Traditional Catholic Pieties

Gratias et pax vobiscum,

Share with me and one another Traditional Catholic Act of Piety which has been forgotten since Vatican II in many Novus Ordo Parishes.

I’ll Start…

One proper Piety which isn’t taught in RCIA anymore is Crossing ones’ self upon entering the threshold of the Church:

**In The Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost (Spirit). Amen.

O Lord, in the multitude of Thy mercies, I will enter into Thy house, and worship Thee in Thy holy temple, and praise Thy name. Amen.**

Gratias

We cross ourselves when going past a Catholic church or the seminary that is almost in our backyard to acknowledge Jesus present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the altar.

We have enthroned the Sacred Heart of Jesus in our home. That seems to be a lost devotion and practice.

We have a Holy Water font in our home and we bless ourselves and our children often.

I am also working on putting pictures of the Sacred Heart of Jesus on the light switch plates with “All for You, Jesus” on the bottom of the plate. Saw it done in a convent that I was in for a retreat recently. My, but it made my stay and participation in the retreat so much nicer. :heart:

How?

Here’s a little leaftlet that has a section on how: Enthronement of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in the Home: Its Purposes Its Rewards

Basically, you just ask a priest to come to your home and go through the ceremony. I was in Ireland for a family funeral a little over a year ago, and most every home I went into had the same Sacred Heart image hanging somewhere. I had the brief opportunity to stop through Knock, and found a copy of the same image in a gift shop there. There is a prayer on the bottom of the image that says:

“The Sacred Heart of Jesus has been solemnly enthroned in this home on the ____ day of __________ by the consecration to Him of all the members of the family, present or absent, living or dead. By this act of love and reparation we desire to recognize Jesus as our Lord and Master. We accept in their entirety the Commandments of God and of His Holy Church; we express our horror at the sacrilegious violation of His Sovereign Rights by individuals, by families and by nations; we condemn all attacks upon the holy laws of Christian marriage, and finally we submit with our whole heart and mind to the authority of the Roman Pontiff, Our Holy Father the Pope.”

There are spaces below the prayer for the signatures of the priest and family members present.

I didn’t know anything about the practice when I bought the picture, I just thought it was an absolutely beautiful image (which I’ve not found anywhere else since) of the Sacred Heart, and since practically everyone had one over there, I couldn’t help myself, I had to have it! A similar one can be found here. I didn’t pay nearly so much for mine though, it’s only an 8 x 10 size image that I have. I don’t have in enthroned yet though, I’m waiting till we get our new home. I don’t know how it works if you happen to move.

Thank you so much!

We have a Home Altar in the kitchen above our table.
A Sacred Heart of Jesus plaque is on the Left and just a little lower on the Right (per my convert hubby’s request) is Our Lady of Fatima.

I wonder if I can do the consecration myself?
Getting a priest here would be a miracle in itself. They are SSSSOOOOO busy at my parish, I hate to even ask.

(I did get the car blessed though!)

Give me a ring in 8 years time… God Willing :smiley:

You are the BEST!!! :smiley:

I found the formula for the ceremony here. The leaflet says having a priest there to do it is preferable, but not necessary, so why not give it a try? :thumbsup:

One of the pious practices I don’t think most folks do anymore is cross themselves when they pass a cemetary or a funeral procession, and pray for the souls in Purgatory: “Eternal rest grant to them O Lord, let perpetual light shine upon them. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace. Amen” The practice of praying for the Holy Souls in Purgatory is not given enough time.

I will!
Thanks so much!

Sounds good, and it’s a lovely image. I’ve just got the stock standard Sacred Heart image hanging up in my home with matching Immaculate Heart as well :

http://www.jimmyakin.org/images/sacred_heart.jpg http://www.aloha.net/~mikesch/heart1.jpg

Although I think my personal favourite (which I haven’t been able to find a print of yet) is this one - I find the eyes just wonderfully done:

http://biblia.com/oracion/jesus-face-mercy.jpg

No formal enthronement - I live alone and it would just seem too weird somehow…

Share with me and one another Traditional Catholic Act of Piety which has been forgotten since Vatican II in many Novus Ordo Parishes.

I believe the Holy Spirit inclines us to adopt newer devotions according to the present urgency in the church. Holy Mother wisely promotes them after discerning what the Spirit is saying. For instance, the “little way” was brought to world-wide awareness in naming St. Therese a Doctor of the Church.

Secondly, the Divine Mercy Chaplet is now being prayed in response to Jesus’s urgent plea for intercession while the time of mercy is still present.

That doesn’t mean people forget about former practices and devotions, but we have to respect the attractions of grace and inspiration that may differ in many persons, just as there are differences in each saint. It is not prudent to copy a spirituality of a particular saint and make it one’s own, unless the Lord is guiding in that manner. That should be readily obvious when we consider how different each religious order’s spirituality is.

