Traditional Missal and Study Bible?

Hello all,
I’m staying away from the forums for lent, but I need your advice for something.

I’ve recently started to attend the Traditional mass. My home made missal (a printout binded by elastics) isn’t cutting it and I’m dying for a proper missal. Suggestions?

I’d love to use chapters.ca online, but any suggestions would be great.

I want something that will last with either a hard cover or leather cover.

Extras like prayers, feasts etc would always be nice too :).

Oh and I would love for it to have directions in it, like when to stand/kneel, make sign of the cross etc. Does such a missals even exist? Having the various directions is what I’m really after.

And would the missal have the gospel reading for the day like N.O missals? My priest does his homily bilingually but only reads the Gospel in French.

I’m also taking Catholic and religious studies courses for my minors. I currently have a NAB study bible, but i’ve been noticing very liberal notations. I’ve only had this bible for a year, and already it’s falling apart on me because it’s a soft cover and I have to carry it around all over campus. So I’m wondering if there are any Traditional/conservative (True to the Tradition) minded study bibles. It has to be an academically acceptable translation i.e no paraphrase translations like the GNB and should be as accurate as possible to the original texts.

I would prefer online sites because the city I’m in doesn’t have any religious/catholic bookstores that sell English books. It would be even better if it is an online site that operates in Canada.

Thanks,
Freshman.

I’ve heard the Haydock Study Bible is best (it’s a Douay Rheims).

Here it is partially online (all of the NT and part of the OT).
haydock1859.tripod.com/

Honestly, I like Bishop Challoner’s notes that are in most standard editions of the Douay Rheims Version. :slight_smile:

Just such a version with his notes is online here:

drbo.org

I have reservations re: Douay Rheims version. I’m sure it will do fine in my Catholic classes, but my religious studies courses are mostly ran by Protestant professors. I vagulely remeber my prof from last semester explaining that Latin Vulgate translations aren’t acceptable.
I may get the DR anyway, but I’m curious if there are any translations made from more recently found sources i.e post dead sea scrolls.

But if I have to settle with Douay Rheims version in order to get good o’lCatlick’ notes, then I’ll settle with that.

Besides that, suggestions re:missal are also welcomed.

Depending on where you attend Tridentine Mass there may or may not be these red booklets from the Ecclessia Dei commision that have the Ordinary of the Mass and instructions for the congregation (as well as instructions for traditional confession and prayers for before and after Mass).

As for an actual Missal, I would suggest either the Baronius Press or Angelus Press versions which have additional prayers and the Propers in Latin and English. I have an old St. Joseph’s Daily Missal which is quite useful, although the Propers are only in English.

As for a Bible, my spiritual director, who is quite orthodox, reccomended the Ignatius Press Study Bible for the New Testament. Each NT Book is a separate volume with extensive commentary, although you’ll have to purchase them.

Of course, the standard English-language Bible for traditional Catholics is the Douay-Rheims version.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Latin Vulgate

From a purely Catholic point of view, I believe it was Venerable Pope Pius XII who declared that the Latin Vulgate is free from all errors in regards to faith and morals. No other version of the Bible enjoys such status in the Church.

He also was first (in a long time at least) to allow translations to be made from sources other than vulgate

Good to see yeah Caesar,

The parish I’m attending at the moment is very French. They have no material in English.

Those versions you mentioned, would they have instructions for the various actions like when to stand, kneel make the sign of the cross, strike breast etc? Is that standard in these missals? Do I need to specifically look out for this? Is this even available in the missals?

And would these missals have the readings for the various days in them?

I know the DH is pretty standard for Catholics, but I’ve also come across the NSRV-CE, which I think my Protestant/non-religious profs would be more accepting of. The problem I think I will have is looking for a version with commentary that is in line with the Church. As I said the NAB I have right now is great because it is a university version and has extensive notes especially regarding history, but over and over again the notes can be very “liberal” and I hate being annoyed when I’m assigned to read huge sections of a tedious book like Numbers (well, I think its tedious reading).

At the same time, keep mentioning your favourite study version of the DH (hardcover), I may end up settling for a DH.

Anyway, thanks for the comments and keep them coming!

I personally have no problems with the Vulgate, and I accept his Holiness’ remarks. I even hope I can someday read it in the original Latin. But for the sake of my secular university I want to keep the options open for a non-vulgate version. And like I said, I may even settle with a vulgate.

