Traditional Diocese'


#1

I’ve been thinking about becoming a priest for some time now. However, I would like to be part of a traditional Diocese; one that follows the magesterium of the Church and has good leadership (from the priests and bishop). So please share how you consider these qualities in your diocese are present.


#2

Go, RUN, to diocese run by Bishops Bruskewitz, Burke, Vasa, Olmstead. (I know there are 2 or 3 others, but I can’t think of them right now)

Or In Peterborough, Ontario, Canada - Bishop Nicola De Angelis He’s UNBELIEVABLY WONDERFUL!

There are also wonderfully Catholic religious orders - Fathers of Mercy (I believe) in Kentucky?? Fr. Bill Casey is there.

and Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter.

God bless,
Angel


#3

You would need to look into the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter.

fssp.com/

Ken


#4

[quote=Angels Watchin]Go, RUN, to diocese run by Bishops Bruskewitz, Burke, Vasa, Olmstead. (I know there are 2 or 3 others, but I can’t think of them right now)

Or In Peterborough, Ontario, Canada - Bishop Nicola De Angelis He’s UNBELIEVABLY WONDERFUL!

There are also wonderfully Catholic religious orders - Fathers of Mercy (I believe) in Kentucky?? Fr. Bill Casey is there.

and Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter.

God bless,
Angel
[/quote]

While I agree that Bishop Olmsted (notice that there is no a) is an awesome Bishop, he has not yet been here long enough to clean up the liberal mess that was here before. This place is quite literally a liturgical wasteland other than the TLM. I am hopeful, however, for the future, as I have noticed our seminarians at the TLM in the summer, and also the Bishop is now sending our seminarians to the Josephinum and St. John Vianney in Denver, in my opinion two of some of the better seminaries.

However, I look forward with great hope under the great leadership of the good Bishop Olmsted.


#5

[quote=Angels Watchin]Go, RUN, to diocese run by Bishops Bruskewitz, Burke, Vasa, Olmstead. (I know there are 2 or 3 others, but I can’t think of them right now)

Or In Peterborough, Ontario, Canada - Bishop Nicola De Angelis He’s UNBELIEVABLY WONDERFUL!

There are also wonderfully Catholic religious orders - Fathers of Mercy (I believe) in Kentucky?? Fr. Bill Casey is there.

and Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter.

God bless,
Angel
[/quote]

Fathers of Mercy are wonderful, the parochial vicar at my parish is a Father of Mercy. However, our diocese (Lexington) is somewhat liberal but our bishop is orthodox and the situation is improving, the Archdiocese of Louisville and the Diocese of Owensboro are very liberal and have liberal bishops, and I have heard that the Covington Diocese is conservative.


#6

You are only sixteen. Most religious orders and dioceses would prefer it if you went to college or University for a few years before entering the seminary . At least finish highschool first. The monastery/seminary Westminister Abbey near Vancouver has a junior (highschool) seminary but from experience it is not a good idea to do formation there despite being extremely traditional.

When I wanted to become a priest my saintly Irish pastor suggested I finish school first; it was well worth it. For though I did enjoy my time in the seminary after University, those extra few years were important in helping me make a good mature decision not to become a priest.

Don’t just jump at any diocese or religious order because they are conservative or traditional. It really depends on the charisms of the order or the charisms of the secular priesthood and how those fit with your vocation. If you feel called to missionary work, look at missionary orders like the Maryknoll priests in the USA, the OMI and Scarborough Missions in Canada or the SVDs (a personal favorite) all over the world, if you want to teach or work with children think of the Salesians. Work with the poor, think Fransiscan. The monastic orders are something completely different. And the Jesuits and Dominicans have a long history of higher studies. The FSSP concentrate on the old Tridentine Latin Mass though other than teaching the priests Latin; their seminary’s intellectual formation is extraordinarily poor. As you can see they are very different.

Furthermore, even in a traditional diocese you might want to be in a rural center, or an urban center. In the mountains, in the plains, near the ocean, near your family.

There is much to think about before jumping into a vocation merely because it is ‘traditional’.


#7

I love our Bishop Loverde here in NOVA


#8

Our bishop is perhaps the most non controversial bishop ever to exist - simply because he avoids any message that may cause any type of unrest or conflict.

