Tridentine Mass in LA Area

Okay, today I went to a Tridentine Mass at Mission San Buenaventura and I’m hoping it was just a poor example of Tridentine Masses today because I was left less than unimpressed. I’m pretty sure it was a Low Mass from what I could figure out from the missal. But I could barely follow along because the Priest who said the Mass was not wearing a mike so we could not hear him AT ALL except for when he gave his sermon.

I feel like my bubble has been burst. I don’t see how this was more reverant than the Norvus Ordo Mass I went to on Saturday night. Can someone tell me what the Tridentine Masses are like at other churches in the LA area? Are they usually Low Masses or High Masses? This one was also not a dialog Mass. The altar server said all the responses and the congregation didn’t do anything. Frankly I would prefer a dialog Mass otherwise I don’t really see the point. I’m willing to give it another try somewhere else, but I sure wish I hadn’t driven an hour to see what it was like :wink:

I am new to the Tridentine Latin Masses…but one thing I do know, is that the Priest has his back to you during most of the Mass, and while he speaks in Latin, it is barely audible and it is not intended for you to hear. I recommend getting the English/Latin Missal, preferably the St. Andrews Missal, to guide you. I am still learning myself…but I just hope you had a bad experience, because I have been nothing but impressed with the Latin Masses I have attended. It is great. You have to understand the big picture, in order to understand the Latin Rite. It is great in my opinion…I just wish you felt the same way. THe structure of the Mass and how it is presented is completely different from what you are used to. IMO it brings you closer to Christ.

I knew the Priest had his back to us and that for parts of it he would be inaudible (just like parts of the NO Mass), but if they generally don’t wear mikes so you can hear most of what they say then I don’t think I’ll be making a habit of going, though I’d like to attend at least one High Mass to see what it is like.

Now I completely understand why little old ladies used to say their rosaries during Mass.

One of these days though I am going to get myself out of bed early enough to attend the Latin Novus Ordo Mass at the Dominican Monastery. It’s at 7 a.m. :eek:

[quote=dumspirospero] IMO it brings you closer to Christ.
[/quote]

I wish I could say the same.

[quote=jennstall]I knew the Priest had his back to us and that for parts of it he would be inaudible (just like parts of the NO Mass), but if they generally don’t wear mikes so you can hear most of what they say then I don’t think I’ll be making a habit of going, though I’d like to attend at least one High Mass to see what it is like.

Now I completely understand why little old ladies used to say their rosaries during Mass.

One of these days though I am going to get myself out of bed early enough to attend the Latin Novus Ordo Mass at the Dominican Monastery. It’s at 7 a.m. :eek:.
[/quote]

No matter where you go, if the Tridentine Mass is said correctly it’s mostly inaudible! This is what prompted Fr. Steadman to issue his “Sunday Missal” for Catholic faithful to follow along. And, yes, the low Mass was normative in the Tridentine era. Occasionally you would get a Missa cantata or “sung Mass” which most parishes called a “High Mass.” Those were easier to follow because more parts were out loud.

Deacon Ed

The low Mass is also called “the spoken Mass”. Many parts of it are to be prayed silently or "solo voce, by the priest who says them. Therefore they are not meant to be heard just prayed along with the priest. Using your missal (many TLM parishes have a handout for your use - it is red and it is returned after Mass) you can pray along with the priest.

For this reason it is rather difficult to “mike the priest” - turning the mike on and off so often during the Mass would be a serious distraction for him. Some priests have a booming voice, like the one we had yesterday and he could be heard in the back of a large parish.

In the meantime, I would suggest for those parts that are audible, you could sit closer to the front. This is always a good idea for your first few TLM experiences anyway because it gives you opportunity to observe the gestures of the priest and altar boys as well as hearing the parts which can be heard.

I also urge you to try to experience a high Mass or Missa Cantata - where the priest, scola and choir chant or sing most of the Mass.

Now there are other TLM parishes which have a dialogue Mass and probably since you are more comfortable with participatio actuoso you would like this. In a dialogue Mass, still using our missals to follow the priest, we sing along with the choir the Ordinary parts of the Mass in Gregorian Chant as well as the singing of hymns.

Try it a few more times and do try the NOM in Latin since you have an opportunity - it is also very beautiful.

[quote=jennstall]Okay, today I went to a Tridentine Mass at Mission San Buenaventura and I’m hoping it was just a poor example of Tridentine Masses today because I was left less than unimpressed. I’m pretty sure it was a Low Mass from what I could figure out from the missal. But I could barely follow along because the Priest who said the Mass was not wearing a mike so we could not hear him AT ALL except for when he gave his sermon.

