Transsexual wins lawsuit against Library of Congress

cnn.com/2008/US/09/19/transsexual.discrimination/index.html

*WASHINGTON (CNN) – A former Army commander who underwent a sex change operation was discriminated against by the U.S. government, a federal judge ruled…U.S. District Court Judge James Robinson said Schroer’s civil rights were violated. *

I’m sorry, but are these the civil rights that Martin Luther King and others fought for? Is it discrimination? I think that question misses the larger (and infinitely more important) issue.

Lord, we need You now more than ever.

No, the Schroer decision was based upon Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. That section of the Act forbids sex discrimination. According to the Wikipedia entry:

[quote="Wikipedia article]The prohibition on sex discrimination was added by Howard W. Smith, a powerful Virginian Democrat who chaired the House Rules Committee and who had strongly opposed the Civil Rights Act. The addition of “sex” to title VII is commonly described as a cynical attempt to defeat the bill by inserting objectionable amendments.[10][11] Representative Carl Elliott of Alabama later claimed, “Smith didn’t give a damn about women’s rights…he was trying to knock off votes either then or down the line because there was always a hard core of men who didn’t favor women’s rights,”[12] and the Congressional Record records that Smith was greeted by laughter when he introduced the amendment.[13]
[/quote]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights_Act_of_1964

Yes, to be promised a job and then have the offer rescinded once the Library learns you are transsexual is discrimination.

I’ve said that many times this election season. :o

Well I know what they did was discriminative, and I mainly asked that question because I thought it missed the entire point! The article tries to make it sound like “sex changes” are an extension of civil rights as well.

Although to be honest, I would argue that, despite the mutilation that this man had performed on himself, none of it made him a woman - so any gender discrimination was superficial at most (admittedly, that still could have been the mindset of the ones hiring). In the end, he can’t perform a sex change on his soul.

We need to pray for him.

This was actually a pretty “pure” case of gender discrimination. There are groups who send out resumes with only the name changed and all the qualifications remaining the same. They do this to get a feel for if a company has hiring practices that are discriminatory toward, say women.

In this case, the qualifications of the individual remained exactly the same because it was the same person. So what job at the Library of Congress that could be done by David could not be done by Diana?

If you presuppose the notion that removing and inverting one’s genitalia actually produces a sex change and that the gender of one’s soul is subjective…then yes :rolleyes:

But again, I’m not arguing whether or not the people who did the hiring were discriminating based on gender. That very well could have been the mindset with which they canceled the job offer. I’m still convinced that that question misses the point.

Not getting into all my thoughts on transgender surgery – I think the person in this article, was discriminated against. I think that there are probably more details we are not privvy to here, but just looking at the story for face value…why would the person be excluded from a job, as a female, and not as a male? Unless, the government didn’t want to ‘deal’ with a transgendered person, and it’s not gender discrimination as much as transgender discrimination.

I know that in Mass., they have constructed laws to defend against this type of thing–transgendered people being fired, etc…strictly for being transgendered.

I personally feel great sympathy for people who choose to change their gender…it must be a life filled with tremendous angst, and personal strife…of which I will never know the pain of. I think the greatest pain I see for people who are transgendered, is that they are not living authentically…in their own minds, in the body they were born with–nor, after they have surgery. They still won’t be living as an authentic male or female even after surgery, and hormone treatments; so, I can only imagine the difficulties they must go through in feeling this way, and trying to make a life for themselves.:frowning:

Interesting article.

This is why they need our prayers - it can’t be an easy cross to carry. I know it’s no PC to say, but they’re confused, and only God can speak to their hearts at this point. We have to pray that they will let him in.

I have seen a few documentaries on people who have undergone transgender surgery, and before they are considered for surgery, they have to undergo I believe, one year of psychiatic evaluation. But, I still wonder if something horribly traumatic happened to them in their childhood, to make them wish to abandon their gender–as a form of escaping for who they were as kids, you know? It’s always been a theory of mine, but I’m not a doctor, so I can only speculate. Many people seeking surgery to change genders, say that they always felt this way–even as children. So, not sure if it’s medical, or psychological…or both…I don’t know.

Either way-- I agree, matt–they, as all of us, have our crosses to bear, and are in need of prayer! And I do think that the person in the article was discriminated against.

God bless.

I think the greatest pain I see for people who are transgendered, is that they are not living authentically…in their own minds, in the body they were born with–nor, after they have surgery. They still won’t be living as an authentic male or female even after surgery, and hormone treatments; so, I can only imagine the difficulties they must go through in feeling this way, and trying to make a life for themselves

Whatevergirl,

I think this is dead on. Clearly from our Catholic understanding, and by the use of plain reason, we can not affirm that gender re-assignment surgery is really possible. It is only possible to make women look like men, and vice versa, in probably rather convincing ways. But in the end this is only accidental.

However, these people need our prayers, respect, sympathy and love. It also might not be our own individual place to shatter “their illusion”, which is a deeply rooted and personal crisis which most of us probably can not imagine. I think too many Christians are zealous to berate them because we understand them to be misguided.

It is certainly not our place to deny them jobs that they are otherwise perfectly capable of performing. Ultimately, we are not obligated to believe that they are really are the gender they have switched to, but we still owe them respect and dignity.

From the article, I feel the court was correct in its decision.

Who cares? We aren’t gunna change anything. We are and will lose. Keep praying…that’s all you can do because we won’t do anything on this world.

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