One proper Piety which isn’t taught in RCIA anymore is Crossing ones’ self upon entering the threshold of the Church:

I have rarely entered a church proper and failed to see people bless themselves. The focus of RCIA centers on the faith itself, and IF the mention of blessing practice is omitted through inadvertence, the convert will quickly learn it through observing other Catholics who do still use the holy water font. I do emphacize “if,” because your own experience may not be reflective of every RCIA program.

Some devotions forgotten were almost a way of life.
Maria Von Trapp (of Sound of Music fame) put out a small book a long time ago about the thing she and her family did per the liturgical seasons. Things like bringing pussywillows to church to be blessed and then decorating their property with them.

We don’t live Catholic as families did when I was a child.

And that is something I think was stolen from my generation. My Catholic elementary schooling was probably as traditional as can reasonably be expected in this day and age, with Stations and Benediction every Friday in Lent, blessing of the classrooms after Epiphany, May crowning, and probably some other little touches like that, but our parents generation never taught us how to LIVE as Catholics. What I got was little remnants of Catholic culture, and I’m sure I got more remnants than many if not most. Now I’ve discovered the traditional rite on my own and wish I knew better how to live a life of traditional piety, but there are not really any sources to draw on other than picking people’s memories… So PLEASE everyone keep contributing to this thread, and thanks for all the input so far.

My Catholic elementary schooling was probably as traditional as can reasonably be expected in this day and age, with Stations and Benediction every Friday in Lent, blessing of the classrooms after Epiphany, May crowning, and probably some other little touches like that, but our parents generation never taught us how to LIVE as Catholics. What I got was little remnants of Catholic culture.

Andreas, you have certainly zeroed in on a very important point. Religious culture holds only the trappings that are not able, of themselves, to produce sanctity or charity, even though they inspire piety and devotion. These are only blessings of “actual” graces and do not bestow the sanctifying grace we receive in the sacraments. I think education regarding priorites may help point us heavenward.

Most important next to the mass and reception of holy communion is personal prayer … not vocal prayer mindlessly recited, but the prayer of the heart that converses with Our Lord.

Some of the most significant words I read long ago from St. Teresa of Avila, pertain to the absolute necessity of prayer coupled with growth in the virtues. She revealed in her autobiography that in her early years, she fulfilled all of the prescriptions proper to being a nun … daily mass, holy communion (though seldom in those days), rosary, and daily recitation of the LOTH. We would think it was sufficient for holiness, for how few of us even go that far! Yet not until she disciplined herself to engage in daily mental prayer with Jesus did she begin to grow in holiness. The first book of deep spiritual influence on her was Third Spiritual Alphabet by Osuna, who instructed with regard to the importance of interior recollection.

While not neglecting practies of piety, my vote would be to spend time daily in mental prayer as she taught it in Way of Perfection.

vatican.va/roman_curia/synod/documents/rc_synod_doc_20050707_instrlabor-xi-assembly_en.html

Sentiments of Adoration


  1. Also requested is a re-presentation of the theological and spiritual basis for adoration as a due preparation for Holy Mass, as a proper disposition in celebrating the sacred mysteries and as a thanksgiving for the gift of the Eucharist. In this regard, some proposed the reestablishing confraternities of the Most Blessed Sacrament, adapting them to the expectations and the needs of people today in their search for God. Eucharistic adoration for the clergy was also encouraged. The suggestion was made to have parishes coordinate days of solemn exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, so that in dioceses—especially larger ones—the People of God might have occasion to adore the Eucharistic Lord in various parishes each week. Restoring the practice of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in those places where it has been abandoned, above all on Sunday afternoons, could lead to an increase in Eucharistic devotion. Vespers or Lauds could be recited before the Blessed Sacrament exposed. An hour of adoration between Masses could be introduced in parishes having many scheduled Masses, for example, afternoon Masses in certain city parishes.

Moreover, other forms of Eucharistic devotion need to be encouraged, such as adoration on Holy Thursday, processions with the Blessed Sacrament, above all on the solemnity of Corpus Christi, Eucharistic visits, Forty Hours Devotion and communal prayer before the Blessed Sacrament exposed. According to the Magisterium, these actions lead to prayer for forgiveness by the faithful, especially for offenses to the Blessed Sacrament.92 Expressions of popular piety connected with the Eucharist, such as songs, floral displays and decorations need to be justly appreciated.

The huge processions around the aisles of the Church before Midnight Solemn High Mass with three priests as deacon, sub-deacon, and main celibrant, and a "million alter boys, Forty Hours Devotion, The annual May Crowning with the church jammed with people, being herded as a class over to confession twice a month by Sister, long lines on Saturday afternoon and evening for Confession, Tuesday Our Lady of Perpetual Help with Rosary and Friday Night Way of the Cross both with Benediction and every week of the year except Good Friday,the 20 minute low masses with no singing, Holy Name Society, Alter Society, Sodality of Our Lady, annual Legion of Decency Pledge:)

Have any deacons in your church?

They are really busy too, but I can ask DetroitSue’s hubby or wait for Brendan!
Good thought!

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