Translate Latin phrases please

Hello,

I am using a latin text that was printed in the 1950’s to teach myself latin. The exercise that I am on now has some phrases that has me stumped. Could any of you translate them for me?

1.Amici Dei Christianos laudant. I believe that Christianos is the direct object of the verb they praise but I can’t figure out the first part. Is it God’s friends praise Christians?

  1. Christiani Filium Dei laudant. It can’t be Christians praise God’s brothers. I think that I am confusing myself.

  2. Christiani Filium Mariae laudant. Christians praise Mary’s brothers?

I am using a text by a Father Henle. So far it has been pretty easy to follow, but these three sentences have me very confused.

[quote=deb1]Hello,

1.Amici Dei Christianos laudant.

  1. Christiani Filium Dei laudant.

  2. Christiani Filium Mariae laudant
    [/quote]

Guesses:

  1. My fellow Christians, praise God. (not sure)

  2. Praise be to Christ, Son of God.

  3. Praise be to Christ, Son of Mary.

1) Amici Dei Christianos laudant.
-The friends of God praise Christians. (You had this one right.)

2) Christiani Filium Dei laudant.
-Christians praise the Son of God.

3) Christiani Filium Mariae laudant.
-Christians praise the Son of Mary.

Filium is the Accusative singular form of Filius, meaning son. It is the direct object in the last two sentences.

Frater means brother.

It’s awesome that you’re learning Latin. I started out on Father Henle as well. It’s good stuff.

Thank you, so much. I was very confused. I homeschool and my son is going to be learning latin this year for his foreign language. Because I am the teacher, I have to-of course-learn the language. :slight_smile: Thus far I am really enjoying going through the book for the first year. I hope to finish it before school starts in the fall.

To bad they don’t offer Latin at my school.

I can’t wait to learn it in the seminary.

[quote=BloodandFire]To bad they don’t offer Latin at my school.

I can’t wait to learn it in the seminary.
[/quote]

I am surprised that thus far it isn’t more difficult. I am not certain if Henle is simply a good textbook or if I am actually a genius.:smiley: For anyone who is interested…Elizabeth Seton carries the Henle books. You need a grammar book and a first year textbook. My order cost me less then fifty dollars and my order included my fourth grade daughter’s english book!!

[quote=deb1]Hello,

I am using a latin text that was printed in the 1950’s to teach myself latin. The exercise that I am on now has some phrases that has me stumped. Could any of you translate them for me?

1.Amici Dei Christianos laudant. I believe that Christianos is the direct object of the verb they praise but I can’t figure out the first part. Is it God’s friends praise Christians?
[/quote]

Christianos can only be an accusative and direct object in the above sentence. The best interpretation I can think of is.

“They praise the Christians of the loving God.”

  1. Christiani Filium Dei laudant. It can’t be Christians praise God’s brothers. I think that I am confusing myself.

Filium means “son”. It is an accusative singular. Christiani is nominative plural for “Christians”.

“The Christians praise the Son of God.”

  1. Christiani Filium Mariae laudant. Christians praise Mary’s brothers?

I am using a text by a Father Henle. So far it has been pretty easy to follow, but these three sentences have me very confused.

“The Christians prase the Son of Mary.”

[quote=Promotor Fidei]Guesses:

  1. My fellow Christians, praise God. (not sure)
    [/quote]

iIt could be,

“Friends, praise the Christians of God.”

“Amici Dei Christianos laudant” is Friends of God praise Christians. Laudant is the 3rd person plural present tense form. The imperative form (command–praise!) would be lauda (singular), laudate (plural.)

Close the thread. Post #3 (PhilNeri) answered the question correctly.

[quote=mercygate]Close the thread. Post #3 (PhilNeri) answered the question correctly.
[/quote]

Gee, thanks.:nerd:

I am jealous… I want to learn Latin!

[quote=Fashina86]I am jealous… I want to learn Latin!
[/quote]

What’s stopping you?

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