Beachcomber, post:4, topic:292749"]
Maybe I'm too set in my ways, but even after all these months the new wording still seems awkward and uncomfortable. It might supposed to be going back to more original language and meaning, but I personally think that you can keep wording more modern and still be faithful to the original intent. JMHO.

[/quote]

Such as....?


#17

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:14, topic:292749"]
In fact, the English translation is quite close to the Polish translation of the Latin Mass, just as I am sure is the Spanish translation.

[/quote]

That's quite debatable. For example, the translated Dominus vobiscum is "Pan z wami" ("The Lord IS with you") in Polish. ("The Lord be with you" would be "Niech Pan będzie z wami," which it isn't in the texts.) Meanwhile the Spanish consecration is still "por vosotros y por todos los hombres" ("for you and for all men") And so on.

I'm afraid synchronization in all the translations has got a long way to go, if it gets there at all.

The translation of the Mass used until the recent reform was closer to the Episcopal Churches Book of Common Prayer than it was to a direct translation of the Latin.

I would think the newer translation is closer to the older Book of Common Prayer. It appears that the Episcopal Church as well as some of the the Lutheran Churches use a lot of the ICEL language.


#18

[quote="Cordelil, post:1, topic:292749"]
I have noticed that many in the church I attend are still not familiar with the new wording of the litury including an older priest. The parish is a bilingual one with most masses in Spanish and I go to one of few English servcies. I am curious if this is occurring in other churches in the U.S. parishes? Also, was the wording in the Eucharist prayers one through four changed, too, or did they remain the same?

[/quote]

The parishes around here have it down cold. You rarely hear mistakes anymore. It's been the better part of a year.

If you're still having trouble use the card. That's what they're for.


#19

I am still having tropuble with it. I have been doing it one way for over 30 years and now I have to change. Furthermore, some of us go to a nursing home every Monday to help with services and use the old way. People in their 70s, 80s and 90s and various stages of alzheimers are not going to use new. So then we use the old way.


#20

I stumbled over the, "Lord I am not worthy..." this past Sunday.

I was really annoyed with myself too. :mad: I have absolutely no problem chanting the words but on Sunday the priest SPOKE the invocation and speaking the words always trips me up. :rolleyes:

I was thinking that I needed to be careful to use the proper words but my mouth just went on autopilot after I said, "Lord I am not worthy," and followed with, "to receive you..." I recognized my mistake immediately but couldn't regroup before it was all over. :shrug:

This being human business is really annoying sometimes! :p


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