Yes, they would have instructions for kneeling, sitting, standing and such. Although I can tell you that- Stand for the entrance procession, kneel for the prayers at the foot of the altar until the Epistle when you may sit, and then stand for the Gospel, sit for the homily (unless Father re-reads the Gospel in vernacular), stand for the Creed (and kneel at the relevant part), kneel for the Canon and after communion, then stand for the recession :thumbsup:

And yes, these Missals have the daily prayers, which are called the Propers.

I know the DH is pretty standard for Catholics, but I’ve also come across the NSRV-CE, which I think my Protestant/non-religious profs would be more accepting of. The problem I think I will have is looking for a version with commentary that is in line with the Church. As I said the NAB I have right now is great because it is a university version and has extensive notes especially regarding history, but over and over again the notes can be very “liberal” and I hate being annoyed when I’m assigned to read huge sections of a tedious book like Numbers (well, I think its tedious reading).

Ah yes, I know about this problem, and its not just in Bibles :frowning:

I think the difficulty is that most of the scholars who work with modern translations come from a direction that is far more historical-critical than what most traditional commentators would use. Traditionalists are not the sort to make study bibles in the modern sense because they typically are not involved in the “establishment” that produces those sorts of products. It would be interesting, actually, to have a thread devoted to finding traditionalists who are active in theological academia, since they seem to be few and far between.

for the purposes of this course RSV-CE is your best bet, comparable to the most “traditional” Protestant translations because it was done jointly, and translated from original languages, not the Vulgate. It is usually the best to use in forums with both Catholics and non-Catholics. The Navarre commentary may be out of your budget, but the Ignatius Press book-by-book study volumes are affordable and excellent.

suggestions:
(1) Lefebvre, Dom Gaspar: THE SAINT ANDREW DAILY MISSAL WITH VESPERS FOR SUNDAYS AND FEASTS AND KYRIALE. Most complete missal (according to www.traditio.com.) Reprint of the 1945 edition. 1978+ pages, hardbound with gilt page edges and five ribbon markers, from St. Bonaventure Publications.

(2) Lasance, F.X.: THE NEW ROMAN MISSAL. The second most complete missal in print (according to www.traditio.com)). Published in 1945, updated to 1958. 1852 pages, red and black type, black hardcover with gilded edges and ribbon markers, from Catholic Treasures Books

(3) Roman Catholic Daily Missal 1962 by Angelus Press

(4)Daily Missal 1962 by Angelus Press

All are sufficient but the first two if published on or prior to 1945, might be to some more desirable since it excludes any changes that may have begun leading up to the Novus Ordo Missae of 1969. I have 2,3, and 4 use 3 & 4 . I think the Angelus press attract me because they have side bar notes, that explain everything that is going on in the mass, actions, origins, kneel, stand, small illustrations, etc. But Lasance Missal has large illustrations. You may want to compare and discover what is to your liking.

  1. I’m also taking Catholic and religious studies courses for my minors. I currently have a NAB study bible, but i’ve been noticing very liberal notations. I’ve only had this bible for a year, and already it’s falling apart on me because it’s a soft cover and I have to carry it around all over campus. So I’m wondering if there are any Traditional/conservative (True to the Tradition) minded study bibles. It has to be an academically acceptable translation i.e no paraphrase translations like the GNB and should be as accurate as possible to the original texts.

I only use the Holy Bible (Douay-Rheims=DR) and by good conscience cannot suggest any other book. I consider this the only authoritative English translation of the Latin Vulgate. But you must realize for yourself what is best for your course of study. I suggest you do have a copy of Holy Bible (DR) for yourself as you can compare, when time permits, with other books during the course of your study. If you read Latin, the Latin Vulgate of St Jerome would of course be your best choice.

I would prefer online sites because the city I’m in doesn’t have any religious/catholic bookstores that sell English books. It would be even better if it is an online site that operates in Canada.

Try St. Francis books (www.stfrancisbooks.com) they are located in Ontario Canada. They may be slow, since they are family run business far from big cities, but they are honest and kind. (also www.baroniuspress.com, www.angeluspress.org, www.Tanbooks.com, fssp.com/main/publications.html#Missals, www.allcatholicbooks.com) You can give these cites to others so that they too may get Traditional missals and the Holy Bible (DR), since it took me some time to find some of these cites.
I hope this helps you and am happy you have started to attend the Traditional Latin Mass.

I have both the Angelus Press Missal, the Douay Rheims Bible and the Ignatius Press RSV 2nd Catholic Edition. I use both bibles simultaneously when studying. I love all three. Good luck and God Bless.

Pax,

Matt

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