Trent's Catechism


#1

Really wonderful! Just getting into it. Downloaded it. Copied into my word processing program.

Going though it line by line. Marking in bold simple subjects, verbs, and objects. An old college trick when I used to teach composition.

I’ve been reading daily – very much in the same spirit of heart when praying the Divine Office.

Just wonderful says I.


#2

I have read through about 1/3 of the Catechism of Trent, it is pretty nice and straightforward.

It is available online for free, in case others were interested.

Im not sure what the marking in bold “simple subjects, verbs and objects” is supposed to do.


#3

Helps to focus on what is really being said, especially in compound or complex sentences. It is a modern analogue to the “old-skool” diagramming, but in this case it is not an editing technique, but a studying technique.

Regards,
Joe

BTW, to the OP: Tablet PC’s are great for this. You can print the WP document to a PDF, and then annotate it with Xournal (if you use Linux) or Windows Journal (if your operating system comes from Redmond).


#4

Yes, Joe knows the drill :slight_smile:


#5

I’ll posts some lines from time to time from the Catechism of Trent. Here’s one for today: God Is Called Father Because He Adopts Christians Through Grace.

When I saw that, I was made very happy.


#6

Found this today under the heading of “Creator.” For background, the Creed is being explained.

For God formed the world not from materials of any sort, but created it from nothing, and that not by constraint or necessity, but spontaneously, and of His own free will. Nor was He impelled to create by any other cause than a desire to communicate His goodness to creatures. Being essentially happy in Himself He stands not in need of anything, as David expresses it: I have said to the Lord, thou art my God, for thou hast no need of my goods.

Wonderful, eh?

Credo!!


#7

I’ve got a TAN version I’m meaning to read right through soon. I understand that this older Catechism deals far more extensively with the Protestant challenge.


#8

Micky, we’ll have to read it and announce what’s what :slight_smile:


#9

Here’s a wonderful snipped on creation. Lots of threads about that on CA Forums.

Check this out: * As it was His own goodness that influenced Him when He did all things whatsoever He would, so in the work of creation He followed no external form or model; but contemplating, and as it were imitating, the universal model contained in the divine intelligence, the supreme Architect, with infinite wisdom and power-attributes peculiar to the Divinity – created all things in the beginning. He spoke and they were made: he commanded and they were created.*

Does my soul good. Good old fashioned truth with no hemming or hawing.

:thumbsup:


#10

It’s definitely a good one. In fact, you’ll notice the CCC sites it a lot when dealing with topics like justification, etc (it’s cited as the Roman Catechism). It bears pointing out that it was designed for use by priests. Anyway, if you like that Catechism, I also recommend St. Peter Canisius’ “Summe of Christian Doctrine”–it’s a great Catechism that is similar to the Roman, but with breakdown’s also of popular prayers and specific works of charity–and it tends to read even more devotionally than the Roman (sadly, it’s hard to find these days) :thumbsup:

As an aside, the CCC was designed primarily for use by bishops. The only universal Catechism designed specifically with lay people in mind was the Catechism of St. Pius X (which sadly only saw limited publication).


#11

Googled. No joy. Hard to find no doubt.


#12

With the exception that one has reference to the future and the other to the past, we can discover no difference between the predictions of the Prophets and the preaching of the Apostles, between the faith of the ancient Patriarchs and that of Christians.

This is so important, strong, and powerful. Especially for Christian unity.


#13

our Saviour, who gave light, liberty and salvation, not to one people only, but to all men, of all ages to men oppressed, not by famine, or Egyptian or Babylonian bondage, but sitting in the shadow of death and fettered by the galling chains of sin and of the devil who purchased for them a right to the inheritance of heaven and reconciled them to God the Father!

