Troping


#1

Some time back, I seem to recall that the Holy Father, gave an instruction on troping in the Ordinary Form of the Mass. Can anyone refer me to a site that will either verify what I seem to remember or disprove it.

Thanks :)


#2

Vatican Intervenes: No More Tropes in the Agnus Dei

Is that what you mean?


#3

Thanks. That helps.


#4

One of the licit options for the penitential rite is a trope though.


#5

[quote="OraLabora, post:4, topic:312396"]
One of the licit options for the penitential rite is a trope though.

[/quote]

Yes. I believe the difference is that the Kyrie tropes are written into the Missal already, while the Agnus Dei tropes were being composed by third parties and wedged in.


#6

[quote="Elizium23, post:5, topic:312396"]
Yes. I believe the difference is that the Kyrie tropes are written into the Missal already, while the Agnus Dei tropes were being composed by third parties and wedged in.

[/quote]

That's correct, and the Kyrie has a long tradition of being troped, though Trent put that to rest. If you look at the current Graduale Romanum, the titles below each Kyrie, are the titles of the abolished tropes, e.g. Kyrie XI "Orbis Factor". Some of the early tropes have been recorded including Orbis Factor:

Orbis Factor


#7

[quote="Elizium23, post:5, topic:312396"]
Yes. I believe the difference is that the Kyrie tropes are written into the Missal already, while the Agnus Dei tropes were being composed by third parties and wedged in.

[/quote]

The Missal gives sample invocations, but the priest is free to "wedge in" others.


#8

[quote="MarkThompson, post:7, topic:312396"]
The Missal gives sample invocations, but the priest is free to "wedge in" others.

[/quote]

Yep. The instructions for Option 3 for the Penitential Act includes the phrase "or other invocations."

I've seen arguments that suggest these invocations do not meet the definition of "trope" (and thus are irrelevant to the topic of troping) but I don't know enough on the subject to make an argument either way.


#9

[quote="SMHW, post:8, topic:312396"]
I've seen arguments that suggest these invocations do not meet the definition of "trope" (and thus are irrelevant to the topic of troping) but I don't know enough on the subject to make an argument either way.

[/quote]

I think the opposite, rather. Historically, tropes were embellishments upon the texts of the Mass, not replacements for portions of them. Thus a trope on the Agnus Dei might say (and this is an actual example): "Agnus Dei, quem Iohannes in Iordane baptizavit ovans et dicens, ecce qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis" ("Lamb of God, whom John baptized in the Jordan rejoicing and saying, behold: who takest away the sins of the world; have mercy on us"). So the variable invocations contemplated by Form C of the penitential rite seem to me to have more in common with traditional tropes than do the textual alterations which have frequently been practiced of late. Still, I think it better simply to call them, as the Missal does, invocations.


#10

[quote="SMHW, post:8, topic:312396"]
Yep. The instructions for Option 3 for the Penitential Act includes the phrase "or other invocations."

I've seen arguments that suggest these invocations do not meet the definition of "trope" (and thus are irrelevant to the topic of troping) but I don't know enough on the subject to make an argument either way.

[/quote]

I guess the best thing is to judge for one's self.

Orbis factor (Latin)

  1. Orbis factor rex aeterne, eleison
  2. Pietatis fons immense, eleison
  3. Noxas omnes nostras pelle, eleison
  4. Christe qui lux es mundi dator vitae, eleison
  5. Arte laesos daemonis intuere, eleison
  6. Conservans te credentes confirmansque, eleison
  7. Patrem tuum teque flamen utrorumque, eleison
  8. Deum scimus unum atque trinum esse, eleison
  9. Clemens nobis adsis paraclite ut vivamus in te, eleison.

Orbis factor (English):

  1. Maker of the world, King eternal, have mercy upon us.
  2. O immense source of pity, have mercy upon us.
  3. Drive off all our evils, have mercy upon us.
  4. Christ who art the light of the world and giver of life, have mercy upon us.
  5. Consider the wounds produced by the devil's art, have mercy upon us.
  6. Keeping and confirming thy believers, have mercy upon us.
  7. Thou and thy Father, an equal light, have mercy upon us.
  8. We know that God is one and three, have mercy upon us.
  9. Thou, merciful unto us, art present with the Holy Spirit that we might live in thee, have mercy upon us.

Suggestion from missal:

Qui missus es sanáre contrítos corde: Kýrie, eléison.
Populus respondet:
Kýrie, eléison.
Sacerdos:
Qui peccatóres vocáre venísti: Christe, eléison.
Populus:
Christe, eléison.
Sacerdos:
Qui ad déxteram Patris sedes, ad interpellándum pro nobis:Kýrie, eléison.
Populus:
Kýrie, eléison.

English:

You were sent to heal the contrite of heart: Lord have mercy
Lord have mercy

You came to call sinners: Christ have mercy
Christ have mercy

You are seated at the right hand of the Father to intercede for us: Lord have mercy
Lord have mercy

It might be more in the style of a responsory than a trope. It's a gray area.

But it clearly has its roots in the original troped Kyries. You could easily use as invocations the first three from Orbis Factor, for instance (since the priest can substitute his own), and they wouldn't be out of place.


#11

Interesting discussion so far. My query was really relating to the Ordinary Form. Specifically, the Lamb of God, where the "troped" words are "Jesus, Bread of Life, etc.
Jesus, Prince of Peace. etc."


#12

[quote="corsair, post:11, topic:312396"]
Interesting discussion so far. My query was really relating to the Ordinary Form. Specifically, the Lamb of God, where the "troped" words are "Jesus, Bread of Life, etc.
Jesus, Prince of Peace. etc."

[/quote]

Those are the Christological tropes from the "Lamb of God" in Marty Haugen's Mass of Creation, which was so widely used under the old translation that it would be safe to say that nearly-every U.S. Catholic knows those tropes (or "invocations" as Haugen calls them) by heart. In my experience, it was the only English setting of the old translation that I ever encountered with troped titles for Jesus in the "Lamb of God".

Haugen has updated the Mass of Creation for use with the new translation (see saintfrancischurch.org/resources/14/Music%20Ministry/Mass%20Parts/Mass%20of%20Creation/Keyboard.pdf). I've only experienced it once - it was quite jarring to try to sing the corrected, trope-free "Lamb of God" to the old melody well known from some 25-plus years of singing the old version. (When you're used the first five notes being "Je/sus/Lamb/of/God", having to now sing "La/a/amb/of/God" over those same five notes is hard to do...)

[Sadly, it the revised *MOC till uses a problematic, if not actually illicit verse-and-refrain setting of the Gloria.]


#13

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