Traditional Catholicism vs Eastern orthodoxy

. Hello, I’m new to this forum. I am a traditionalist Catholic (I’m not a sedevancatist), who is in complete communion with Rome and I accept Pope Francis, as the supreme pontiff of the catholic church. I started this topic with the intention of making a comparison between traditional catholic and Eastern Catholic liturgies and sacraments . Please, I need your answers.

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So, do you want a comparison between Eastern Catholic and Extraordinary Form Roman Rite liturgies or a comparison of Eastern Orthodox and Extraordinary Form Roman Rite liturgies?

There is a difference in that the Eastern Catholic liturgies span 24 Sui Generis Churches in communion with the Roman Pontiff, while the Orthodox are limited to the Byzantine Rite in its Slavic and Greek usages and the Western Rite in its four Usages.

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First of all, welcome to the Catholic Answers Forums! We’re happy to have you here. :grin:

Now, you seek answers. Great! But before any of us can provide any sort of answers we must first have a question. So, what’s your question.

(Full disclosure on my part. I’m an Eastern (Maronite) Catholic who grew up Roman Catholic, spent several years living our Faith in the Byzantine tradition, before finding my spiritual home in the Maronite Catholic Church. I grew up serving the Ordinary Form of the Mass daily throughout my pre-teen and teenage years, and I have a strong fondness (and preference) for it when celebrated properly.)

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I want a comparison between Traditional catholic (extra ordinary form) and Eastern orthodox liturgies. Tnx for your reply.

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Would you like a comparison of externals, or of internal attitudes toward liturgy?

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Have you tried using the search function, which will turn up ample threads, and then read the portions of those threads before they are derailed into bickering about trivialities in liturgy of whatever flavor?

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External features

Well I don’t necessarily think there is comparison. They are different in structure and prayers are very different, I mean you can try to look at each of them and compare some things in them but I don’t think it’s fair to compare Liturgies themselves.

Also, Eastern Catholics of Byzantine Rite use same Liturgy as Orthodox Church- Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. They are fully Catholic but follow different tradition, so they are in communion with the Pope Francis and if you visit their Church you can attend their Liturgy and you can even receive Eucharist at their Liturgy (We are One Church with them, so you can go to Confession to their Priests too for example) . I think that is best way how to understand Divine Liturgy that Orthodox Church also uses.

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Externally only the birds-eye-view of the Liturgy is similar. There is a “Liturgy of the Word” and a “Liturgy of the Eucharist.” Otherwise, almost everything else is different. The prayers are different, the hymns are different, the liturgical calendar is almost completely different, and the readings are all different.

More incense is used. More bells are used. Everything is chanted. The Byzantine Liturgy (and Eastern Liturgy in general) is more “popular” in nature, meaning that a more active participation on the part of the laity is the norm. There’s no kneeling. Communion is received standing. The filioque isn’t in the Creed.

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I think the only way to know is to see both.

Video of a Divine Liturgy (in English): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPPfD_crxQg
Text of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom: https://www.goarch.org/-/the-divine-liturgy-of-saint-john-chrysostom

Video of Extraordinary form of the Mass (Latin): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-9U4sepQX8
Text of the EF (Latin and English): http://www.extraordinaryform.org/ExtraordinaryFormTextLandscape.pdf

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is it true that the Byzantine Rite (Orthodox & EC) allowed their liturgy in a native language way back when? compared to the Latin Rite using only a native language post-Vatican II with the OF Mass.

that seems common in many of the EC churches of Byzantine and other Rites.

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We kneel, but not on Sundays.

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It has always been allowed.

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Yes, indeed. But the OP is asking about the difference in external liturgical practices.

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I just meant that we would kneel on a Liturgy celebrated on a weekday, except during Easter.

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Really? On a weekday Divine Liturgy? At what point do you kneel?

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It’s always been my understanding that you’re not required to do so during a weekday Divine Liturgy- but you can. When people do, it is during the elevation of the gifts. Kneeling is required during a Pre-sanctified Liturgy. Also- I’ll just go ahead and say that even though it isn’t supposed to be done on Sundays- it often is in Antiochian parishes (except during Pascha).

edited: Usually, right at, “Thine own of Thine own, we offer to Thee, in behalf of all, and for all”

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I visited a Greek Orthodox parish church one Sunday, and it was quite remarkable that everyone kneeled – except for me and my Byzantine Catholic friend. And they did it right after the Sanctus. I can only imagine that that Greek Orthodox parish is full of Roman Catholics who fled the Roman Rite.

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As you can tell by the responses, it differs, the people usually do not follow rubrics. I think the obvious occasions would be the Great entrance (I have noticed people doing it at the small entrance as well), the Our Father, doing prostrations together with the Priest during the Anaphora, perhaps when lighting a candle etc.

And yes, we do celebrate liturgies on weekdays. There are some restrictions throughout Lent, but other than that…

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In our UGCC parish, we don’t kneel during Paschaltide. Otherwise, we still kneel on Sundays.

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