He is the best bishop ever, and even though he has perhaps a tiny liberal tendancy, that is no problem for me, he is uber cool - his name is Bishop Brian Noble - he is the best :thumbsup:

Cardinal Murphy O’Connor is pretty darn cool aswell :wink:


#9

I haven’t been to many churches in the diocese, but my parish is quite traditional, and I love it so much! :love:

The church itself is a masterpiece. It was built in the 1940s, and still has the altar rail, with an elevated altar, and the crucifix and tabernacle at front and center. It has gorgeous statues and incredible stained glass windows, devoted to various saints. At the back is a huge organ, and the music is always very traditional and well-performed. Every Saturday for the anticipatory Mass, we have a Gregorian chant choir. It creates such a special atmosphere! Our priest is always faithful to the liturgy and prefers the Roman Canon Eucharistic Prayer. He and the deacons always take their time to give a good, thoughtful homily. The young altar servers are always very respectful and focused.

It’s exactly as a Catholic church should be, in my opinion! :slight_smile: I feel so blessed that this was the church I chose. Em, actually, I feel it was chosen for me, but that’s another, somewhat long, story. :wink:

In any case, blessedrosary, good luck in your journey. I didn’t realize at first how young you are. I recommend a good Catholic university. I myself attended Loyola New Orleans, and personally, I couldn’t imagine a better education. Admittedly, I wasn’t a practicing Catholic at the time, but the Jesuits are outstanding educators, and there were several young men in my class who were considering the priesthood. Our prayers are with you! :thumbsup:


#10

[quote=blessedrosary]I’ve been thinking about becoming a priest for some time now. However, I would like to be part of a traditional Diocese; one that follows the magesterium of the Church and has good leadership (from the priests and bishop). So please share how you consider these qualities in your diocese are present.
[/quote]

I tried to post a reply to this yesterday, but my internet connection crashed as I was trying to send.

It may be nice to go where at least the clergy are orthodox, so you won’t get criticism from your bishop or the other priests in the area on how you do things when you do things right- but what about those who want orthodoxy, aren’t in an orthodox place, and cannot move? What about those who are earnestly searching for truth, but have no one to show it to them? Why try to fix what is already being fixed? We *desperately *need more young men to go to places that have abandoned their Catholic faith- either altogether, or only want it to exist to provide social services- not to save souls from going to hell. We need people to pray for change- and to actively work to bring back orthodoxy where they are.

My diocese- the Diocese of Kansas City-Saint Joseph- was rather liberal (granted, it didn’t get as crazy as LA has, but it wasn’t great). Bishop Sullivan let things get pretty crazy in the 70’s. Bishop Boland was a nice person and seemed like a holy man, but didn’t really crack down on liturgical abuse or moral relativism among the priests in the diocese. We had liturgical dancers here and there, we had nuns assigned as administrators of parishes who gave the homilies during Mass, and wanted to be priests. We had a “ministry” that welcomed lesbians and gays with open arms- in, of all places, the diocesan Cathedral- the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Little attention was given to the seminarians. Things were changing for the better everywhere around here- everywhere, it seemed, but here

After much prayer (no doubt), things are finally turning around here. We have a new bishop now who promotes and encourages vocations much more. He cleaned out the chancery (of the nuns who wanted to control everything, and the priests who wouldn’t stand for anything) within minutes of taking control of the diocese. We have a wonderful group of seminarians who will make excellent priests someday- they stuck it out- most of them started the seminary here, or were planning to start- before we even knew who our new bishop would be- that things would get better soon. Where would we have been had they all gone to St. Louis or Lincoln?

God doesn’t always call us to the places that look the nicest or are the easiest to do what is right. He calls us where we are needed the most. He calls us to preach the Gospel to ALL nations. The corporal works of mercy is to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, etc. The spiritual works of mercy parallel this- though worded differently- wouldn’t it make sense to say “feed the spiritually hungry”, “give drink to the spiritually thirsty”, etc? It basically means the same thing as the spiritual works of mercy as we know them to be. If everyone who is orthodox runs off to a few places that are already orthodox, and strong in their faith, then it spiritually starves those who are in unorthodox dioceses- and cannot pack up and leave (for whatever reason).

One more thing I should add is that no place is perfect. The pope can move any bishop he wants whenever he wants wherever he wants. Tomorrow, a new bishop could be assigned to Lincoln or St. Louis who is as heterodox as you can get- and could make things very hard for orthodox priests and laity there. I don’t see that happening- but it could.

Pray about it- God will let you know where he wants you. It will have it’s ugly parts, but it will also have many rewards- the greatest being the ability to celebrate the Mass- to bring God Himself down on the altar.

