Truest thing I've seen about media & popular culture in a long time

From Henry Rollins' piece in the LA Weekly about Amy Winehouse:

QUOTE, "I can point to at least one thing: technology. The Internet, the camera cellphone and the like have not only sped up the world's information uptake but they have cheapened that which they capture.

A song now is merely a small file to be downloaded for free. A text conversation is a short exchange of often grossly truncated language that corresponds to a thought made all the more shallow by the process. Many of us talk more and say less, see more but retain little. We are blessed with worldwide connectivity but have become very unplugged. To hack into a hackneyed phrase: "It's all content to me." I think this is a monumental factor in how we see ourselves and each other.," UNQUOTE

Source: blogs.laweekly.com/westcoastsound/2011/08/who_killed_amy_winehouse.php

No hand written letters or thank you notes anymore. It's all email and text messages. Really takes the personal meaning out of it.

Wow. Henry Rollins surprises me every time. I especially like the line "The world moves very quickly now, with great hunger and often no sense of history."

How very true that is.

I recall at the dawn of the internet, when it was referred to as "the information superhighway."

Our local paper had an editorial cartoon: There was a sketch of a huge multilane toll booth, with "information superhighway--5000 lanes open" emblazoned on the sign over the booths.

And in front of each booth were sketches of long lines of garbage trucks.

After fifteen-odd years, I'd have to pretty much agree.

[quote="wild_thing, post:3, topic:251157"]
Wow. Henry Rollins surprises me every time.

[/quote]

Yes, Henry has said some really profound things. More proof that you can not judge someone's intelligence by their looks. You would not expect such insight from a member of the old 70's punk band Black Flag.

Not true for me. CAF was/is the first/last computer thing I'm involved with.

[quote="Swiss_Guy, post:6, topic:251157"]
Not true for me. CAF was/is the first/last computer thing I'm involved with.

[/quote]

If choosing only one computer thing to be involved with, CAF is a great choice.

[quote="eegardner, post:2, topic:251157"]
No hand written letters or thank you notes anymore. It's all email and text messages. Really takes the personal meaning out of it.

[/quote]

My son hand wrote all his graduation thank you notes.

At the receiving end, I received handwritten thank you notes from every person whom I gifted this year (quite a few).

I often do wonder about the use of paper and stamps for thank yous, when as soon as they are received, they are read then hit the circular file.....an email note would have been just as welcomed by me!

[quote="Catholic90, post:8, topic:251157"]
My son hand wrote all his graduation thank you notes.

At the receiving end, I received handwritten thank you notes from every person whom I gifted this year (quite a few).

I often do wonder about the use of paper and stamps for thank yous, when as soon as they are received, they are read then hit the circular file.....an email note would have been just as welcomed by me!

[/quote]

Good for your son! I think hand written is more personal. I guess I'm a bit old fashioned when it comes to things like that.

But I suppose for environmental reasons email and texts are better. I still have a hard time with it though. :shrug: I am trying to get over that. :o

I miss my old Commodore Amiga 500... From the days when computers didn't need the Internet in order to be considered cool. I still feel proud I owned a certified 16-bit machine years before most of my friends got their Super Nes or Mega Drive... long live the Amiga forever!

Those were the days.... the "Golden Age" of computers(and also Video Games).

I think it's important to note that it's not the medium which is to blame, but the users. Entertainment is cheapened when people view it cheaply, not just because it is easily available. That being said, it's easy to see how someone for whom something is easily available would appreciate it less than would someone for whom it is a scarcity.

I think having gratitude for goods is a key factor in giving us the ability to enjoy them. Having constant access to some good makes it easier for us to fail to be properly grateful for it.

I could say a lot more but I'd probably catch flak for sounding like a Buddhist. :D

[quote="eegardner, post:7, topic:251157"]
If choosing only one computer thing to be involved with, CAF is a great choice.

[/quote]

I don't agree with this.

On CAF, you're getting a very narrow sampling of the population, and receiving a skewed point of view. The people who post on CAF are "Catholics who are willing to be involved with an online community." That is a very small portion of the Catholic population, and an even smaller portion of the general population.

The Traditional Section of CAF is especially "narrow," It's easy to get the impression from reading it that absolutely every Catholic is in favor of a return to more traditional Catholicism, the TLM, more Latin, more chant, and practices like veiling, all-night fasting before Mass, etc. But if you read or talk to a sampling of other Catholics, it becomes apparent that traditionalist Catholics are actually a minority in the U.S. (That's doesn't mean that their point-of-view is invalid. It just means that they are not the majority.)

I think we should seek to widen our acquisition of knowledge and specifically seek out those that we are likely to disagree with so that we can more fully understand them and so that we have a broader basis of knowledge on which to base our conclusions.

