Trump tweets on California wildfires spark confusion, debate


#1

#2

They still have those five minnows that suck up all the fresh water?


#3

“…Trump appeared to be seizing on the wildfires to side with farmers on a separate debate over how to allocate California’s finite water resources among farmers, cities, fish and wildlife.”


#4

There have been deaths.

And he tweets ridiculous tweets again.

Never any empathy. Always things like this.

I guess next will be the photo-op of him throwing paper towels.


#5

As between believing California officials and their house publications and Trump, I’ll believe Trump. The article barely touches on water resources, but goes on and on about how they don’t need water anyway. A bit unpersuasive. How is it that Gov Brown is complaining mightily about “climate change” drought in California while simultaneously claiming the reservoirs are full?

Not credible.


#6

Yes of course. This is the best way to deal with a natural disaster.

Tweet!

No thanks to the hundreds of firefighters putting their lives at risk. No mention of the dead.

Just Tweets assigning blame and always with lack of empathy.


#7

The article I posted is from Reuters.


#8

That’s your belief about Trump and always was. No change with this. In any event, you don’t know whether he has empathy for the victims or not.


#9

Reuters has editorials too. This article is Dem propaganda from beginning to end. Couldn’t even let it just be about condemning Trump for “lack of empathy”. It had to get in a few licks for global warming too.

Maybe we’ll get some real news about the water supply in southern California sometime. But we sure didn’t in this article.


#10

The time he takes to to tweet ridiculous things, he could use to show support and empathy.

He doesn’t know how.


#11

I think it is generally best not to take his words as a source of truth. That’s not to say he is always wrong; a broken clock if right twice a day. But he’s does not reliably represent truth unambiguously.


#12

Oh, let’s see. This article is three years old, but the drought it was talking about has continued, so it’s probably still pretty relevant. There really is a water shortage in southern California and (unlike the Reuters article) NOAA says it’s not due to “climate change”. It’s due to the drought, but it’s also due to too many users of too little water.


#13

Where’s Redding, CA?

And Mendocino?


#14

After he said this, what did you want him to say?


#15

The president of the California Firefighters Association says Trump’s right; that water shortages are contributing to the difficulty in fighting the fires.


#16

Your article is from October 2017.


#17

Omigosh! Did the drought end then, all the reservoirs fill up, and a new drought start in 2018? Was there plenty of water in between the two droughts?

Or did the PR head of the firefighter’s association change his mind since 2017? Way back in 2017, he said this:

"Firefighters will often fly helicopters over a reservoir and dip large, attached buckets into the water. But that is proving difficult this year, especially in Northern California where the fiercest fires are raging.

“Aerial firefighters just have to go farther to find bodies of water,” Wills said. “It makes the job more difficult, because water is what puts fires out.”

Even larger lakes and reservoirs are at such low levels that helicopter pilots have difficulty putting the water scoopers deep enough to fill the containers with water, Wills said."

The article goes on to say that firefighters are forced to haul water by pack mules because of the difficulties. But Jerry Brown says there’s no water problem in firefighting, and we should believe him, instead of the firefighters or Trump, right?


#19

No.

Your article about Trump addressing the fires is from October.

So it would be like “thought and prayers” being said after the Las Vegas shooting counting as well for Parkland.


#20

Unbiased article about California forests, with page 14 talking about water.

http://www.ppic.org/wp-content/uploads/r_0917vbr.pdf


#21

Both cities are north of San Francisco, Mendocino on the coast, Redding more in the center of Northern California.

California is mostly desert, both high desert and low desert. This means it is arid, even if it seems green.

Much of the water from Northern California is re-routed to the LA Basin. It is an ongoing battle between Southern California and the rest of the state. Here is a primer on the aqueduct for those who might be curious.


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