Pray about it- God will let you know where he wants you. It will have it’s ugly parts, but it will also have many rewards- the greatest being the ability to celebrate the Mass- to bring God Himself down on the altar.


#11

[quote=Libero]Our bishop is perhaps the most non controversial bishop ever to exist - simply because he avoids any message that may cause any type of unrest or conflict.

He is the best bishop ever, and even though he has perhaps a tiny liberal tendancy, that is no problem for me, he is uber cool - his name is Bishop Brian Noble - he is the best :thumbsup:

[/quote]

I mean this in all charity, but someone once said- I think it was Dante- that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who are indifferent- who don’t stand for anything.

St. Basil once said “the streets of hell are paved with the skulls of rotten bishops”.

Bottom line- if a bishop doesn’t cause controversy- he’s not doing his job. If we don’t cause controversy, we’re not doing our jobs.


#12

Boy, we are lucky here in St.Louis, we have Archbishop Burke, and my family and I attend St.Francis De Sales Oratory administered by the Institute of Christ the King, Sovereign Priest.
All the Masses and sacraments are administered under the 1962 Missal.

:thumbsup:


#13

Yep, of course Lincoln is a good place. I just went to the ordination to the orders of Subdiaconate and Diaconate for the FSSP here in Lincoln-presided over by Bishop Bruskewicz. It is really something to see a bishop in his traditional vesments, including the gloves.

I also love Omaha with Archbishop Curtiss, he gave the indult for the traditional Mass and he really keeps up the schools around the diocese.


#14

Diocese of Rockford (pretty much) or Diocese of Peoria (way, way traditional).


#15

There is no such thing as a perfect diocese or a perfect bishop. If you are interested in becoming a diocesian priest, why not start with where you currently live?


#16

[quote=m134e5]I mean this in all charity, but someone once said- I think it was Dante- that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who are indifferent- who don’t stand for anything.

St. Basil once said “the streets of hell are paved with the skulls of rotten bishops”.

Bottom line- if a bishop doesn’t cause controversy- he’s not doing his job. If we don’t cause controversy, we’re not doing our jobs.
[/quote]

I understand your point, but you may notice that there is a difference in the type of religious practice in America and Britain. America is very vocal about it’s religious belief, politics founded strongly on religion, Britain ditched that a while ago, when we ditched our status as a Theocracy, the church recognised that more damage than good would come from meddling in matters of controversy. I like my diocese, and to be honest, I think you would struggle to find a vocal bishop who is always going on about public matters in England - if you can find one, then well done - they are hard to come by :stuck_out_tongue: :smiley:


#17

[quote=cheese_sdc]There is no such thing as a perfect diocese or a perfect bishop. If you are interested in becoming a diocesian priest, why not start with where you currently live?
[/quote]

Good idea, but…

if you live in LA or in Orange County, you’d end up at St. John’s seminary in Carmarillo and, if I remember correctly, in one of the classes ordained in the 60’s or 70’s, over 30% had been either accused or convicted! (child molesting!) From there came Cdnl. Mahony, Bishop Tod Brown,and many others! (see Mahony’s Cronies)
bishop-accountability.org/ca-la/mahony-2002-06-a.htm#cronies

Get a copy of Good Bye, Good Men by Michael Rose before you enter any seminary.

God bless,
Angel


#18

[quote=Libero]Our bishop is perhaps the most non controversial bishop ever to exist - simply because he avoids any message that may cause any type of unrest or conflict.

He is the best bishop ever, and even though he has perhaps a tiny liberal tendancy, that is no problem for me, he is uber cool - his name is Bishop Brian Noble - he is the best :thumbsup:

Cardinal Murphy O’Connor is pretty darn cool aswell :wink:
[/quote]

That brings a passage of scripture to mind:
“I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot. I would thou wert cold or hot. But because thou art lukewarm and neither cold nor hot, I will vomit thee out of my mouth.” (Apoc. 3:15,16)


#19

Our Diocese is okay, with some parishes being great, while others are horrible. I am praying for Bishop Thomas to step it up and make decitions for the good of the Diocese and Church, not the good of a few people.


#20

I am not sure how to answer the poll…my diocese(Ft.Worth), has a new bishop…my parish however, sadly I would classify as liberal. I am sure there are some traditional Catholics in the parish, but it seems that the libs are in control right now.

Peace be with you…Pam


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