Translations official and unofficial?


#1

So what is the official translation of the Holy Bible (United States and also Universal Church?

I have always thought New American Bible for U.S.

But what about the Duey Rhemes. Or any others there are hundreds.

What about St.Joseph's version and such?


#2

There are translations approved for liturgical use -- the NAB in the United States and other translations in other countries. And there are translations approved for personal use which is a long list, as you've said.

If you're doing something with a group like Bible study, then it's helpful if everyone uses the same translation. Otherwise, for your own prayer and study, you can use the translation that is most meaningful to you.


#3

[quote="andy92, post:1, topic:317311"]
So what is the official translation of the Holy Bible (United States and also Universal Church? I have always thought New American Bible for U.S. But what about the Douay-Rheims. Or any others there are hundreds.

[/quote]

As was mentioned above, there is no "official" Catholic Bible translation for English speaking Catholics, only translations that are approved for liturgical use. Practically speaking, for Americans, this is usually the NABRE. However, to muddy the waters further, the NAB version we hear in the liturgy is slightly different that what is found in the NABRE. This is because they sometimes have to condense readings for the sake of time or insert a name (for example, "Jesus" instead of "he") so that it makes more sense to the listeners who don't have the full text in front of them. Sometimes, they insert more traditional language in the liturgical text, such as from Luke 1:28.

When the Vatican releases it's official documents in English, they use the Revised Standard Version - Catholic Edition (RSV-CE).

What about St.Joseph's version and such?

This version is simply the NABRE in a certain printing and binding style. I own one and I like it. It has a nice feel and the text is easy to read. I wish they'd update the art, but other than that it's a really nice Bible for the times I need a NAB, like at Bible studies (I'm normally a RSV-CE man).

Interestingly enough, you can buy low-cost (but nice) versions of this Bible that say "Official Catholic Bible" on the spine. That isn't strictly true, but some folks may feel more confident having that on there. :)

http://img1.imagesbn.com/p/9780529068118_p0_v1_s260x420.jpg


#4

The official Bible of the Vatican is the latin language Nova Vulgata(New Vulgate). This is a revised version of the Latin Vulgate of Saint Jerome which is revised with latest scholarship from Greek and Hebrew sources. As far as I know there is no direct translation of the Nova Vulgata into English. The RSVCE is used on the Vatican website and for documents for English readers. For liturgy the NAB variants in the USA. The NRSV in Canada. The Jerusalem Bible in most of the rest of the English world. Ive heard that the JB may be replaced with a Catholic version of the ESV eventually in the UK. There are numerous other English translations that have been Church approved for personal reading such as the DR, Confraternity, Knox, NJB, CCB, Good News Bible. The first three were used liturgically in the past. Also note that some independent versions of the Psalms exist that are used for the mass or liturgy of the hours. The Grail and Revised Grail psalms are two that come to mind.

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#5

[quote="andy92, post:1, topic:317311"]
So what is the official translation of the Holy Bible (United States and also Universal Church?

I have always thought New American Bible for U.S.

But what about the Duey Rhemes. Or any others there are hundreds.

What about St.Joseph's version and such?

[/quote]

The official Bible of the Church is the New Vulgate, it is Latin. The Version approved for liturgical use in the United States is the New American Bible. The version used in most Vatican document official translations (Latin to English) is the Revised Standard Version - Catholic Edition.


#6

[quote="Fidelis, post:3, topic:317311"]

This version is simply the NABRE in a certain printing and binding style. I own one and I like it. It has a nice feel and the text is easy to read. I wish they'd update the art, but other than that it's a really nice Bible for the times I need a NAB, like at Bible studies (I'm normally a RSV-CE man).

]

[/quote]

I've got an NAB and an NABRE. If by art you mean those hideous color drawings where Jesus looks like a deranged ax murderer (the ones Catholic Book Publishing Company has used forever where the pictures have a halo because the printing plates don't line up) then I totally agree. The best update would be to tear them out. I can't, for the life of me, understand why somebody can't print a NAB or NABRE that looks like something a serious adult would buy. Surely they could sub out design to Thomas Nelson or Zondervan or somebody!


#7

[quote="JRRTFAN, post:6, topic:317311"]
I've got an NAB and an NABRE. If by art you mean those hideous color drawings where Jesus looks like a deranged ax murderer (the ones Catholic Book Publishing Company has used forever where the pictures have a halo because the printing plates don't line up) then I totally agree. The best update would be to tear them out. I can't, for the life of me, understand why somebody can't print a NAB or NABRE that looks like something a serious adult would buy. Surely they could sub out design to Thomas Nelson or Zondervan or somebody!

[/quote]

Even if they replaced them fine art of some kind, or traditional iconography (like below). I do like the idea of fine color plates of biblical scenes in my Bible, but with all the beautiful Christian art that's been produced for 2000 years-- seriously? :confused:

http://storesonline.com/members/1286684/uploaded/The_Crucifixion_of_Jesus_Christ.jpg


#8

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