I feel like my bubble has been burst. I don’t see how this was more reverant than the Norvus Ordo Mass I went to on Saturday night. Can someone tell me what the Tridentine Masses are like at other churches in the LA area? Are they usually Low Masses or High Masses? This one was also not a dialog Mass. The altar server said all the responses and the congregation didn’t do anything. Frankly I would prefer a dialog Mass otherwise I don’t really see the point. I’m willing to give it another try somewhere else, but I sure wish I hadn’t driven an hour to see what it was like :wink:
[/quote]

You might want to drive 50 miles from Ventura to San Fernando and take in the Tridentine Mass at Old Mission San Fernando.

Msgr. Francis Weber, the historian and archivist of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles is the celebrant. The Tridentine Mass takes place monthly, and there are special masses during the holidays.

Actually, San Fernando will be much closer to me since I actually live in North Hollywood, not Ventura. I woke up too late for the Tridentine Mass on Detroit Ave yesterday so I figured I’d take a nice drive. :slight_smile:

I guess a large part of my disappointment is that people’s enthusiasm for the Latin Mass led me to rather high expectations for the experience. Oh well. Live and learn. I guess I’m not a traditionalist because I prefer saying Latin myself to almost hearing someone else say it :wink:

I do intend to get to a High Mass at some point for the experience and as soon as I get back from my trip to Boston I’m going to make it a point of going to bed at a decent hour on a Saturday night so I can attend the N.O. Latin Mass at the monastery.

I don’t know about LA but your experience was quite the same as mine when I attended my first Latin Mass here in Chicago. And the Mass I attended was High Mass.

[quote=CatholicSamurai]I don’t know about LA but your experience was quite the same as mine when I attended my first Latin Mass here in Chicago. And the Mass I attended was High Mass.
[/quote]

Well that’s not very reassuring. :nope:

Have you ever tried another one or was that once enough?

Go for it, Jenn! It’s an education!

I, too, was “wet blanketed” by my first TLM because of the silence and remoteness (the priest was 93 years old and I am SURE he screwed up the canon because he finished waaaaaay ahead of me – and my Latin is pretty good!).

When the Mass of Paul VI is celebrated in Latin with the ceremonial we think of as belonging to the TLM, it is very beautiful. For one accustomed to “participatio actuoso” (just learned that from this thread: it’s a bad day when I don’t learn *something! :thumbsup: ) *it provides an excellent introduction to worship in Latin. If your Latin is half decent, you will notice that the English translation is quite odd. For SSPX types, you wil note that the canon in Latin says “pro vobis et multis.”

My first Latin Mass of Paul VI was in Assumption Grotto, Detroit, where it is conducted with solemnity, dignity, pomp and joy. One way I praise a well-executed Mass of Paul VI is to say, “It was the Mass of Paul VI – but you could hardly tell!”

[quote=mercygate]…For SSPX types, you wil note that the canon in Latin says “pro vobis et multis.”
[/quote]

I think that’s exactly what the SSPX types focus on when they bring up problems with the translation of Paul VI’s Mass…It doesn’t say “for all,” it says “for many.” Now if the Latin was “omnis,” that would be something else.

Although I don’t agree with the SSPX on most points, I would like very much to know by what right the ICEL members play fast and loose with a Missal translation like that (and many, many other places as well).

[quote=aaron_brown99]I think that’s exactly what the SSPX types focus on when they bring up problems with Paul VI’s Mass…

It doesn’t say “for all,” it says “for many.”
[/quote]

Honest! The Paul VI Mass says ** “pro vobis et pro multis effundetur . . .”** Knocked me over when I saw it!

[quote=mercygate]If your Latin is half decent, you will notice that the English translation is quite odd. For SSPX types, you wil note that the canon in Latin says “pro vobis et multis.”

[/quote]

My Latin is coming along, but it doesn’t even approach half decent yet LOL. Right now, I can follow along with the pronunciation and I recognize the most common words and can usually hazard a guess at some other ones as well. I can pray the Hail Mary in Latin! The Our Father I’m still working on though. It’s a longer prayer. I get as far as Pater Noster, qui es in caelis, before I have to open up my Palm Pilot and take a look at the rest of it :wink:

I will attend some more Latin Masses even just for the purpose of improving my Latin vocabulary and I do hope to get to a High Mass at some point. Fortunately, my own Parish does Gregorian Chant at the vigil Mass on Saturday evening and we sing a lot of the prayers in Latin.

"Welcome to Purgatory, here’s your abridged OCP hymnal containing the six songs we’ll be singing until you are ready to join your Lord. Please turn to page 4 and we’ll start with 'On Eagle’s Wings’"

Thank you, I laughed and laughed. The only thing I might add is that they are required to do the hand animation thingy.

It takes a few masses to be able to follow along well, it is easier done at the high mass.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.