This sentence took my breath away :slight_smile:


#14
  • The pastor, then, should enter on the exposition of this third Article by developing the grandeur of this mystery, which the Sacred Scriptures very frequently propose for our consideration as the principal source of our eternal salvation. Its meaning he should teach to be that we believe and confess that the same Jesus Christ, our only Lord, the Son of God, when He assumed human flesh for us in the womb of the Virgin, was not conceived like other men, from the seed of man, but in a manner transcending the order of nature, that is, by the power of the Holy Ghost; so that the same Person, remaining God as He was from eternity, became man, what He was not before.*

WOW!


#15

Here’s some more good material rom the Catechism of Trent in easy to understand, unquestionable language:

*Who art in Heaven *

… But though God is present in all places and in all things, without being bound by any limits, as has been already said, yet in Sacred Scripture it is frequently said that He has His dwelling in heaven. And the reason is because the heavens which we see above our heads are the noblest part of the world, remain ever Incorruptible, surpass all other bodies in power, grandeur and beauty, and are endowed with fixed and regular motion.

Of Heaven and Earth

The words heaven and earth include all things which the heaven’s and the earth contain; for besides the heavens, which the Prophet has called the works of his fingers, He also gave to the sun its brilliancy, and to the moon and stars their beauty; and that they might be for signs, and for seasons, and for days and years. He so ordered the celestial bodies in a certain and uniform course, that nothing varies more than their continual revolution, while nothing is more fixed than their variety.

*Motives For Adopting The Necessary Means *

…But if we look to the heavens, do we not behold the verification of these words of David? For ever, O Lord, thy word standeth firm in the heavens. Constant in their motions, uninterrupted in their revolutions,
they never depart in the least from the laws divinely prescribed.

*That God May Be Thanked For His Favours *

…If the sun by its light, if the stars by their motion and revolutions, are of any advantage to man;

*Formation Of The Universe *

The earth also God commanded to stand in the midst of the world, rooted in its own foundation…

No hemming or hawing! Now if only modern man had the faith to even consider this as possible.

i6.photobucket.com/albums/y236/markjwyatt/logo_170px.jpg


#16

There does seem to be much about modernity retards faith. But we have been told about that from the beginning.


#17

Well said! Shoot, someone is actually perusing this thread :smiley:

This touched my heart and, well, all sorts of stuff. Like the tax collector.

The part just before it in the Catechism is tremendous too.

  • Duty Of Spiritual Nativity

We must also take care lest to our great injury it should happen that just as there was no room for Him in the inn at Bethlehem, in which to be born, so likewise now, after He has been born in the flesh, He should find no room in our hearts in which to be born spiritually. For since He is most desirous of our salvation, this spiritual birth is the object of His most earnest solicitude.
As, then, by the power of the Holy Ghost, and in a manner superior to the order of nature, He was made man and was born, was holy and even holiness itself, so does it become our duty to be born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, but of God; to walk as new creatures in newness of spirit, and to preserve that holiness and purity of soul which so much becomes men regenerated by the Spirit of God. Thus shall we reflect some faint image of the holy Conception and Nativity of the Son of God, which are the objects of our firm faith, and believing which we revere and adore the wisdom of God in a mystery which is hidden. *


#18

A little snippet from the 2nd edition Catechism. It’s so dear to me. I bought one during RCIA 3 years ago. This clause The desire for God is written in the human heart spoke exactly to my condition.

I wore out my paperback one. Got the new hard bound now a couple days ago. Much smaller dimensions. Same great and huge words of grace and truth.


#19

**But if we look to the heavens, do we not behold the verification of these words of David? For ever, O Lord, thy word standeth firm in the heavens. Constant in their motions, uninterrupted in their revolutions,
they never depart in the least from the laws divinely prescribed. **

Does this apply to the fact that the moon is receding from the earth at the rate of an inch a year?


#20

*** Useful Considerations on the Passion **

When the faithful have once attained the knowledge of these things, the pastor should next proceed to explain those particulars of the Passion and death of Christ which may enable them if not to comprehend, at least to contemplate, the immensity of so stupendous a mystery.*

Really like that. “if not to comprehend, at least to contemplate . . …”

Justly said.


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