And I think that we should always seek the most accurate facts in an attempt to discover the truth. One of the best ways to do this is to research a broad spectrum, not just stay in one little corner of the world. When we only talk to those who agree with us, we end up skewed.

One of the things I have always refused to use on any online community is the "Ignore" function. I think this has no place in CAF, although I know people use it. We shouldn't close ourselves off from any fellow Catholic, even one with whom we vehemently disagree.

I think it is useless to rage against the march of time.

Like it or not (I'm using the word "like" in the traditional sense), social media is here.

I think it's highly appropriate to study it and analyze what it is doing to our ability to communicate. Personally, I think it is doing dreadful things to communication and relationships, especially in the workplace. I can see a huge divide between the over 30s and under 30s in my workplace, and it's disturbing. It makes it more difficult for us to work together.

I'm hoping that awareness of this "gap" between social media users and non-users will eventually bring about some kind of "counter-media" that will help to restore the ability to communicate in-person.

I am 54 years old and I am very uncomfortable with social media. My two daughters (25 and 28) are as comfortable with social media as I am with calling someone on the phone. This is how they communicate, and we who are older can either join in or not join in. It's our choice.

I know many women my age and older who are as comfortable with social media as a teenager, and who love the greater outreach that social media gives them. They are connected all over the world and they love it! Their age, appearance, state of health, disabilities, income level, etc. don't matter anymore--now they can communicate with thousands of people and be connected with everything that's happening. It's very exhiliarating for those who have taken the time and trouble to master social media.

And that's all it is. It's a skill, and we have to be willing to learn it, just like any other skill. I'm sure that when the phone was invented, many people refused to even try it because they were not willing to learn the skills involved with using it. But most people eventually overcame their fears, tackled it, and discovered the joy of talking to people far away from them.

We need to be in there, everyone. I really need to get my rear in gear and master the various forms of social media. I think many of you should, too.

But whether we choose to join in or to stay out of it, it will happen anyway.

[quote="Cat, post:12, topic:251157"]
I don't agree with this.

On CAF, you're getting a very narrow sampling of the population, and receiving a skewed point of view. The people who post on CAF are "Catholics who are willing to be involved with an online community." That is a very small portion of the Catholic population, and an even smaller portion of the general population.

The Traditional Section of CAF is especially "narrow," It's easy to get the impression from reading it that absolutely every Catholic is in favor of a return to more traditional Catholicism, the TLM, more Latin, more chant, and practices like veiling, all-night fasting before Mass, etc. But if you read or talk to a sampling of other Catholics, it becomes apparent that traditionalist Catholics are actually a minority in the U.S. (That's doesn't mean that their point-of-view is invalid. It just means that they are not the majority.)

I think we should seek to widen our acquisition of knowledge and specifically seek out those that we are likely to disagree with so that we can more fully understand them and so that we have a broader basis of knowledge on which to base our conclusions.

And I think that we should always seek the most accurate facts in an attempt to discover the truth. One of the best ways to do this is to research a broad spectrum, not just stay in one little corner of the world. When we only talk to those who agree with us, we end up skewed.

One of the things I have always refused to use on any online community is the "Ignore" function. I think this has no place in CAF, although I know people use it. We shouldn't close ourselves off from any fellow Catholic, even one with whom we vehemently disagree.

[/quote]

OK, what I was saying here was, Swiss Guy said, "CAF was/is the first/last computer thing I'm involved with." And my comment meant, if he chooses to visit only oneplace on the internet (and no other site), CAF was a good choice. With so many bad choices that could have been made, I was stating that his choice of CAF was a good choice. I am not saying that anyone should only get their Catholic information from CAF. I am not saying that other Catholic sites should not be visited. I just commented on Swiss Guy's statement of what his choice was. I was not trying to influence anyone in anyway.

[quote="havana1, post:1, topic:251157"]
From Henry Rollins' piece in the LA Weekly about Amy Winehouse:

QUOTE, "I can point to at least one thing: technology. The Internet, the camera cellphone and the like have not only sped up the world's information uptake but they have cheapened that which they capture.

A song now is merely a small file to be downloaded for free. A text conversation is a short exchange of often grossly truncated language that corresponds to a thought made all the more shallow by the process. Many of us talk more and say less, see more but retain little. We are blessed with worldwide connectivity but have become very unplugged. To hack into a hackneyed phrase: "It's all content to me." I think this is a monumental factor in how we see ourselves and each other.," UNQUOTE

Source: blogs.laweekly.com/westcoastsound/2011/08/who_killed_amy_winehouse.php

[/quote]

I've just got to say I never thought I'd see someone post something by Henry. My husband is a HUGE Rollins and Black Flag fan.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.